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9/9/2013
02:22 PM
Kevin Casey
Kevin Casey
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Microsoft's Journey May Leave Too Many Behind

Microsoft's pending leadership change offers a chance to tweak its boom-or-bust "we're on a journey" message. Instead, it appears the company is simply turning up the volume.

When a company changes leadership at the top, it signals an opportunity for new ideas, fresh perspectives and, if necessary, a shift in future direction. It's also an opportunity to lay blame for past missteps at the feet of the predecessor.

Steve Ballmer's pending retirement should create such opportunities for Microsoft. While it would be wrongheaded to expect Microsoft's next CEO to throw out the company's entire playbook, the leadership change enables the company to gracefully tweak its ongoing "journey" message and corresponding product development to better reflect that, hey, maybe a finance pro toiling in Excel and a college student playing Xbox don't have the same needs.

That's ultimately one of the flaws in Microsoft's recent strategy, especially for Windows: an apparent insistence that users crave a uniform experience across devices, locations and functions. Ballmer said as much himself in his recent "One Microsoft" email to employees: "About a year ago, we embarked on a new strategy to realize our vision, opening the devices and services chapter for Microsoft," Ballmer wrote. "We made important strides -- launching Windows 8 and Surface, moving to continuous product cycles, bringing a consistent user interface to PCs, tablets, phones and Xbox -- but we have much more to do." (Note: emphasis mine.)

[ For more on Microsoft's strategy, see Microsoft's Big Risk As Ballmer Departs: Windows Phone. ]

There's plenty of upside for businesses in Microsoft's new direction, especially in rapid-release development cycles. But even if we set aside Xbox -- a conspicuously out-of-place device for most business users -- the notion that we all crave a single-user experience across PCs and mobile devices is misguided. It's also one of the key reasons that Windows 8 has caused so much consternation. More than a few InformationWeek readers have chimed in with similar sentiments via email or website comments.

"Elleno," for example, recently wrote: "I use my tablet for reading, surfing the Web, looking up info, running apps, but for proper work -- writing a letter to a client, analyzing a spreadsheet or dealing with email in business -- nothing beats a PC. [Businesses] are not swapping out PCs any time soon. And nor are consumers who do more than consume information." Reader "Palapatine" replied: "And that is why burying the desktop [behind the modern UI] and officially calling it legacy scared all users and developers with common sense."

With the dust still settling on Ballmer's announcement, though, Microsoft appears to be amplifying the one-size-fits-all message rather than revising it. The Nokia deal comes to mind, as does its ongoing Windows 8.x strategy. While Windows 8.1 includes some concessions to traditional PC users, it remains a touch-first OS that's better suited for tablets and hybrid devices. Smaller-scale decisions such as the shutdown of TechNet subscriptions for IT pros haven't helped dispel the notion that Microsoft is forsaking its historic dominance with business users -- many of whom will continue to use PCs for the long haul -- in its quest to compete with Apple and Google in the consumer mobility market.

This isn't to suggest that Microsoft should ignore consumers, per se. Its shareholders won't stand for that. As InformationWeek's Michael Endler recently noted, Microsoft might not be able to live on enterprise dollars alone. Isn't there a more prudent course, though, one that still embraces the "bold vision," "transformation" and "new chapter" sentiments prevalent in Microsoft's recent communications about Windows? Wouldn't Microsoft be better served by a bit of chest-thumping about its core expertise in business computing -- and how it will serve a new, different set of consumer computing experiences -- rather than talking up mobility and the blurring lines between work and home, like we're just now entering this brave new world? (It might be new to Microsoft, but the rest of us having been living in that world for a quite a while.)

Instead of insisting on the "unified experience" for businesses and consumers alike, regardless of their hardware or usage, why not declare, "We're going to have our cake and eat it, too." Or the long-winded version: "We know the difference between an architect who spends 10 hours a day in a CAD application on a desktop and a casual Web surfer with one eye on their smartphone and the other on their TV -- and we will deliver the best experiences to suit those different needs."

For now, though, Microsoft's playing the same unified-experience tune. There's a whole bunch of applicable clichés here: robbing Peter to pay Paul, cutting off your nose to spite your face, throwing out the baby with bathwater and so on. A leadership change should help Microsoft sidestep those clichés as the company charts its next 10 years and beyond. At the moment, though, the "journey" continues at full speed, and PC users in particular might get left behind.

