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5/8/2013
07:19 PM
Mike Feibus
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Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?

Microsoft's Windows 8 update, Windows Blue, must give PC users a more familiar way to work. Microsoft used to manage transitions better -- instead of opening the door for its rivals.

8 Things Microsoft Could Do To Save Windows 8
8 Things Microsoft Could Do To Save Windows 8
(click image for slideshow)
For more than a month now, the unrelenting flood of news, gossip and opinion surrounding Windows 8 has been focused on Windows Blue, the code name for the upcoming Windows 8 refresh, and what it can do to repair the ailing PC platform.

This week, finally, Microsoft formally acknowledged Windows Blue and confirmed that the Windows 8 follow-on, which comes closer to a service release than an all-new Windows version, will make its way to the market by year's end.

Bloggers already have spent weeks combing through the various leaked builds of the upcoming refresh and exposing new features, performance enhancements and UI improvements. Company representatives haven't yet confirmed any of those discoveries, saying only that Microsoft has been listening closely to customer feedback and will be giving a full-on demonstration at Microsoft's Build 2013 developer conference at the end of June.

[ What else can Microsoft do to mollify Windows users? Windows Blue: Restoring The Start Button Isn't Enough. ]

The tech press has been fixated on discerning just how closely Microsoft has been listening. Indeed, it has written so much lately with so little to go on from Microsoft that the coverage has taken on the tenor of an Access Hollywood report before a Kardashian wedding.

I'm making light, but in many ways the onslaught of articles is justifiable. Certainly, it underscores just how much is riding on Windows Blue. With all the hype and glitz surrounding smartphones and tablets, it's easy to lose sight of how critical a role the PC still plays in many of our lives. No, it's not the same role it played last year, or the year before. But for many of us -- certainly for most of us in IT -- a Windows PC is still a go-to device in our quiver of electronics tools. And because of the pace of change in the enterprise segment, Windows is guaranteed to play a central role for several more years at least.

In that sense, Microsoft isn't just gambling its own fortunes. It's messing with how many of us get things done every day.

That's why the anger over Windows 8 has been so palpable, and why fixing it has become so important. Forcing us to take longer, more circuitous routes to what we do every day feels like starting breakfast one morning only to find that your roommate has rearranged the kitchen. The more often you reach for a fork in what's become the towel drawer, the angrier you get.

If Microsoft is really listening to customers, then Windows Blue will give users a way to do things the way they're used to. Microsoft understood that wisdom back in the early days of Windows, when it used a two-step process to woo Lotus users over to Excel. For years, Microsoft gave diehard Lotus fans their old menus and keystroke combos. So those users came over to Excel. And eventually, those users got to know Excel and they dropped their demands for Lotus commands.

In the same way, Microsoft needs to let customers do things the way they've always done them if it's ever going to engineer a successful migration to its Modern UI. Apparently, though, that institutional knowledge has been lost at Microsoft. When the incumbent forces customers to change in ways they don't want to, as Microsoft has been doing, it opens the doors to competition. Of course, the Mac is always welcoming frustrated Windows users. Some Linux bundlers, successful in the server space, increasingly are setting their sights on the PC client. And now Google is readying an assault on Windows' turf with a new generation of Chromebooks due out in the second half of the year.

A larger desktop tile on the Start screen, as Windows Blue reportedly has, won't placate long-time Windows users. Microsoft will have to give folks who have no use for tiles a way to work the way they do now. If Microsoft doesn't do this, users will keep seeing red -- until, eventually, this issue won't be important to them any more.

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Somedude8
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Somedude8,
User Rank: Ninja
5/9/2013 | 5:02:25 PM
re: Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?
I have no issues with Windows 8, and don't know anyone who falls in to the "anger over Windows 8" category. The only people I hear from that seem really bent out of shape over Windows 8 are the tech columnists!
I am not saying that Windows 8 is without issues; I believe some concern is warranted. BUt I also think that the tech writer community has gone overboard here, hyping the problems much like, well, Access Hollywood before a Kardashian wedding.
I have read and enjoyed other articles by the author, some really good stuff. I am not blaming him for Win8 hate hype, but would like to see a bit less of the articles with names like "What can MS do to save Windows?" and similar.
AustinIT
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AustinIT,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/9/2013 | 5:28:13 PM
re: Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?
I completely agree with you. It is largely the tech press and fanboys of other platforms that are beating down on Microsoft over Win8. This creates an even bigger problem because of all the intellectualy lazy people who parrot the "bad news" as if they were some sort of expert on the subject.

