Other
Commentary
6/28/2006
10:36 AM
Commentary
Commentary
Commentary
Connect Directly
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

What's Missing From Vista And Coming From Intel

In This Issue:
1. Editor's Note: Upping The Ante On Data Collection
2. Today's Top Story
     - What's Been Yanked From Vista, And When
     - WinFS Decision Shows New Thinking At Microsoft
     - Vista/Office Wonderland?
     - Microsoft Offers Online Demo Of Office 2007
3. Breaking News
     - Intel Dual-Core Itanium Due In July
     - Security Software Slaps Internet Explorer In 'Sandbox' To Ward Off Threats
     - Microsoft Makes Anti-Piracy Tool Less Intrusive
     - In-Flight Calling Takes Off, Sputters, Descends In U.S., Climbs In Europe
     - Red Hat CEO Bemoans State Of Education, Tech Talent Pool
     - Data Brokers, Their Customers Spark Congress' Ire
     - Wireless Firms Agree On Rules For Mobile Web Sites
     - EDS Wins $700 Million Bank Of America Contract
     - Oracle Releases PeopleSoft Enterprise 9
     - Symantec Unveils Anti-Phishing Suite
     - Review Roundup: Five Low-Cost 19-Inch LCD Displays
     - Researcher Finds Flaw In Cisco's Access Control Server
     - Forensics Expert Traces Digital Trail To Defendant In UBS Sabotage
4. Grab Bag
     - Intel Starts To Push Back (BusinessWeek)
     - IPizz, Podaholics, Podestrians (Wirednews.com)
     - 15 Tips For A Better Business Trip (Business 2.0)
5. In Depth: High-Tech Woes
     - Intel Sells Unit To Marvell For $600 Million
     - Nortel Cuts 1,100 Jobs, Pension Plan To Trim Costs
     - Symantec Lays Off 80, Drops SGS, SNS Appliance Lines
     - Novell's New CEO Isn't Talking Up A New Game Plan
     - SCO Offers Cash And Cars To Attract Unix Developers
     - 'Teardown' Analysis Of HD DVD Player Shows Toshiba Taking Big Loss
6. Voice Of Authority
     - AMD Vs. Intel: Analysis And Forecast
7. White Papers
     - Ensuring Data Protection For Growing Businesses
8. Get More Out Of InformationWeek
9. Manage Your Newsletter Subscription

Quote of the Day:
"Never fight an inanimate object." — P. J. O'Rourke


1. Editor's Note: Upping The Ante On Data Collection

So much about the overall issue and recent incidents of data loss are astounding that it's hard to know where to start. One good place is the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse, which offers up some sobering statistics on stolen data: Since Feb. 15, 2005, there have been over 200 data breaches (with some companies starring as repeat offenders) affecting the data of 88,399,953 individuals. At least that's what's been reported.

Outrageously, Congress has been dragging its feet and blowing hot and cold on the data protection issue for over a year. The intelligence community has supposedly quashed two pending bills, while reports have emerged that law enforcement makes use of data brokers, who everyone knows tend to obtain their data illegally, often through a form of impersonation called pretexting. (Heck, I'm surprised data brokers don't just pay people to steal corporate laptops. It would be cheaper and, apparently, easier.) A congressional hearing held on the practice of data brokering was shocked—just shocked—to conclude last week that there's no data that can be kept private! Having established the obvious, I'm sure they'll probably go back to sleep.

Meanwhile, on the corporate side, I don't know which is more arrogant: AIG, for waiting three months before starting to notify the roughly 97,000 consumers whose personal data was exposed following the theft of a company laptop in March, or AT&T, for informing its video and online customers that it can do anything it wants with the data it has collected on those users.

In the case of AIG, I'm not sure how the insurer plans to rationalize this egregiously late notification, but let's hope it isn't confusing it with some aborted notion of customer service. Three months is a lifetime in personal identification theft.

As for AT&T, it once again brings to surface the long-nagging issue of just whose data is it anyway?

Your medical, educational, professional, and financial records; what you read, watch, and drive; where you travel, what you buy, and where you wander online—is this your data, or does it belong to the companies that collect it, one way or another?

In a June 7 Editor's Note, I called for a uniform bill of consumer data rights, as well as a uniform agreement on best practices for companies and law enforcement to follow in the event of a data breach. It looks like I'm not the only one who thinks we need something like this. A week ago a dozen companies banded together under the umbrella of the Consumer Privacy Legislative Forum and issued a call to Congress to pass a comprehensive federal consumer privacy law that would cover the handling of personal data.

The group is looking for a "legal framework" that will straddle the line between protecting consumers from inappropriate collection and misuse of personal information and allowing legitimate companies to use data on people in conducting business.

I would love to know its definition of "using data on people in conducting business." But hey, it's a start. It's just a matter of time before people start suing the pants off corporations for either collecting the data in the first place, not protecting it adequately, or not monitoring who they're making it available to. The CPLF members are just looking ahead, and maybe this is the kick in the pants Congress needs. Let's hope so.

