Infrastructure // PC & Servers
News
6/19/2012
01:20 PM
Connect Directly
Google+
LinkedIn
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%
Repost This

Google Battles YouTube-To-MP3 Conversion Website

Google says it's just enforcing its terms of service, but YouTube-MP3.org founder Philip Matesanz insists Google's user contract doesn't apply.

Google has threatened legal action against YouTube-MP3.org, a website that converts the audio tracks of YouTube videos into downloadable MP3 files.

The website's founder, Philip Matesanz, posted an appeal for assistance and insists that recording streamed files for personal use is legal in Germany, where his website is based.

Google characterizes the issue as a simple terms of service (TOS) violation, something the company deals with on a regular basis. "We have always taken violations of our terms of service seriously, and will continue to enforce our terms of service against sites that violate them," a YouTube spokesperson said via email.

On that basis, the case seems to be fairly clear cut. YouTube's TOS state: "You shall not download any Content unless you see a 'download' or similar link displayed by YouTube on the Service for that Content. You shall not copy, reproduce, distribute, transmit, broadcast, display, sell, license, or otherwise exploit any Content for any other purposes without the prior written consent of YouTube or the respective licensors of the Content. YouTube and its licensors reserve all rights not expressly granted in and to the Service and the Content."

[ Read Google Sees Surge In Censorship Demands. ]

However, Matesanz maintains that his site does not use the YouTube API, so he is not bound by the API TOS, and he insists that YouTube's general TOS (excerpted above) doesn't apply either.

"This TOS has nothing to say about audio extraction but forbids [making] YouTube videos available for download, and that's something I don't do since I just provide the audio stream," he wrote in an email.

While users of Matesanz's website appear to violate YouTube's TOS by downloading YouTube content in the absence of a download button, YouTube-MP3.org might conceivably claim not to be involved in downloading. But it's hard to see how YouTube's lawyers couldn't make the case that YouTube-MP3.org is copying and reproducing YouTube content in contravention of the TOS.

However, Matesanz insists that YouTube's general TOS does not apply to those who don't have YouTube accounts. "In Germany, it's the case that you are not bound to a contract (TOS) as long as you haven't accepted it," he said. "YouTube is a public broadcasting site, you don't need to accept [its] TOS to use [its] service and therefore I am not bound to it, like every user that is not registered and hasn't agreed [to] the TOS."

Moreover, Matesanz claims that German law permits personal copying of broadcast content. "There was [an] online service that ripped the TV stream from satellite and the users could download it then," he explains. "The respective TV station sued the service provider but our highest court has ruled that his service is not any different than a hardware-box you connect to your TV and rip the signal with it instead. It's the same situation for my service as well."

An article published in Die Welt last year supports Matesanz's argument. It says that German law allows both the recording of digital radio broadcasts and the downloading of YouTube videos.

Kurt Opsahl, senior staff attorney with the Electronic Frontier Foundation, said in a phone interview that he couldn't immediately evaluate Matesanz's claims about German law. In the United States, he said, most cases on the applicability of TOS agreements focus on whether there was an affirmative act, like a click on a button, to signify assent. He says there are also what's known as browse-wrap contracts, that assert the user agrees to the terms by using the site, but adds this is harder to prove.

Previous
1 of 2
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Jeff184
50%
50%
Jeff184,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/3/2012 | 10:51:29 PM
re: Google Battles YouTube-To-MP3 Conversion Website
FYI... to anyone interested in hearing more on this same topic, I also found this to be an interesting read http://www.real.com/resources/...
EBo
50%
50%
EBo,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/27/2012 | 5:12:57 PM
re: Google Battles YouTube-To-MP3 Conversion Website
Your article seems to be solely focused on two companieas (as would expect on Information weeek), but you are missing the most important point of what Google is doing, protecting the rights and property of artists!

Like millions of other musicians and songwriters who don't have record deals, I use youtube to post my songs for the world to hear. If someone downloads a youtube video and "grabs" the music from the video, they are stealing. This is absolutely no differnent then walking into a store and taking a CD without paying for it.

Not to mention, the millions of "signed" and well know artists who often have their songs, posted by others to video. Making them available to steal.

Here is a related article over the recent blog post you may have heard.

http://thetrichordist.wordpres...
Server Market Splitsville
Server Market Splitsville
Just because the server market's in the doldrums doesn't mean innovation has ceased. Far from it -- server technology is enjoying the biggest renaissance since the dawn of x86 systems. But the primary driver is now service providers, not enterprises.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Elite 100 - 2014
Our InformationWeek Elite 100 issue -- our 26th ranking of technology innovators -- shines a spotlight on businesses that are succeeding because of their digital strategies. We take a close at look at the top five companies in this year's ranking and the eight winners of our Business Innovation awards, and offer 20 great ideas that you can use in your company. We also provide a ranked list of our Elite 100 innovators.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Audio Interviews
Archived Audio Interviews
GE is a leader in combining connected devices and advanced analytics in pursuit of practical goals like less downtime, lower operating costs, and higher throughput. At GIO Power & Water, CIO Jim Fowler is part of the team exploring how to apply these techniques to some of the world's essential infrastructure, from power plants to water treatment systems. Join us, and bring your questions, as we talk about what's ahead.