Win8 is better than Win7. It's a new product that introduces the new Modern UI while keeping the legacy support in place. Yes, it's a bit different but is easy to learn and you quickly get used to the changes. For those who just can't sleep at night, 8.1 should make those crybabies happier.

Microsoft has always walked on a double edged sword... if they don't innovate they get slammed. If they change anything significant, they get slammed. If they drop legacy support, they get slammed. Personnaly, I think they have maintained the best of both worlds for quite some time.
GChiasson
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GChiasson,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/9/2013 | 5:42:58 PM
re: Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?
Agreed, a few months ago we installed two Windows 8 desktops used by order entry and a documentation person. No touch monitors. Not one complaint, and I make a point of asking the users when I'm in. I'm not sure they even know about the start screen. Yes I pinned Outlook, Word and Excel to the task bar but I did this for Windows 7 users too because most clerical users didn't know how to do this in Windows 7 either.
sanderson94518
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sanderson94518,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/9/2013 | 5:48:16 PM
re: Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?
My configuration is two high res displays. Windows 8
is useless on a dual monitor setup. The Metro, Modern, name de jour
tablet interface does NOT support two displays. The user is first presented
with the Tiled interface on the primary display and the classic desktop on the
second display. In addition, the navigation becomes near impossible when
trying to hover over any of the four corners or side bar when there are two
displays as the hot spots are too hard to hit. The mouse just moves between
the primary and the secondary unless you have the dexterity to accurately
position the mouse. Don't force a tablet interface to users who are
accustom to dual displays. Just give us
the simple option to boot directly into Classic mode and leave the tablet/touch
interface for touch based laptops, convertibles, and tablets.
Terabyte Net
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Terabyte Net,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/21/2013 | 6:41:28 PM
re: Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?
Install Classic Shell and you problems are over. It's 5 minute download/install and you have your classic desktop back along with the speed, security, and stability of Windows 8. Best of both worlds.
MyW0r1d
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MyW0r1d,
User Rank: Strategist
5/9/2013 | 6:26:00 PM
re: Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?
Take away the possibility to use sensationalist speech from the journalists and bloggers and who would read their stuff. Got to play the game, drive interest to sell your product.
CopyingAppleIsDangerous
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CopyingAppleIsDangerous,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/10/2013 | 4:36:24 PM
re: Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?
What a crock. You can get on the phone right now and call Dell and ask them how their customers feel about Windows 8. Everyone knows that the hate for Windows 8 has been PROFOUND. It's all over the Internet.

Shill.
Faye Kane, homeless brain
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Faye Kane, homeless brain,
User Rank: Strategist
5/13/2013 | 2:37:08 AM
re: Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?
==--
Aww, calm down! Those guys are PAID to tell everyone how great 8 is and that nobody complains about it. They're lying, marketing lowlifes in either Redmond or India.

Genuine positive comments about 8 will NEVER praise Microsoft for its "brilliant, amazing, forward-looking innovation of the future!" Real comments will just say "8 is okay" or "8 works for what I need to do", etc. And whenever you read someone insult people who don't like 8, that's a smoking gun. I;m talking about "you're afraid of change", "cling to the past", "fear of anything new", "you're an unprofessional and irresponsible IT manager", etc.

Note how few of those genuine positive comments there are. Virtually all the positive comments about 8 are paid for by unethical, ugly Microsoft.

-faye kane
Sexiest astrophysicist you'll ever see naked
Terabyte Net
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Terabyte Net,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/21/2013 | 6:42:32 PM
re: Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?
Couldn't disagree more. As a consultant in the Dell Consultant Network I've not heard what you're claiming either from customers or from my reps at Dell.
CopyingAppleIsDangerous
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CopyingAppleIsDangerous,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/22/2013 | 2:58:01 AM
re: Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?
Please. I live in Texas. That means that, by law, I have the right to record any conversation that I have, with anyone in the world, at any time, for no reason, without notice, as long as one of my feet is on Texas soil.