Back to my data rights bill and the issue of data ownership, which is the one key ingredient I left out. Which got me to thinking, if Congress is right—and of course it is—that we have no prayer of keeping any of our personal data private, and since it's obvious that we can't stop legitimate and illegitimate collectors and buyers of our data, then maybe it's time to consider royalties.

That's right—data royalties. Every time someone accesses or collects a piece of your data, they have to pay you for it. Everyone else is trying to make money off it, so why not cut the public in on a piece of the action? What's the fair market value of all this data anyway? It's got to be worth something—too many people are trying too hard, legally and illegally, to collect it and use it.

As silly as it may seem, the motive behind this suggestion is not. It's high time the public got something of value back from the wholesale invasion of our privacy besides spam, junk mail, spying, and identity theft. And if it's not going to be protection, then money just might be the way to go. You can tell me what you think by leaving a comment on the blog entry for this note.

Patricia Keefe
pkeefe@cmp.com


2. Today's Top Story

What's Been Yanked From Vista, And When
WinFS, the Nomad scripting language, a new PC firmware standard—all were once upon a time features in the operating system.

WinFS Decision Shows New Thinking At Microsoft
Microsoft's decision to kill plans to ship its next-generation file system as a standalone application probably reflects changes in the software giant.

Vista/Office Wonderland?
Since neither Vista nor Office 2007 will be generally available until early next year, the company will offer promotions to avoid holiday sales season blues.

Microsoft Offers Online Demo Of Office 2007
The online demo works without downloading and installing the software—but you have to be running Internet Explorer to give it a try.


3. Breaking News

Intel Dual-Core Itanium Due In July
Intel is already shipping the chip, code-named "Montecito," as part of the company's effort to capture the high ground in the server market.

Security Software Slaps Internet Explorer In 'Sandbox' To Ward Off Threats
GreenBorder Pro uses virtualization-like technologies to separate IE from the rest of the system. That way, if malicious software does execute, it doesn't actually touch the computer.

Microsoft Makes Anti-Piracy Tool Less Intrusive
The company upgraded its Windows Genuine Advantage tool to communicate less with Microsoft and upgraded its end-user license agreement to make it more clear what the tool does.

In-Flight Calling Takes Off, Sputters, Descends In U.S., Climbs In Europe
In-flight calling hit some turbulence this week when Boeing announced Monday that it's evaluating its unprofitable Connexion service, but the notion is still taking off in Europe.

Red Hat CEO Bemoans State Of Education, Tech Talent Pool
Red Hat CEO Matthew Szulik said Tuesday that it's tough to find well-qualified job candidates in the United States who also embrace the open-source movement's entrepreneurial values and culture of innovation.

Data Brokers, Their Customers Spark Congress' Ire
Last week's congressional hearings bring to light the fact that just about all personal information is for sale, and the issue lawmakers are wrangling with now is what to do about it.

Wireless Firms Agree On Rules For Mobile Web Sites
The World Wide Web Consortium has created 60 guidelines to help developers design sites that are easy to use on cell phones, including a way of making the content appear right at the top of a cell phone screen, allowing users to avoid scrolling past multiple navigation links.

EDS Wins $700 Million Bank Of America Contract
This is the second time EDS has been called on to integrate an acquired company for Bank of America.

Oracle Releases PeopleSoft Enterprise 9
A series of three software modules, PeopleSoft Enterprise 9 marks one of Oracle's three major 2006 initiatives following its acquisition of PeopleSoft, Siebel Systems, and many other smaller software makers.

Symantec Unveils Anti-Phishing Suite
Norton Confidential, which will enter beta testing sometime this summer, will include anti-phishing black lists, heuristics-based detectors, additional site authentication cues, and password encryption.

Review Roundup: Five Low-Cost 19-Inch LCD Displays
LCD displays have come so far down in price that they're fast replacing CRT monitors on most desktops. Which LCD is right for you? Here are five interesting (and economical) possibilities.

Researcher Finds Flaw In Cisco's Access Control Server
Secure ACS, software that combines authentication, access, and policy controls, includes a hole that could enable attackers to gain administrative access to the Web-based interface used to manage network devices, the researcher says.

Forensics Expert Traces Digital Trail To Defendant In UBS Sabotage
Planning for success, the perpetrator of the UBS attack installed the trigger mechanism of the logic bomb that brought down the company's network four years ago, twice on every server it targeted.

All Our Latest News

Watch The News Show

In the current episode:

John Soat With 'PC Spells Love'
PC failure rates improve, Steve Jobs plans to demo the new Apple OS, and teachers are using computers to teach.

Elena Malykhina With 'The Next Yellow Pages'
A new business online directory flips the page on traditional yellow pages.

Chris Murphy With 'Unreachable'
Chris rants about the meaning of "vacation."

