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11/16/2012
11:23 AM
Jeff Bertolucci
Jeff Bertolucci
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10 Great Windows 8 Apps

Transitioning to Windows 8 isn't easy, but these apps can help.




Windows 8 has a dual personality. Its hybrid interface represents both the Windows of the future -- the slick, touch-oriented Start screen with its colorful Live Tiles -- and of the past, better known as the Windows Desktop.

The venerable Desktop has been around since Windows 95 (yes, 17 years ago), and for good reason: It's a mature UI that's well-suited for a keyboard-and-mouse PC. To borrow one of Apple's pet phrases: It just works. Unfortunately, the Desktop in Windows 8 is a little less capable than its predecessors. It lacks a Start menu, the starting point for finding local files and programs UI, and feels tacked on. Windows 8 novices, particularly those who've upgraded from earlier versions of Windows, will find themselves jumping between the new Start screen and the old Desktop to perform basic tasks.

If this sounds confusing, well, you'll probably have plenty of company as more users upgrade to Windows 8. Because by trying to be all things to all users -- it's a desktop OS! A mobile OS! -- Windows 8 is a big ol' mess.

Don't get me wrong. The new Windows 8 Start screen is wonderfully designed, particularly for multitouch tablets and hybrid tablet/laptop devices with keyboards, such as Microsoft's new Surface RT.

The problem is that the Windows 8 Start screen and the old-school Windows Desktop shouldn't coexist in the same OS. Each works very well on its own, but Microsoft made the mistake of cramming both in the same UI. The result is a design compromise that will please no one. (In fact, I didn't appreciate how polished the Windows Desktop truly was until I began using its crippled Windows 8 variant.)

To be fair, there's a lot to like in Windows 8, particularly if you spend the majority of your time navigating the new Start screen, running apps downloaded from the Windows Store, and avoiding the Desktop like the compromise solution that it is. The best way to achieve this is to buy a new Windows 8 PC or tablet, but leave your old Windows 7 machines unchanged.

Which raises an important question: Will most enterprises bother to upgrade to Windows 8, particularly when Windows 7 is so capable? There's a good chance many will not, as doing so could result in a litany of end user gripes, costly retraining sessions, and lost productivity.

If you plan to upgrade to Windows 8, click through the slideshow below. We selected 10 great apps and utilities from Microsoft's Windows Store, some of which will help ease the transition from earlier versions of Windows.


The Start menu -- the essential navigational tool that has graced the Windows UI from Windows 95 through Windows 7 -- is missing from Windows 8. Rather, the new Start screen is the go-to spot for finding apps and files. Longtime Windows users may struggle with the new paradigm, however, particularly if they decide to spend most of their time in the comfortable confines of the Desktop UI. One of the more annoying aspects of using Windows 8 is the need to switch back and forth between the Desktop to the Start screen to do simple stuff, such as searching the hard drive for a file or tracking down a legacy Windows program.

The solution: Install a third-party utility such as Classic Start 8, which brings a Windows 7-style Start menu to the Desktop. In addition to providing fast access to programs and files, it offers a faster way to shut down your PC than the multi-step Windows 8 method, which is a bit confusing.

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Windows 8: The Legacy Apps Question

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Windows 8: CIOs Get Enterprise Road Warrior




One of the more maddening aspects of the new Windows 8 Start screen is that lacks a clock that's visible at all times. Sure, you can always check the time by accessing the Charms bar, which brings up a time/date window in the lower-left corner of the screen. And if you're working in the Desktop UI, the time and date are still visible in the lower-right corner.

There's good news, though. The Windows Store has dozens of clock apps that run right on the Start screen. For instance, the free Jojuba Software Clock (pictured) is a handy, no-frills timepiece for the Start screen. Launch the app, and you'll see a gargantuan clock and calendar, as well as a stopwatch, timer and alarm.

RECOMMENDED READING

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8 Cool Windows 8 Tablets

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Windows 8: The Legacy Apps Question

Windows 8 App Developer Says Process Stinks

Windows 8: CIOs Get Enterprise Road Warrior


Microsoft bought Skype last year for a staggering $8.5 billion, so it's no surprise that Redmond would make an extra effort to fuse the ubiquitous VoIP service with Windows 8. A free download in the Windows Store, Skype integrates nicely with the new UI. For instance, when you pin a contact to the Start screen, you can click or tap that person's photo to start a video or voice call, a chat session or send an SMS text via Skype. And unlike Apple's insular iMessage and FaceTime apps, Skype works across multiple software platforms, including Windows, iOS, Mac and Android.

