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2/27/2012
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Upload Video To Multiple Hosts With OneLoad

Handy new service saves you the trouble of posting video on multiple online providers.

If your company produces video content, it's easy to put it on a single site and monitor the analytics. But what if your customer base demands content on multiple sites? Or suppose you'd like to reach new audiences or a specific demographic a single site does not cover?

You could upload your content one website at a time, and monitor the analytics at each website. Or you could use OneLoad.

OneLoad is a video distribution service from TubeMogul that places your video content across multiple sites with just a few clicks. The software has a free option--a great way to assess whether the service is useful for your enterprise--and starts at $150/month for basic features, or $75/month with a year's commitment. The free service is good for most small to midsize businesses--and there is no catch. Aside from enterprise sales, the company makes their money by aggregating statistics about video and selling it along with the data harvested from other clients. Here's a full list of partner sites.

The first step is to ensure that your content is encoded in the right format. OneLoad recommends encoding all content as H.264/MPEG-4 at a resolution of 640x480. The free version supports files under 500MB.

If your video isn't in that format and your video editing software can't export that format, software like MPEG Streamclip from Squared 5 (available for Mac and Windows) will convert just about anything to H.264 and resize the movies. The next few images will show you how to use MPEG Streamclip for this purpose.

Once the software is installed, open the application and select Open from the File Menu. Select the input file (there are also options for DVDs and online files). Next, select export to MPEG-4 from the file menu.

Click the iTunes button and select iPod 640x380 if your content is recorded in the aspect ratio 16:9. If it's in 4:3, select iPod 640x480. If you're not sure what the aspect ratio is, click the preview button--if the image looks squished or stretched, try the other setting.

Once you set the size, click OK to get back to the export screen. Here, set the Quality to 100%, and deselect "Limit Data Rate." Set the Frame Rate to "Better Downscaling." If you content was recorded interlaced, leave the progressive options alone. The sample clip was recorded progressively, so I'm going to deselect interlaced scaling. The options should look like the below.

When you're done, click Make MP4 and wait for the movie to encode. It's a CPU-intensive process, so it'll go more rapidly if you don't multitask.

Once your content is properly encoded, go to OneLoad.com and create an account, if you haven't already done so.

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