----- The latest research, polls, and tools -----

Download PDFs Of InformationWeek's Top Stories
Visit InformationWeek Downloads to get all of InformationWeek's biggest and best articles all in one place. Presented in an easy-to-read PDF format, they'll help you analyze and make purchasing decisions for today's technology solutions.

Job Satisfaction
Are you satisfied with your job? Find out how other IT professionals feel with InformationWeek Research's "National IT Salary Study." The report covers job satisfaction as well as salaries and compensation, making it a valuable tool for IT managers, staffers, and recruiters.

IT Salary And Compensation By Region
Evaluate your pay with that of your peers with our free and confidential online tool. Featuring more than 20 job functions and tracking IT salary and compensation across 20 metropolitan areas, InformationWeek Research's 2006 IT Salary Adviser makes it easy to compare your salary and compensation.

-----------------------------------------

4. Grab Bag

Intel Starts To Push Back (BusinessWeek)
After months of losing ground to archrival AMD, the longtime chip king has a salvo of counterattacks ready. The Xeon 5100 is its first shot.

IPizz, Podaholics, Podestrians (Wirednews.com)
Cult of Macintosh: The iPod has inspired a plethora of new urban slang, and some of it is pretty funny.

15 Tips For A Better Business Trip (Business 2.0)
Want to make your travels faster, cheaper, and far more comfortable? We've got the answers.


5. In Depth: High Tech Woes

Intel Sells Unit To Marvell For $600 Million
The unit, part of Intel's communications chip business, makes and sells processors for advanced cell phones and personal digital assistants. The business has been trying to turn a profit for years.

Nortel Cuts 1,100 Jobs, Pension Plan To Trim Costs
Nortel, which this month reported a wider first-quarter loss amid higher expenses and sluggish sales, will eliminate about 1,900 positions around the world and create 800 new ones in "centers of excellence" in low-cost Mexico and Turkey.

Symantec Lays Off 80, Drops SGS, SNS Appliance Lines
Rather than produce the hardware and software for security appliances, Symantec will focus on the latter and look for partners to take on the hardware.

Novell's New CEO Isn't Talking Up A New Game Plan
Hovsepian has moved up fast within the company. Now he's got his turn in charge.

SCO Offers Cash And Cars To Attract Unix Developers
The company president says lawsuits against Linux users shouldn't affect its Unix business.

'Teardown' Analysis Of HD DVD Player Shows Toshiba Taking Big Loss
ISuppli ripped apart one of the devices and found that components cost $674, far exceeding the $499 retail price. Add in manufacturing, cables, remote control, and packaging, and the cost could easily exceed $700.


6. Voice Of Authority

AMD Vs. Intel: Analysis And Forecast
As competition between Intel and AMD heats up with the much-anticipated release of Intel's new "Woodcrest" server CPU, manufactured using 65 nm technology, Max Fomitchev couldn't resist the temptation to analyze and forecast possible outcomes of these new developments.


7. White Papers

Four Advantages Of An Appliance-Based File Transfer System
Among on-demand secure file transfer solutions, it makes sense for most organizations to consider the use of a file transfer appliance—a dedicated appliance that can solve the problems associated with conventional file transfer processes that are currently handled through e-mail or FTP-based solutions.


8. Get More Out Of InformationWeek

Try InformationWeek's RSS Feed

Discover all InformationWeek's sites and newsletters

Recommend This Newsletter To A Friend
Do you have friends or colleagues who might enjoy this newsletter? Please forward it to them and point out the subscription page.


9. Manage Your Newsletter Subscription

To unsubscribe from, subscribe to, or change your E-mail address for this newsletter, please visit the InformationWeek Subscription Center.

Note: To change your E-mail address, please subscribe your new address and unsubscribe your old one.

Keep Getting This Newsletter
Don't let future editions of InformationWeek Daily go missing. Take a moment to add the newsletter's address to your anti-spam white list:
InfoWeek@update.informationweek.com

If you're not sure how to do that, ask your administrator or ISP. Or check your anti-spam utility's documentation. Thanks.

We take your privacy very seriously. Please review our Privacy Policy.

InformationWeek Daily Newsletter
A free service of InformationWeek and the TechWeb Network.
Copyright (c) 2006 CMP Media LLC
600 Community Drive
Manhasset, N.Y. 11030

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
The Business of Going Digital
The Business of Going Digital
Digital business isn't about changing code; it's about changing what legacy sales, distribution, customer service, and product groups do in the new digital age. It's about bringing big data analytics, mobile, social, marketing automation, cloud computing, and the app economy together to launch new products and services. We're seeing new titles in this digital revolution, new responsibilities, new business models, and major shifts in technology spending.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek - July 21, 2014
Our new survey shows fed agencies focusing more on security, as they should, but they're still behind the times with cloud and overall innovation.
Flash Poll
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Archived InformationWeek Radio
In this special, sponsored radio episode we’ll look at some terms around converged infrastructures and talk about how they’ve been applied in the past. Then we’ll turn to the present to see what’s changing.
Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.