RECOMMENDED READING

Windows 8, RT Get First Security Fixes

Windows 8 Security Improvements Carry Caveats

Windows 8 Hardware Shopping Adventures

6 Reasons To Want Windows 8 Ultrabooks

Windows 8 Momentum: Will Pop-Up Stores Help?

8 Cool Windows 8 Tablets

Windows 8 Review: All About Touch

Windows 8: The Legacy Apps Question

Windows 8 App Developer Says Process Stinks

Windows 8: CIOs Get Enterprise Road Warrior


Skype may be the Microsoft's communications tool of choice for consumers, but Lync gets the nod for Redmond's enterprise clients. The new Lync app has been "reimagined" for the new Windows 8 UI, which means the capable communications app is optimized for touch, and features the sleek, clean look of the interface formerly known as Metro. Lync users can switch between IM, video or voice conferencing, or use all three at once. A free download from the Windows Store, the Lync app also snaps to the side of your screen, which is handy for referencing a website or another app during a demo. Lync requires Lync Server or an Office 365/Lync Online account to work.

RECOMMENDED READING

Windows 8, RT Get First Security Fixes

Windows 8 Security Improvements Carry Caveats

Windows 8 Hardware Shopping Adventures

6 Reasons To Want Windows 8 Ultrabooks

Windows 8 Momentum: Will Pop-Up Stores Help?

8 Cool Windows 8 Tablets

Windows 8 Review: All About Touch

Windows 8: The Legacy Apps Question

Windows 8 App Developer Says Process Stinks

Windows 8: CIOs Get Enterprise Road Warrior


Microsoft's entertainment-oriented app lets you use your Windows device -- probably a tablet or smartphone -- as a second screen to compliment your Xbox 360 activities. For instance, the Xbox SmartGlass app could display additional details on characters or locations for a TV show you're watching on the living room HDTV. SmartGlass also works with Windows Phone, Apple iOS and Android devices, and is clearly built for fun. This could change in a hurry, however, if enterprises find uses for the innovative technology. As InformationWeek's Paul McDougall points out, financial traders could use SmartGlass technology on mobile devices to view news and other metrics while making trades on a desktop display.

RECOMMENDED READING

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Windows 8 Hardware Shopping Adventures

6 Reasons To Want Windows 8 Ultrabooks

Windows 8 Momentum: Will Pop-Up Stores Help?

8 Cool Windows 8 Tablets

Windows 8 Review: All About Touch

Windows 8: The Legacy Apps Question

Windows 8 App Developer Says Process Stinks

Windows 8: CIOs Get Enterprise Road Warrior


Microsoft's note-taking tool has gotten a Windows 8-style makeover. Built to work with multiple devices, meaning tablets, smartphones and PCs, the free OneNote app lets you enter information by typing, drawing or writing. It conveniently saves your notes to your SkyDrive account as well. OneNote is integrated with Windows 8's search tool to help you find your notes quickly, and it can access to your device's camera (with your permission) for taking photos and adding them to your notes.

RECOMMENDED READING

Windows 8, RT Get First Security Fixes

Windows 8 Security Improvements Carry Caveats

Windows 8 Hardware Shopping Adventures

6 Reasons To Want Windows 8 Ultrabooks

Windows 8 Momentum: Will Pop-Up Stores Help?

8 Cool Windows 8 Tablets

Windows 8 Review: All About Touch

Windows 8: The Legacy Apps Question

Windows 8 App Developer Says Process Stinks

Windows 8: CIOs Get Enterprise Road Warrior




PC Monitor is an encrypted app for monitoring an IT environment remotely. It lets you perform a variety of administrative tasks from afar, such as viewing current CPU usage, available memory and status and uptime of all PCs on a network. It can monitor up to 5 computers for free. PC Monitor also has versions for other mobile platforms, including iOS, Android and Windows Phone. In addition, it supports a variety of server modules, including IIS, Active Directory, Exchange, SQL Server, Hyper-V and VMware.

RECOMMENDED READING

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Windows 8 Hardware Shopping Adventures

6 Reasons To Want Windows 8 Ultrabooks

Windows 8 Momentum: Will Pop-Up Stores Help?

8 Cool Windows 8 Tablets

Windows 8 Review: All About Touch

Windows 8: The Legacy Apps Question

Windows 8 App Developer Says Process Stinks

Windows 8: CIOs Get Enterprise Road Warrior


This free measurement converter works with a variety of weights, lengths, volumes and other units. Its scroll bar interface is really designed for touchscreens, but also works reasonably well with your mouse or trackpad. It makes some unusual measurements too. For instance, did you know that the Burj Khalifa, the tallest building in the world, is the equivalent of 32, 598.4 inches? Well, now you do.

