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8/17/2005
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Patricia Keefe
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Weird News For The Wired, Part II

In This Issue:
1. Editor's Note: Weird News For The Wired, Part II
2. Today's Top Story: All The Buzz About Microsoft Operating Systems
    - What's New In Windows Vista Beta? Security, IT Tools, And Tabbed Browsing
    Related Stories:
    - Poll: When will your company begin implementing Microsoft's Vista operating system?
    - Windows Vista Beta Arrives
    - Gartner To XP Users: Don't Bother Testing Vista Beta 1
    - Microsoft Releases Windows Vista Beta 1
    - Microsoft Releases Limited Beta Of IE7 For Windows XP
    - Odd Byte: Microsoft's Newest Operating System May Face Trademark Trouble
3. Breaking News
    - E-Mail Analysis Is Key To Catching Terrorists And Corporate Crooks
    - Cisco 'Cover-Up' Ignites Security Controversy
    - Security Vendors Offer More Cash For Bugs
    - Broadband Bill Would Deregulate Video Services, Spur VoIP
    - Sun Inks Largest Java Deal Ever With GM
    - Analysis: Intel's New Fab Part Of Plan To Combat AMD
    - FCC Nominees On The Way
    - British Hacker Appears In Court To Fight U.S. Extradition Request
    - Security Researchers Share Crackers' Insider Tips
    - The Five Biggest VoIP 'Gotchas'
    - AOL Tests Mobile Search Engine
    - 'Universal' Memory Seen Emerging As Top Storage Chip
4. In Depth: Going Mobile
    - Travel The World, Stay Connected
    - Travelers Feel 'Empowered' By Online Search
    - Review: Set Yourself Free With Wireless iPod Headset
    - Tech Tips: What To Take With You On The Road
    - How-To: 10 Top Tips For Mobile Security
    - Another Use For Wi-Fi: Finding Stolen Laptops
    - SmartAdvice: Managing Wireless Risk Part Of Overall Security
5. Voice Of Authority: Avian Flu, Sweaty Shirts, And Love-Struck Bloggers
6. White Papers: Why Mobile Projects Fail
7. Get More Out Of InformationWeek
8. Manage Your Newsletter Subscription

Quote of the day: A.M. Blues
"Early-morning cheerfulness can be extremely obnoxious." -- William Feather

"The brain is a wonderful organ. It starts working the moment you get up in the morning and does not stop until you get into the office." -- Robert Frost

"The afternoon knows what the morning never suspected." -- Cousin Woodman


1. Editor's Note: Weird News For The Wired, Part II

It's summer. The tide is high, the humidity unrelenting, and the news keeps producing more twists as the weeks roll by. For your summer reading, I offer up a quick tour of some of the more recent weird news for the wired:

Talk about hiking up the distraction meter. Motorola has teamed up with Oakley on a combination sunglasses/cell-phone headset aimed at hands-free driving. Supposedly you can cut the glare while chewing the fat safely. I dunno, you still have to take your hands off the wheel and fiddle with small buttons--now dangerously near your line of vision. And at $295, these glasses should offer X-ray vision, or at least a video link to whoever is calling. Already I can see a major drawback looming on the horizon: figuring out where you left the darn things.

Understandably, there's a move afoot to tax porn. If you want to tax Internet commerce, it certainly makes as much sense to start there as it does to not let that revenue slip away. Sex sells, but it really sizzles online, where I'm pretty sure it remains the leading (or close to it) producer of revenue. But why stop there. Heck, let's tax spam while we're at it. Other than death, I doubt there are two more sure-fire sources of tax dollars today: They won't go away, they're available everywhere, and they seem to rake in the dough.

Speaking of revenue, if you like to tinker under the hood of software programs and you want to supplement your income, take note: Several security vendors are offering cash on the barrel for your bug reports. That's one way to rally the troops to fight for good against evil! It's not just that security vendors want to be the first to know about these things, as noted in our story this week. Increasingly, hackers are targeting the very software we buy to protect ourselves. Payments alleged to range from $100 to as much as $5,000 for serial contributors may be just the thing to turn the technically astute away from mindlessly surfing the Web at work and onto dissecting software instead of building or maintaining it. Perhaps the really motivated will even create a few of these bugs, just so they can report them.

By the time I saw the story on how crooks have turned to E-greetings in order to con the unsuspecting into downloading malicious code onto their computers, I was already well aware of this tricky trend, having received several such E-mails myself. But who hasn't received one of those often-fun cards (legitimately) from a friend, co-worker, or loved one? You have to wonder what this is going to mean for the online card sites. My initial thought was to send them a sympathy card. But then I realized they'd just think it was a trick E-mail and never open it.

I hope you'll open the link to my blog entry and read about the rest of the truly weird and twisted IT news that has crossed our desks this hazy, hot season. These stories are all the proof I need that the heat has gotten to everyone!

Patricia Keefe
pkeefe@cmp.com
www.informationweek.com


2. Today's Top Story: All The Buzz About Microsoft's Operating Systems

What's New In Windows Vista Beta? Security, IT Tools, And Tabbed Browsing
The new beta incorporates beefed-up security and tools for IT managers, as well as the first public look at Internet Explorer 7. The IE7 beta for Windows XP will be available simultaneously.

Related Stories:
Poll: When will your company begin implementing Microsoft's Vista operating system?

Windows Vista Beta Arrives
Microsoft has to prove that Vista's visual polish can make PCs easier to use and close a perceived elegance gap with Apple Computer's Mac OS X.

Gartner To XP Users: Don't Bother Testing Vista Beta 1
Research firm Gartner has weighed in with recommendations to enterprises about dabbling with the first beta of Microsoft Windows Vista, telling many to wait for later previews before investing time and effort.