I am inclined to call Dell, have the salesman/saleswoman admit to me what they at first admitted circuitously, and now admit without hesitation or provocation, and post that junk up on YouTube so the whole world can hear the truth about what Dell thinks of Microsoft's Windows 8 stunt.

Let me ask you this: True or False:

Dell had several meetings with Microsoft after the beginning of this year basically gently-but-firmly stating to Microsoft that Dell will continue to sell Windows 7 machines whether Microsoft liked it or not.

True or False?
Ramon S
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Ramon S,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/11/2013 | 12:48:27 PM
re: Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?
I disagree, I use Win8 on a regular basis alongside Win7 and XP. Win8 just stinks, Win7 is usable, and ironically XP has the best performance of them all. The dislike of Win8 is there in the real world, not just in blogs and articles. Win8 is just craptastic.
Terabyte Net
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Terabyte Net,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/21/2013 | 6:43:24 PM
re: Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?
I'm not sure what hardware you're running these OSs on, but every test I've seen and done says Win8 x64 is much faster than XP and marginally faster than Win7 x64.
DDURBIN1
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DDURBIN1,
User Rank: Ninja
5/9/2013 | 5:22:49 PM
re: Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?
When Vista arrived there were 8 or 9 versions. The top version, Ultimate, was over $600 while the bottom version was $250. Too many versions, too expensive, and no backward compatibility. Win7 fixed all these. Now Win8 has only one version. Maybe its time to have a desktop version and another for touch devices.
Terabyte Net
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Terabyte Net,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/21/2013 | 6:47:48 PM
re: Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?
You're comparing apples to oranges. Vista was Home Basic, Home Premium, Business, Ultimate, Enterprise. Certainly not 9 versions. Win8 has 3 "real" versions, Windows 8, Windows 8 Pro, Windows 8 Enterprise, and Windows 8 RT (essentially an embedded runtime version without a lot of options). Win7 also had 4 versions (though no RT). If you don't like or have the touch screen option install Classic Shell and you then have the version for non-touch devices. Reducing the # of builds Vista had was a smart move as it reduces the amount of testing that has to be done for compatibility for patches, programs, drivers, etc...
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
5/9/2013 | 5:31:19 PM
re: Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?
"The more often you reach for a fork in what's become the towel drawer, the angrier you get." That is a classic analogy, Mike. And I am sure many readers can relate to it.

Laurianne McLaughlin
InformationWeek
Doug in Skagit County
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Doug in Skagit County,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/11/2013 | 1:16:14 AM
re: Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?
The example used by the author uses an image so simple yet accurate that, hopefully, the thoughts are read and comprehended by someone very important at Microsoft. Nicely put!

For a business employing many highly-paid workers (E. g., engineers), very quickly it gets very expensive when said employees reach into the wrong drawer for the tool that they have always stored in that drawer, and now have to open every door in the kitchen, and perhaps drawers in the garage and the shed out back, never knowing where Microsoft has stored those tools, or of they have shrouded the tools behind curtains, and applied misleading labels on the curtains.

For a business to justify a change, that change must improve efficiency of each end every employee, not slow those employees, which makes the new OS very expensive to operate, on a dollars-per-hour basis.
mbrunetti460
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mbrunetti460,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/9/2013 | 5:34:28 PM
re: Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?
I run the Mac OS on my PC. I've been doing it for several years. As a developer, I'd rather deal with a Unix foundation and be able to use a native Unix shell, but I don't like the available Linux UI's. Just search the web for "Hackintosh" and you find what you need. I use Tonymac's stuff. To run Windows programs, use Parallels or Fusion. So I'm using a PC, running Mac OSX Mountain Lion (10.8.3) and virtualizing a PC! It's a wonderful world.
AustinAnalyst
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AustinAnalyst,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/9/2013 | 6:20:09 PM
re: Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?
Cool. Is there anybody that builds these for others ?
Terabyte Net
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Terabyte Net,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/21/2013 | 6:49:17 PM
re: Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?
Might be a wonderful world, but have you read the Apple EULA? You're likely breaking the law. Gotta love Apple and their draconian EULAs.
bwalker970
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bwalker970,
User Rank: Strategist
5/9/2013 | 5:36:36 PM
re: Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?
Microsoft has not managed transitions well in the past so why should this time be even better? Microsoft has a poor record of transitioning their portfolio. They simply do not know how to evolve a products. Rather, they aspire to revolution. Just looking at Windows releases, we can recall the controversies that surrounded Windows 95, Windows XP, Windows Vista and Windows 7. There are people still using Windows XP who refuse to migrate to any of the more recent releases. The leading emphasis for all product releases is new features and that often means forcing the user to do things differently, but not necessarily better. If Microsoft were to focus first on user experience, we would not be having this conversation.
AustinAnalyst
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AustinAnalyst,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/9/2013 | 5:40:20 PM
re: Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?
"Microsoft used to manage transitions better"
eg. Windows ME, Windows Vista, Windows 8 ?