RECOMMENDED READING

Windows 8, RT Get First Security Fixes

Windows 8 Security Improvements Carry Caveats

Windows 8 Hardware Shopping Adventures

6 Reasons To Want Windows 8 Ultrabooks

Windows 8 Momentum: Will Pop-Up Stores Help?

8 Cool Windows 8 Tablets

Windows 8 Review: All About Touch

Windows 8: The Legacy Apps Question

Windows 8 App Developer Says Process Stinks

Windows 8: CIOs Get Enterprise Road Warrior




For basic image editing, Fhotoroom is a good choice in a thinly-stocked Windows Store. It features 15 editing tools, including such crowd favorites as crop, rotate, sharpen, flip and mirror. Fhotoroom also includes 21 photo styles and 22 picture frames and borders. The paid version costs only $1.50 and supports photos larger than 3 MP -- an important consideration with today's pixel-packed cameras -- and provides access to additional filters and tools.

If you'd rather use a traditional Windows desktop app with more editing tools, there are plenty of free options available, including GIMP and Photoscape, as well as Web-based alternatives such as Google's Pixlr Editor.

RECOMMENDED READING

Windows 8, RT Get First Security Fixes

Windows 8 Security Improvements Carry Caveats

Windows 8 Hardware Shopping Adventures

6 Reasons To Want Windows 8 Ultrabooks

Windows 8 Momentum: Will Pop-Up Stores Help?

8 Cool Windows 8 Tablets

Windows 8 Review: All About Touch

Windows 8: The Legacy Apps Question

Windows 8 App Developer Says Process Stinks

Windows 8: CIOs Get Enterprise Road Warrior

Sometimes the best apps are the simplest ones. As we discussed earlier, Windows 8 is a significant departure from its predecessors, and longtime Windows users are bound to grow frustrated when trying to learn basic tasks, such as how to close Windows Store apps. (You don't have to close them, actually, but there's a way to do it.)

Windows 8 Cheat Keys is a great way to discover shortcut keys and other navigational tips for the new Start screen. Digitalmason.net's free app shows a few tips per day via toast notifications -- pop-up messages in the upper right corner of the screen -- and Live Tile updates. If you'd rather learn faster, simply launch the Cheat Keys app and scroll through the collection of tips.

RECOMMENDED READING

Windows 8, RT Get First Security Fixes

Windows 8 Security Improvements Carry Caveats

Windows 8 Hardware Shopping Adventures

6 Reasons To Want Windows 8 Ultrabooks

Windows 8 Momentum: Will Pop-Up Stores Help?

8 Cool Windows 8 Tablets

Windows 8 Review: All About Touch

Windows 8: The Legacy Apps Question

Windows 8 App Developer Says Process Stinks

Windows 8: CIOs Get Enterprise Road Warrior

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GuidoCG
50%
50%
GuidoCG,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/28/2013 | 5:23:44 AM
re: 10 Great Windows 8 Apps
Im a step closer in upgrading. Im breathing hard to get to the point of shifting to this new OS 8. Im excited!

www.spectra.com
John
50%
50%
John,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/25/2013 | 9:26:31 PM
re: 10 Great Windows 8 Apps
Yep I got a substantial speed boost from win8 on one of my old computers as well. However, I still spend most my time in desktop mode and for me the best app I've used in the last few months has been Aikin HyperSearch. It's fairly new, but hands down the most powerful search I've encountered for windows 8 or 7. http://www.grappledata.com/aik...
Edmond
50%
50%
Edmond,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/25/2012 | 2:06:15 PM
re: 10 Great Windows 8 Apps
Windows 8 is great, for me so we can make an app and get revenue from that, and for app I just want to share, #ANDATUBE, where you can get update music and movies hit list, and also browsing, streaming, and downloading #Youtube videos! here is the link

http://apps.microsoft.com/wind...
Jeff Bertolucci
50%
50%
Jeff Bertolucci,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/20/2012 | 5:20:41 PM
re: 10 Great Windows 8 Apps
I suspect the Desktop may go away altogether with the next major release of Windows. It's weirdly out of place in Win 8. Then again, I find myself spending 95% of my time using the Desktop rather than the Start shell. I'm wondering if other Win 7 upgraders are doing the same thing...
majenkins
50%
50%
majenkins,
User Rank: Ninja
11/19/2012 | 6:28:10 PM
re: 10 Great Windows 8 Apps
If I ever install a commercial version of Win 8, I tried both the consumer and release previews, I don't imagine I will go through the admittedly convoluted process of clicks necessary to shutdown the system. I suspect I will continue to just press Alt+F4 like have been doing in the previews.
VasyaPupkinsan
50%
50%
VasyaPupkinsan,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/19/2012 | 8:19:57 AM
re: 10 Great Windows 8 Apps
It is a memory HOG.