Microsoft Releases Windows Vista Beta 1
Microsoft has reached what it deems to be a significant milestone in the development of its next version of Windows--the first beta release--but partners are largely unimpressed with the unfinished code.

Microsoft Releases Limited Beta Of IE7 For Windows XP
The tabbed-browser beta went out to 10,000 testers already lined up for Windows Vista beta 1, as well as 500,000 members of Microsoft's TechNet and MSDN programs.

Odd Byte: Microsoft's Newest Operating System May Face Trademark Trouble
The name "Vista" is being used in numerous computer products, leaving some to wonder if Microsoft is setting itself up for some court battles.


3. Breaking News

E-Mail Analysis Is Key To Catching Terrorists And Corporate Crooks
Spotfire, financed in part by a CIA technology incubator, is introducing a tool for uncovering patterns and relationships in information extracted from E-mail.

Cisco 'Cover-Up' Ignites Security Controversy
Attendees at the Black Hat security conference say that Cisco attempted to censor a talk about vulnerabilities in its products, which led to the resignation of a prominent researcher.

Security Vendors Offer More Cash For Bugs
Security vendor TippingPoint says it will pay researchers and hackers for information on software security vulnerabilities, while rival iDefense says it will double the bounty it pays for vulnerability information.

Broadband Bill Would Deregulate Video Services, Spur VoIP
The proposed law in the U.S. Senate would roll back current restrictions on video services and ensure access to voice over IP.

Sun Inks Largest Java Deal Ever With GM
General Motors will use Sun Java Enterprise System to build a companywide services-oriented architecture.

Analysis: Intel's New Fab Part Of Plan To Combat AMD
Intel's plan to build a new 300-mm fab has little to do with future PC growth, says an analyst who posits that the announcement is part of a major plan to play catch-up and gain a competitive edge over rival Advanced Micro Devices.

FCC Nominees On The Way
Analysts at Legg Mason see Bush aides and Southern pols as potential FCC nominees, with announcements on the way soon--along with a possible confirmation struggle.

British Hacker Appears In Court To Fight U.S. Extradition Request
Gary McKinnon is accused of infiltrating U.S. military computers, although officials have said no classified material was obtained.

Security Researchers Share Crackers' Insider Tips
Hackers are increasingly interested in digging up dirt on enterprise antivirus software. A pair of security researchers explains why customers should worry.

The Five Biggest VoIP 'Gotchas'
Deploying VoIP on your network can be a tricky business, but if you take into account the five big dangers we detail in this article it should be smoother sailing.

AOL Tests Mobile Search Engine
America Online's new service automatically adapts Web-search results pages to view on smart phones and PDAs.

'Universal' Memory Seen Emerging As Top Storage Chip
This class of chips may well grab 80% of the market ultimately, one researcher says, because of its speed, density, low cost of manufacture, and other desirable features.

All our latest news

And in video: The News Show's John Soat has his usual offbeat take on the latest IT headlines. Watch The News Show

In Wednesday's episode:

John Soat Plays Headline Psychic

Elena Malykhina On Bluetooth In The Shade

Ivan Schneider Has An Antitrust Primer

Stephanie Stahl On The Technology Of Lance Armstrong


----- The latest research, polls, and tools -----

Security Lowdown
Participate in InformationWeek's Global Information Security Survey and in return a copy of the study's research report is yours for free.

Money Concerns
Find out the value of your IT qualifications in InformationWeek Research's National IT Salary Study.

-----------------------------------------


4. In Depth: Going Mobile

Travel The World, Stay Connected
Traveling overseas? Before you go, read our expert tips for staying in touch from anywhere in the world.

Travelers Feel 'Empowered' By Online Search
Travelers are searching multiple Web sites for airfares and hotel rates, and feel empowered by their ability to obtain prices and make purchases online, a research firm said Wednesday.

Review: Set Yourself Free With Wireless iPod Headset
The new Logitech Wireless Headphones for iPod are easy to set up, let you range widely, and--surprise!--sound really great. Although they could have been designed more for comfort, we still recommend them.

Tech Tips: What To Take With You On The Road
Hardware such as a portable Wi-Fi routers and digital projectors can make travel more pleasant and productive. Here are some things to make sure to put in your suitcase next to the toothbrush and the laptop computer.

How-To: 10 Top Tips For Mobile Security
We explore 10 on-the-road scenarios to test your security savvy.

Another Use For Wi-Fi: Finding Stolen Laptops
Skyhook Wireless has developed technology that uses Wi-Fi to find stolen mobile devices--a positive step in the war against identity thieves and other cybercriminals.

SmartAdvice: Managing Wireless Risk Part Of Overall Security
Manage security for cell phones and PDAs proactively, The Advisory Council says. Also, telecommuting is a benefit to the company and employees when it's managed correctly.


5. Voice Of Authority

Blog: Avian Flu, Sweaty Shirts, And Love-Struck Bloggers
Things got wild and wooly at Stanford University last week when tech author, supply-sider, and former Nixon speechwriter George Gilder squared off against Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers director and Sun Microsystems co-founder Bill Joy over whether technology is making us safer. The panel discussion turned into a raucous, chaotic slugfest of theories and barbs, forcing the moderator to referee, a third panelist to hang on for the ride, and bloggers into overdrive, says Aaron Ricadela.


6. White Papers: Mobile Projects

The Top 5 Reasons Mobile Projects Fail, And What You Can Do About It
The rise of a mobile workforce is changing the rules of engagement in the corporate world. Companies are staking their competitive strategies on keeping their information workers connected. Learn more about how to leverage mobile computing in your organization.


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