What is to become of Windows 7 which is a stable, secure OS ? My problem with Microsoft I also have with Apple. When the new OS is released, the "old" version becomes difficult to find or costs more to "downgrade" on new computers. Apple is especially problematic because of processor requirements for "new" OS's. Then again, Apple is a hardware vendor too. Is that the direction Microsoft is going ?
AustinIT
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AustinIT,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/9/2013 | 7:02:47 PM
re: Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?
You can still buy Win7. Heck, you can still get WinXP if you want it.

Microsoft has always been very conscious of backward compatibility. Both hardware and software. They have to because of the huge investment made by businesses in the ecosystem. Speaking of ecosystems, Microsoft is playing in a wide open field (as opposed to Apple) that allows many companies to develop and compete. It's one of those situations that is good new bad news. The good news is that it fosters innovation via third parties. The bad news is that MS usually gets the blame when some third parties develop crappy products. This open ecosystem is also an albatrose that slows down the pace of innovation on the OS platform - which is why we have seen such long runs between new OS releases. This is finally beginning to change with Win8.

Finally, all of their OS's support the x86 and x64 chipsets. And, now, the ARM chipset with Win8RT. So, no, Microsoft is not becoming Apple in that respect.
sbacerra456
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sbacerra456,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/9/2013 | 6:23:42 PM
re: Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?
There may be those who don't like Windows 8, but I am not one of them. MY hope is that Microsoft doesn't change too much of Windows 8 in Windows Blue. I do think, however, that, for traditionalists, it would be helpful for them to do one major thing: place a start button on the Desktop. It's not necessary on Metro. Yeah, there are still a few other tweaks that I would like to see (such as using the snipping tool in Metro), but they are relatively minor in the grand scheme of things. Maybe Microsoft should support Windows 7 AND 8 (and the upcoming "Blue"), so that people can choose and use the OS that works best for them. By the way... My laptop is not a touch screen, but I can do all the same gestures on my enlarged touchpad, and I LOVE that! Who wants sore arms reaching out to touch their laptop screen all day, anyway?
AustinIT
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AustinIT,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/9/2013 | 7:05:44 PM
re: Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?
The Start button and menu are making a return in Blue. That along with the ability to boot / login straight to the traditional desktop (which btw is Win7 improved). This info has already been confirmed.
ANON1242271438356
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ANON1242271438356,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/9/2013 | 6:40:24 PM
re: Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?
Win 8 appears to have been made for the masses that consume data. It works for that. But what about those of us who create content? It just isn't efficient. Another person commented on problems using multiple monitors - that's a problem! Win 8 is a great OS - underneath the UI - so simply create 2 UI's - one for touch devices and one for mouse/keyboard input. Yes, it will reduce some traffic to the online store, but leaving it like it is now will reduce bottom line profits for MS much more.
jries921
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jries921,
User Rank: Ninja
5/9/2013 | 6:43:56 PM
re: Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?
We do appear to have some serious denial here (as with Vista). It's clear that there are lots of Windows users that are unhappy with what MS has put out, and MS has to listen to them if it wants to keep them. There are viable alternatives to Windows that lots of people know about and like (unlike in the 1990s), so it behooves MS to act accordingly.

