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Which Mobile Technologies Should You Bet On In 2006?

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In This Issue:
1. Editor's Note: Which Mobile Technologies Should You Bet On In 2006?
2. Today's Top Story
    - Google Video To Compete With Apple ITunes
    - Google Introduces Software Starter Kit For PCs
    - Google Adds Support To Viiv Technology
    - Motorola Plans Cell-Phone Google Feature
3. Breaking News
    - IT Services Experienced Strong Payroll Growth In 2005
    - Patched Windows Bug Will Be Danger For Months
    - FTC Nails Two Spyware Sellers For Tricking Users
    - A Rare Glimpse Into Richard Stallman's World
    - Microsoft Plans Two More Critical Patches Next Week
    - Xerox Taps Data Mining To Improve Sales Forecasts
    - Opinion: Wireless Technologies To Buy, Sell, And Hold In 2006
    - CA Acquisition Targets Application Management
4. Grab Bag
    - Microsoft Shuts Blog's Site After Complaints By Beijing
    - Howard Stern To Get $220M In Sirius Stock
    - Review: A New Palm Treo Uses Microsoft's Software, But It Doesn't Beat 650
5. In Depth: Consumer Electronics
    - Apple Sues To Save Its iPod
    - Yahoo Launches Content Service For Phones
    - Creative Labs Touts Internet Phone That Doesn't Require A PC
    - Commentary: What Is Viiv, Really?
    - Lenovo Launches 11-Hour Laptops
    - Intel Moves Into Entertainment Biz
    - Intel Tips Viiv, Yonah In Consumer Push
6. Voice Of Authority
    - It's Not The Size Of The Data Breach That Matters: All Of Your Customers Are Affected
7. White Papers
    - Getting To Virtual IT Resource
8. Get More Out Of InformationWeek
9. Manage Your Newsletter Subscription

Quote of the day:
"If this is coffee, please bring me some tea; but if this is tea, please bring me some coffee." -- Abraham Lincoln


1. Editor's Note: Which Mobile Technologies Should You Bet On In 2006?
I don't have a good track record with regard to predictions about mobile computing. This is probably because I am an immobile kind of guy. I work from a home office adjacent to my bedroom, so most days consist of getting up, going into the next room to work, staying there all day, then going to the other side of the house for supper and TV.

Unlike me, Dave Molta, of our sister magazine Network Computing, does know something about mobile technologies, and he has some predictions for which mobile technologies are likely to succeed in 2006. He likes 3G, RFID, and smart phones; thinks WiMax and municipal Wi-Fi will be disappointing; and is ambivalent about 802.11n.

Even I could see the sense of public-access Wi-Fi. There was a great deal of hooray when the first coffee shops enabled Wi-Fi access for their customers, even more when the Starbucks chain rolled it out nationwide, with some skeptics grumbling that it was all a fad.

But that was in 2002, and then discussion faded, and public-access Wi-Fi has quietly become something we all take for granted. We know if we're on the road traveling (and even I leave the house occasionally, if only to stock up on Diet Dr Pepper and Lean Cuisine frozen dinners), we can count on finding somewhere to pull over, open our laptop computers, and do a little work or recreational Web surfing.

Ron Miller writes about the business experiences of cafes and restaurants that install Wi-Fi for their customers. Miller explains that Wi-Fi puts butts in seats--and, while those butts are in seats, the hands and mouths attached to the butts are likely to buy and consume some coffee and Danish. Moreover, Wi-Fi users tend to come in when business is otherwise slow. The pick-up-a-cup-of-coffee-on-the-way-to-work crowd trickles off by about 9 a.m., but that's when the Wi-Fi users start coming in; they populate the cafes--and buy some stuff--in the otherwise quiet time between meals.

Public Wi-Fi is a very, very genteel and low-key aspect of capitalism. Businesses give something away, trusting that they'll get more back in return. For the consumer, nobody's hustling you to buy! buy! buy! every three minutes.

The frenetic activity of the bazaar or stock market are certainly invigorating, but there's also something nice about a quiet place where you can sit, work, think, and people-watch.

And you get coffee and chocolate, too. What could be better than that?

What do you think will be the hits and misses for mobile and wireless technology this year? And here's a question for owners of coffee shops, cafes, and other small restaurants: Do you offer public-access Wi-Fi?

Mitch Wagner
mwagner@cmp.com
www.informationweek.com


2. Today's Top Story

Google Video To Compete With Apple ITunes
Google will sell thousands of video downloads, including recent TV broadcasts of popular CBS shows and pro basketball games, as well as vintage episodes from old TV series. Google is trying to be more flexible than Apple's iTunes by allowing content owners to set their own prices.