Surface 32GB is now to be renamed Surface 16GB.

And see how a clueless a..hole shill replies to this... their "trusty" SD cards card, never mind that SD are notoriously unreliable and slow as hell.
Kyllein
50%
50%
Kyllein,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/18/2012 | 7:13:40 PM
re: 10 Great Windows 8 Apps
Windows 8 appears to be a touch screen menu system adapted to PC's. While this may work for tablets and phones, the extra scrolling and the loss of perceived "standards" like the start window and the tool bar will harm sales, and the extra mousework will soon have people looking back at Win 7 with nostalgia.
I get the distinct feeling that Windows 8 will be the new Windows Vista, hogging processor time and memory and generally being a disappointment. I went from Win Xp to Win Vista and a month later went back to Xp. I suspect the same will happen with Win 8. Microsoft still thinks it can dictate the market, and that ended with the ascent of Linux. Microsoft needs to pay more attention to their customers and less attention to their designers. It's customers who drive the market, not the developers.
onejn
50%
50%
onejn,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/18/2012 | 7:05:27 PM
re: 10 Great Windows 8 Apps
I more than agree with RpDN. Windows 8 is a user interface nightmare to begin with, not just because of the start button and the nuisance of the forced start screen. It appears someone hates customers and decided to aggravate them in some form of sick revenge. Why did everything that used to be formatted to the left side get changed to the right and vise-versa? I would also add that despite the fact I have a brand new (3 day old) 3.4 Ghz, 8GB, 64 bit system, I think Windows 8 runs slower (my IP is GCI, commercial, so it's not the provider). It appears they don't have the smarts to avoid the old mistake of trying to fix or improve something that works perfectly. Or maybe it's just some new big wig that thinks he has to justify his job so he'll do anything, even if it's wrong.

NPCO
50%
50%
NPCO,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/18/2012 | 6:34:26 PM
re: 10 Great Windows 8 Apps
"...and avoiding the Desktop like the compromise solution that it is"

Perhaps I'm misunderstanding this, but since when did the Desktop all of the sudden become a "compromise solution"? There has been decades of UI development, experiment and refinement that has led to the current desktop metaphor as the optimal way to interact with a computer. Likewise, the mouse and keyboard have also proven to be optimal, efficient and relatively ergonomic input methods.

I'm afraid I simply don't understand this latest trend of forcing the UI conventions of a 4 inch screened telephone onto a full-on desktop computer. The smartphone UI truly is the compromise solution - touch input is extremely imprecise, imparts wear, tear and fingerprints on the same screen you have to view, and the 4 to 5 inch size necessitates apps running in full-screen only, as there simply isn't enough room to display anything more than a single, relatively simplistic app's UI at a time. THAT truly IS a compromise. It's one we accept for the convenience of a handheld device with so much utility and capabilities, but make no mistake, the smartphone UI is a compromise.

This is why I'm having trouble seeing the logic in forcing all the limitations of the smartphone UI on a full desktop computer, and not only disregarding all the resources the typical desktop system provides (ample screen space, ample memory and processor resources, precision pointing devices, etc), but in addition, going to far as to now claim that the traditional desktop is the compromise solution that the touch-UI solves.

I'm sorry, I have no desire to touch my desktop monitor. I don't want it covered in fingerprints, I don't want to reach across my desk to do so, and I need more precision than my finger can provide. And as with most people, my work requires a fair amount of multitasking, be it between several full desktop apps, or a single one and a combination of contact apps - e-mail, skype, etc. On a desktop, a touch-first, full screen only UI negatively and dramatically impairs productivity. Sure, there are a few specific use scenarios where it can be preferable (a specific, primarily single use system like a media PC attached to a television, for example), but for the general use desktop computer, it's just a very poor fit.

It's really concerning today when so many in general, and journalists especially, are so willing to jump on a bandwagon, buying into, endorsing and promoting an idea riddled with obvious contradictions, falsehoods and plain old failed logic. The smartphone UI is the compromise solution even when it's on a smartphone, and exponentially more so when it's slapped, without change, on a full desktop computer. That people not only blindly accept that compromise, not only endorse and promote the idea, but then claim the traditional desktop is actually the compromise is, quite frankly, frightening and bizarre.
Fjet
50%
50%
Fjet,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/18/2012 | 5:16:10 PM
re: 10 Great Windows 8 Apps
My Windows 7 computers were SLOW - only by upgrading to Windows 8 did they speed up! I like Windows 8...
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
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