MS probably doesn't need to listen to "ABMers" like me, but they really should listen to their users.
Terabyte Net
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Terabyte Net,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/21/2013 | 7:01:07 PM
re: Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?
There are no viable business alternatives to Windows. 95% or more of business software is written for the PC. You cannot run a business on an iPad, it's really an expensive toy with a 40 year old GUI. Most point of sale products are written for PC. Yes there are some business apps for Apple and Linux, but they're generally much less mature with far fewer features.
stoenniessen025
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stoenniessen025,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/9/2013 | 7:14:56 PM
re: Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?
Half of corporate users are still migrating to Windows 7 - and what do they see when they click to add a desktop gadget from the internet? A message from Microsoft declaring gadgets discontinued. Imagine how frustrating that is to people.
They need to: A) let Windows be configured to run in full blown desktop mode by booting into it and having the start menu back; B) bring back support for sidebar gadgets - AT LEAST put the links back on their web site to the legacy stuff if they don't want to develop new ones although they should at least continue to support the Office/Lync/Outlook related gadgets; C) give us Aero mode back. Aero mode hasn't been around long enough for it to go out of style - the new flat look is too much like XP which is what most people are coming from.
That said, I think they got it right with the Modern UI for use on phones, tablets and touch screens. The keyboard/mouse is still a productive way to work, though, and, in many situation superior to touch. It needs to be accomodated better than in Win8.
AustinIT
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AustinIT,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/9/2013 | 9:00:14 PM
re: Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?
Oh well, things change... constantly. And, it's not just Microsoft. Ask any Google user how frustrated they are to see Google pull the plug on services that they have relied on for a long time.
The problem with gadgets (and plugins, addons, etc.) are that they have become a conduit for malware to penetrate and infect a PC. You can thank the criminal element for ruining things for the rest of us. So now, Microsoft is controlling app delivery (Modern apps) via their App Store, much like Apple is doing whereby they can vette software that is being installed on the Modern UI.
CopyingAppleIsDangerous
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CopyingAppleIsDangerous,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/10/2013 | 4:33:33 PM
re: Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?
You seem to forget that the whole reason many of has been loyal to Microsoft is because we do not want a company, that SELLS us something, to keep their greedy paw extending, trying to milk us for more $$$ AFTER we have already bought their OS.

But don't worry. If Microsoft doesn't fix the abomination that is Windows 8, it will learn how stupid this stunt is.
bperrin34601
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bperrin34601,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/9/2013 | 8:19:38 PM
re: Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?
It is refreshing to see some of the people who actually use Windows 8 responding to the ongoing diatribe about how terrible Windows 8 is and how Microsoft missed the boat. I have used, in a production environment, Windows 8 since it was first released to the developer community. The early days were challenging and the "Metro" interface was fraught with hiccups, but, the full release last November has been a joy to work with. I find my productivity has risen two to three fold. Incidentally, I do not have a touch screen and I use the Start Screen all the time. I often wonder why people complain about the lack of a Start Button. There it is in two locations on the keyboard. The number of other shortcuts that Microsoft has provided us with is significant and, although I do not use them all, the ones I use regularly have made my life a whole lot easier.Thank you sbacerra456, AustinIT and Somedude8 for a little balance.
DDURBIN1
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DDURBIN1,
User Rank: Ninja
5/10/2013 | 6:50:33 PM
re: Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?
I'm glad you put in the work and effort to get to use Win8 but you shouldn't have too. The writer's analogy to the kitchen being re-arranged is spot on. A whole lot of arbitrary changes from Win7 that didn't need changing.
Terabyte Net
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Terabyte Net,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/21/2013 | 7:03:39 PM
re: Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?
So when the microwave was introduced to the masses in the 80's we should have all ignored them? I guess electric stoves in the kitchen or dishwashers should all go too? Come on, sometimes you have to remodel the kitchen to make it more functional. The kitchen analogy is tired and illogical. Or perhaps you all still cook over an open fire pit, not even on a wood stove.
Faye Kane, homeless brain
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Faye Kane, homeless brain,
User Rank: Strategist
5/17/2013 | 6:21:02 AM
re: Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?
==--
" I find my productivity has risen two to three fold."

Even when Microsoft's marketing shills try to tone down their obviously fake posts, you can still always tell it's them. They don't just say "8 works great for me"; they always have to tell how Wonderful! and Exciting! and Magical! it is.

The only thing THAT wonderful and exciting and magical is sex.