Google Introduces Software Starter Kit For PCs
The "Google Pack" software bundle will include third-party apps such as the Firefox browser, Adobe Reader, Norton AntiVirus, and six of Google's own programs, including Desktop Search and the Picasa image-management tool.

Related Stories:
Google Adds Support To Viiv Technology
Intel will team with the search-engine company to make Google Video, a form of video on demand, accessible on Viiv computers.

Motorola Plans Cell-Phone Google Feature
Users will be able to launch the Google search engine by clicking on an icon, Motorola said.


3. Breaking News

IT Services Experienced Strong Payroll Growth In 2005
But employment in other IT industries remained flat.

Patched Windows Bug Will Be Danger For Months
Although Microsoft patched a major bug, the underlying vulnerability may haunt Windows users for the next six to eight months.

FTC Nails Two Spyware Sellers For Tricking Users
Two companies accused of deceiving computer users into believing their systems were infected with spyware have settled with the Federal Trade Commission.

A Rare Glimpse Into Richard Stallman's World
In a series of interviews, the founder of the Free Software Foundation discusses some of the thinking behind his crusades and achievements in promoting free and open software.

Microsoft Plans Two More Critical Patches Next Week
Microsoft may have released the Windows Meta File hot fix, but it has other patches still to come on Tuesday.

Xerox Taps Data Mining To Improve Sales Forecasts
Implementation of Rapid Insight analysis tool will free up Xerox's sales reps to spend more time with customers.

Opinion: Wireless Technologies To Buy, Sell, And Hold In 2006
Which wireless technologies will be hot in 2006? Wireless expert Dave Molta opines on WiMax, municipal Wi-Fi, RFID, and other hot topics.

CA Acquisition Targets Application Management
The $375 million purchase of Wily Technology is expected to provide CA customers with more tools to manage IT environments, from applications to infrastructure.

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4. Grab Bag: News You Need From Around The Web

Microsoft Shuts Blog's Site After Complaints By Beijing (New York Times)
The decision is the latest in a series of measures in which some of America's biggest technology companies have cooperated with the Chinese authorities to censor Web sites and curb dissent or free speech online as they seek access to China's booming Internet marketplace.

Howard Stern To Get $220M In Sirius Stock (The Washington Post)
Sirius Satellite Radio will give Howard Stern 34 million shares of stock--worth about $220 million at today's prices--because the company has met agreed-upon targets for gaining new subscribers under its 2004 deal with the shock jock.

Review: A New Palm Treo Uses Microsoft's Software, But It Doesn't Beat 650 (The Wall Street Journal--no registration required)
Palm's new Treo 700w uses Microsoft's Windows Mobile software, but despite some nice features, it's neither as easy to use nor as powerful as the Palm-based 650.


5. In Depth: Consumer Electronics

Apple Sues To Save Its iPod
Apple's suit against Burst.com is a pre-emptive strike over a patent dispute between the two companies.

Yahoo Launches Content Service For Phones
Anyone with a Yahoo account can have the customized data they now get through the Web portal load itself into whichever device they carry.

Creative Labs Touts Internet Phone That Doesn't Require A PC
Skype users will soon be able to make VoIP calls without the necessity of a PC, by connecting directly to a router.

Commentary: What Is Viiv, Really?
Dissatisfied with the catchall explanation "technology platform," columnist Peter Clarke wades through 12 Intel press releases in a bid for a better understanding and comes up empty.

Lenovo Launches 11-Hour Laptops
Lenovo revealed Thursday a pair of new ThinkPad notebooks that it says can run 11 hours without a charge when equipped with a second battery.

Intel Moves Into Entertainment Biz
Like everyone else at the Computer Electronics Show, chip kingpin Intel is trying to make its mark in the world of entertainment.

Intel Tips Viiv, Yonah In Consumer Push
With an eye on the consumer market, Intel debuted a dual-core processor, PC platform, and several content alliances that are supposed to provide the foundation for digital entertainment and wireless laptops.


6. Voice Of Authority

It's Not The Size Of The Data Breach That Matters; All Of Your Customers Are Affected
Tony Kontzer says: The oft-forgotten element of the endless procession of consumer data breaches is how companies manage the aftermath. It's an undertaking that can be summed by two words: damage control. And one company that found itself on the wrong end of a breach last month--Marriott Corp.--is only getting half of the effort right.


7. White Papers

Getting To Virtual IT Resource
This paper explores the reasons for outsourcing and shows that if it's done correctly, companies will reap huge benefits. It proposes criteria for selecting functions and projects for successful outsourcing. In addition, it identifies requirements for monitoring outsourcing arrangements.


8. Get More Out Of InformationWeek

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