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Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
9/10/2013 | 2:56:33 PM
re: Microsoft's Journey May Leave Too Many Behind
PC users who are not intrigued by touch represent an awfully large constituency. The 'unified experience' still doesn't appeal to these users. Is it time for MS to poke some more fun at itself? The 'PC guys' might like this approach much better than 'one journey.'
AdrianA931
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AdrianA931,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/10/2013 | 3:13:08 PM
re: Microsoft's Journey May Leave Too Many Behind
i really hope Microsoft can make windows 8 operating system more successful , in my opinion , win 8 system is quit good , it changes the operating habit ,but it's smart . windows phone has a big gap with iOS and Android .
mskeyoffer com
AustinIT
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AustinIT,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/10/2013 | 7:57:36 PM
re: Microsoft's Journey May Leave Too Many Behind
You naysayers STILL don't get it. Windows 8 is NOT about creating one UX across all usage scenarios. It's more about providing multiple UI's IN ONE BOX rather than having to have different devices for each. To me, that's so much more powerful in the end. If you are desktop guy, go with that. If you are a consumer, use the new Modern UI. The fact that you can switch depending on your need at the time is rather cool.
Shane M. O'Neill
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Shane M. O'Neill,
User Rank: Author
9/10/2013 | 11:11:51 PM
re: Microsoft's Journey May Leave Too Many Behind
Windows 8 was a good idea. Why not consolidate two UI types that people seem to like into one device? But the people didn't come. It proved that users want their tablet experience to be its own entity and not be stapled to a desktop UI, and vice versa. There's a pretty bad stigma now when you hear the words "Windows" and "Mobile" in the same sentence, justified or not. MS gave Apple, Google and Amazon too much time to define what a tablet should be and a unified Windows experience across devices doesn't make sense to people. If it did, Surface tablets and Windows Phones would be selling. Continuing to chase Apple and Google in mobile is a fool's errand and hopefully Ballmer's replacement will realize that and act accordingly.
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
9/11/2013 | 1:46:29 AM
re: Microsoft's Journey May Leave Too Many Behind
Apple got it right by keeping its touch-based (iOS) and mouse-based (OS X) operating systems separate.
cbabcock
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cbabcock,
User Rank: Strategist
9/11/2013 | 2:33:27 AM
re: Microsoft's Journey May Leave Too Many Behind
I don't think it's just the naysayers who don't get it. Windows 8 is a good operating system but there was too much Apple envy encapsulated in it. Apple has a cool touch user interface -- hey, we can do that too. Apple innovation came with insight into what consumers would want and use in the smart phone and tablet formats. It took the risk and reaped the reward. Imposing a touch screen experience on the PC user shows a lack of consumer insight. If you're going to copy Apple, then copy the part that restricted the touch interface to smaller, personal devices. Make it an option, not the default, on the PC.
virsingh211
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virsingh211,
User Rank: Strategist
9/11/2013 | 10:56:31 AM
re: Microsoft's Journey May Leave Too Many Behind
windows 7 had pure user friendly costumed look and appearance which was getting faded some wherein front of sophisticated and cosmetic look of ios..i guess MS overlapped this in win8 and gave altogether fresh and appealing look. Apart from this iOS does include a search function, but it parses a drastically limited set of values, rather windows comes out with complete search results.win 8 appGÇÖs settings and options are built directly into the app itself.
britnat
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britnat,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/11/2013 | 11:05:48 AM
re: Microsoft's Journey May Leave Too Many Behind
Good reporting, Kevin. Hits the nails on their heads. In a way, Microsoft's present attitude reminds me of that shown by the IBM chief priests - back in the day when Microsoft was still a twinkle in Bill's eye. IBM - huge corporation - virtual monopoly (they thought) - and within a few years they were shedding hundreds of thousands of employees - and were never quite the same again. Sure - they didn't do bust - but they must be kicking themselves over giving Bill Gates the niche they could have had all to themselves.

In this case - Microsoft have a significant niche - and are driving their loyal customers away. Everywhere we go - die hard Microsoft customers are talking Linux. Or Mac. These are not IT specialists - just business people, who till now were absolutely reluctant to even think of abandoning Windows. Now - they're not only thinking it - it's happening. We reckon it will spread, and once something gains momentum - it will be very difficult (impossible?) to stop.

One of my inside sources uses the word "evangelists" about the guys at Microsoft who are pushing the "unified experience". Yup - it almost has religious overtones. They have sold themselves on a concept - the only way to digital heaven is their way - and only hear what they want to hear. What other people call tunnel vision.
TDERENTHAL8066
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TDERENTHAL8066,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/11/2013 | 12:42:14 PM
re: Microsoft's Journey May Leave Too Many Behind
Can we all quit crying about Win 8.x on the desktop, already? I use VS2012, Office 2013, Office 365, every brand of browser, manage servers at data centers in 3 different states, and, get ready for it... my Win 8.1 machine boots directly to the desktop, and looks, feels and works like my desktop from Win 8 which evolved from my Win 7 desktop, which evolved slightly from my old XP, which was begat by Win 98, which was begat by Win 95, whose father was Win 3.x.
Your IT will build an image for your desktop machines that will more or less duplicate your old desktop. Deal!
Also, can we quit with the prognostications about the death/near-death of MS.
Now, get back to work!
Bob124
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Bob124,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/11/2013 | 1:11:53 PM
re: Microsoft's Journey May Leave Too Many Behind
Microsoft employee? Microsoft Stack?
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