--faye kane GÖÇ girl brain
http://tinyurl.com/kanescave
DAVIDINIL
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DAVIDINIL,
User Rank: Strategist
5/9/2013 | 8:21:07 PM
re: Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?
I have tons of issues w/ Win 8. I had to do a youtube search and watch a video just to figure out how to launch wordpad. I will be typing in wordpad and the weather page suddenly appears. I'm sorry did I click on some weather button? No I did not.
I tried to put a new user account on my sons machine. I go thru all the screens (it wants my name, address, email, phone #). I hit enter and find out that the machine couldn't communicate w/ a server in Redmond. So I could not establish a user account on my own machine. Nice.
I am not a luddite. I loved Win 7 from the get go. Win 8 is simply unusable for the reasons I posted and many others that wouldn't fit in this comment box.
AustinIT
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AustinIT,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/9/2013 | 9:28:03 PM
re: Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?
The new Modern UI makes it simple to find things by using the Search feature. All you have to do is start typing. For instance, I can find Wordpad by simply typing in the first three characters of the name Wor and up pops a list of apps that are installed. In my case, Word 2013 and Wordpad both come up. By clicking on Wordpad, the UI switches to Desktop (legacy) mode and the WordPad app starts.
The fact that you can get to any of your old favorite apps and utilities via Search is why Microsoft canned the Start button in the first place. The Modern UI is just an entry point that supports all the legacy stuff and the new Modern apps and utilities.
If you want to create a new user account, there are a number of different ways to do it but an easy way is to simply start typing User and the Search screen appears. On the right side, click Settings to change the Search category (from the default of Apps) and the User Accounts link/icon will appear in the second column of search results. From here, you can create a "traditional" local user account. Or, you can create a Microsoft Account which doubles as a logon account for your PC as well as an online account that gives you access to all of Microsoft's online services (all with a single sign-on to your PC). To do this, click the "Manage Another Account" link. On the Manage Accounts screen that appears, click the "Add a New User in PC Settings" link.On the PC Settings page, click the "Add a User" link on the bottom right. The default is to add a new user by creating a Microsoft Account for them. If you want to simply create a "local" account (not an online account) then click the "Sign in without a Microsoft Account" link. Then click "Local Account". Fill in the name and password and you are done.
Try using the Search feature in the Modern UI. You will see how easy it is to find everything you were used to before but in a more intuitive way. Control Panel, Devices and Printers, etc.
one more tip - press the Windows flag key to toggle between the Modern and Desktop UIs.
CopyingAppleIsDangerous
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CopyingAppleIsDangerous,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/10/2013 | 4:31:12 PM
re: Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?
I read about 40% of your reply until I thought, "This is friggin' ridiculous. I am an engineer, not some idiot who doesn't know how to use computers."

Windows 8 sucks.
AustinIT
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AustinIT,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/10/2013 | 6:23:23 PM
re: Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?
My reply was not addressed to you. Ignore it if it doesn't apply to you. Your ranting doesn't elevate your cred as "an engineer".
Faye Kane, homeless brain
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Faye Kane, homeless brain,
User Rank: Strategist
5/17/2013 | 6:44:48 AM
re: Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?
==--
" Ignore it if it doesn't apply to you."

It doesn't apply to ANYBODY because it's B.S. That's the whole point, see?

The community has spoken: 8 sux dix. We told you that during the preview, but you didn't care. Now the chickens have come home to roost.

Deal with it, because denying it makes you look either ridiculous or stupid.
Faye Kane, homeless brain
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Faye Kane, homeless brain,
User Rank: Strategist
5/17/2013 | 6:37:19 AM
re: Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?
==--
"The fact that you can get to any of your old favorite apps and utilities via Search..."

But you shouldn't HAVE to, shill! Two clicks on the start menu structure is far, far easier. I don't want to have to remember the names of all my utilities; forget it!

"...is why Microsoft canned the Start button in the first place."

No it's not. It's because your boss, Ballmer, decided to force us to use a smartphone touch interface on our desktops because he thinks we will want the same interface when we buy a telephone or a tablet.

He thinks he can get away with it! In some meeting he said "The HELL with what the users want! They *have* to use Windows, so we can do what's good for our company instead of what's good for our customers".

He thinks there's a difference, see?

It's called corporate arrogance, and it's killed outfits bigger than Microsoft (like IBM with their microchannel bus).

