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Valentine's Day Virus Strikes

In This Issue:
1. Editor's Note: iPhone Could Take Mobile Music Market, Warner Music CEO Warns
2. Today's Top Story
    - The Love Bug: Valentine's Day Virus Strikes
3. Breaking News
    - Firefox Tops 300 Million Downloads But Loses Market Share
    - Microsoft Issues Warning On Daylight-Saving Time Software Flaw
    - SCO Can't Find Groklaw Blogger, Blames IBM
    - When It Comes To Broadband, U.S. Plays Follow The Leader
    - Samsung Reveals Ultrathin Cell Phone
    - RightNow Proves It Isn't Just The Other Salesforce.com
    - When It Comes To ID Theft, Where You Live Matters
    - Microsoft Settles Iowa Class-Action Lawsuit
    - Better Business Bureau Spoofed In Phishing Scam
    - EBay Pleased With Yahoo Ads, As Google Tests Start
4. The Latest Security Blog Posts
    - Combating The Black Market In Personal Data
    - Buy This Shampoo Or You'll Never See Your Data Again
    - A Walk Through Cybercrime's Underworld
5. White Papers
    - The Impact Of SOX
6. Get More Out Of InformationWeek
7. Manage Your Newsletter Subscription

Quote of the day:
"The shaft of the arrow had been feathered with one of the eagle's own plumes. We often give our enemies the means of our own destruction." -- Aesop


1. Editor's Note: iPhone Could Take Mobile Music Market, Warner Music CEO Warns

Warner Music CEO Edgar Bronfman Jr. walked into the 3GSM World Congress on Wednesday and pointed right at the pink elephant in the room: the iPhone. Bronfman warned the industry that if it cannot improve mobile music services, it could lose the market to Apple. Bronfman said that while there are millions of music phones on the global market, only 8.8% of users of these handsets have ever downloaded a music track over the air. Why? Because carrier mobile music services are too expensive and too hard to use.

Ouch. Score one for Apple.

"Apple has raised the bar in terms of what users expect," Bronfman said.

While that may be the case, Apple has yet to, you know, actually release a working mobile phone, much less a fully usable version of iTunes that works over the air on a carrier network.

The wireless industry here in Barcelona has had mixed reactions to the iPhone. On one hand, many execs are clearly scared Apple will steal the mobile content market. On the other hand, some insiders remain confident that Apple's first iPhones will be far from flawless, because of the company's inexperience with making cell phones. What's your take? Weigh in with your opinions and catch up on all the 3GSM coverage in the new Over The Air blog.

Stephen Wellman
swellman@cmp.com
www.informationweek.com


2. Today's Top Story: Viruses

The Love Bug: Valentine's Day Virus Strikes
Subject lines used in the attack are many and varied, but all pose as a romantic message, according to Sophos.


3. Breaking News

Firefox Tops 300 Million Downloads But Loses Market Share
It's not clear from a recent survey whether Firefox lost market share to Microsoft or Apple.

Microsoft Issues Warning On Daylight-Saving Time Software Flaw
Microsoft says the Y2K-like implications of the change in the start of daylight-saving time means computer users need to parry like its 1999.

SCO Can't Find Groklaw Blogger, Blames IBM
SCO believes that Jones doesn't exist and is actually a composite character invented by IBM's legal department, according to an insider at SCO.

When It Comes To Broadband, U.S. Plays Follow The Leader
The United States often views itself as a paragon of technology innovation and deployment. In some cases, that view is correct, but not when it comes to broadband deployment, where the country lags considerably behind other major nations. Here's why.

Samsung Reveals Ultrathin Cell Phone
The phone includes a camera, large displays, and support for music and video playback technology.

RightNow Proves It Isn't Just The Other Salesforce.com
RightNow 8 uses a small piece of downloadable software so the client has a little more intelligence than a Web browser.

When It Comes To ID Theft, Where You Live Matters
Study shows identity fraud is worse for people living in certain areas, like New York, Arizona, and California. But don't feel too safe if you live in a rural area, either.

Microsoft Settles Iowa Class-Action Lawsuit
The class-action suit claimed Microsoft overcharged consumers and businesses as much as $453 million over a 12-year period.

Better Business Bureau Spoofed In Phishing Scam
The agency is warning people of a spoofing scam that is using the Better Business Bureau name and a false e-mail address to lure users to click on links and connect with malicious Web sites.

EBay Pleased With Yahoo Ads, As Google Tests Start
The online auction site is ratcheting up its use of Yahoo search advertising to help boost buyer activity, after initial U.S. testing produced positive results.

All Our Latest News


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-----------------------------------------


4. The Latest Security Blog Posts
http://www.informationweek.com/blog/security/

Combating The Black Market In Personal Data
Be afraid, be very afraid -- but read this cover story on the hacker economy anyway. It will both fascinate and scare the pants off you at the same time, as it details how our personal identities and financial histories are harvested, dissected in online chop shops, and sold in multipack bundles to anyone willing to fork over a small investment in cash in return for making a big score in hours or days. (If you read nothing else, check out the price list for your personal data.)

Buy This Shampoo Or You'll Never See Your Data Again
While researching the hacker economy for Monday's InformationWeek lead feature story, I came across a lot of clever and devious tricks that cybercriminals use to lie, cheat, and steal their way through life. But none was as bizarre as a cyberransom scam I came across in my reporting. If you haven't had your daily dose of weird today, keep reading.

A Walk Through Cybercrime's Underworld
What's a piece of data worth? It's not too hard to find out. Just go to one of the dozens of online marketplaces where stolen credit card numbers, PINs, and Social Security numbers can be purchased -- individually or in bundles -- starting at just a few dollars. A few dollars is all that's needed to ruin someone's credit rating, drive up his debt, and make him question whether to trust you with his information next time.


5. White Papers: The Impact of SOX

Management Alert: The Sarbanes-Oxley Act Will Affect Your Enterprise
Many executives are eager for insights on what the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 will really mean for their enterprises. The manner in which companies approach business intelligence, corporate performance management, and records management systems will be affected as a result of Sarbanes-Oxley. This report will help you better understand the questions you should be asking and the methodologies and management systems you should put in place.


6. Get More Out Of InformationWeek

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