Metro is his latest mistake in a stream of them he's made ever since he took over. Ballmer is a mismanagement mistake engine.

_______

I'm sure glad I don't have to do YOUR job! Telling lies would be hard for me, but in order to tell obvious, ridiculous ones about how swell Windows 8 is would require me to drink on the job.

Some of you shill commenters appear to do that.

--faye kane GÖÇ girl brain
dnationsr
50%
50%
dnationsr,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/9/2013 | 11:38:29 PM
re: Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?
I have a program that returns windows 8 to windows 7 and disables the metro..you will never see it again. anyone interested E-mail me @ dnationsr@gmail.com
Terabyte Net
50%
50%
Terabyte Net,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/21/2013 | 7:05:51 PM
re: Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?
It's called Classic Shell. NO need to e-mail him.
Palpatine
50%
50%
Palpatine,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/10/2013 | 6:46:51 AM
re: Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?
There are billions of desktop machines.
There are billions of desktop users.
There are billions of dollars in multi year plans on desktop machines hardware, software, maintenance, services.
There are billions of dollars invested in desktop environments productivity, development, content creation skills.

There are, you know, billions of DESKS where ultramobile users may place desktops to live a different computing experiences for some hours/day.
You, insane clown Ballmer, OWN 95% of that market: stop insulting billions of us, stop threatening our bucks, stop saying desktop is dead legacy, start working to provide us a product which is make us love and keep alive your company.
Doug in Skagit County
50%
50%
Doug in Skagit County,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/11/2013 | 1:24:52 AM
re: Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?
Very well put, thank you!
Faye Kane, homeless brain
50%
50%
Faye Kane, homeless brain,
User Rank: Strategist
5/17/2013 | 6:46:52 AM
re: Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?
==--
Hey, right on!
Anonomouser
50%
50%
Anonomouser,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/11/2013 | 4:12:06 AM
re: Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?
Windows hit an optimization high point at XP. So when the M$oft designers started changing things just for the sake of change it had nowhere to go but downhill. So that's how we got Vista, Win7, and Win8 with all their usability issues. On the upside, it forced M$oft to keep XP alive for well over a decade since they couldn't produce a better alternative. We used XP as the foundation for a medical product and have been lucky because it was stable and available for so long. But M$oft won't let that happen again. They want to update Windows a minimum of once per year, and are headed towards a subscription model for all their products including, I assume, the Windows OS. That's the main reason we are done with Windows and are moving to Linux, and leaving behind the usability issues the new Windows software just makes that much easier to justify.
Terabyte Net
50%
50%
Terabyte Net,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/21/2013 | 7:07:32 PM
re: Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?
So when you go to Linux and the first time something breaks who are you going to call? Also, talk about usability issues. There are tons of builds of Linux out there and most are not compatible with other builds so you're forced to buy software for your particular build of Linux. Enjoy that.
graxspoo
50%
50%
graxspoo,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/11/2013 | 4:14:05 AM
re: Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?
Windows 8 suffers from the same hubris that the Lion and Mountain Lion versions of OS X suffer from. They feature changes that reflect the strategic needs of the company, rather than the needs of users. No end-users to my knowledge have been asking for a desktop OS that works more like a smartphone. Apple at least had the taste to do it with some subtlety that can be mostly ignored. Microsoft could fix this issue without a complete backtrack fairly easily: make the PC boot straight into the desktop, and replace the old start menu with a miniature version of the "UI previously known as metro" in a largish bubble window. Imagine Apple's "Launch Pad" feature, but with the old start-menu's features added.
Chronicle
50%
50%
Chronicle,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/11/2013 | 9:45:14 AM
re: Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?
About the time Windows 8 was released, I saw a joke cartoon showing a side-by-side comparison between the Metro interface and the GUI present on AOL - as it was in 1996. It was uncanny how the two images looked alike. And underneath the cartoon was the comment, "Those who do not learn from history are doomed to repeat it."

I've been using a Windows 7 Home Premium system for about a year now. And the more I use it, the more I miss Windows XP Pro SP3.
JBURT000
50%
50%
JBURT000,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/11/2013 | 4:43:43 PM
re: Windows 8 Users See Red: Is Microsoft Listening?
Efforts to revive the PC market are ongoing. Here is the video--

https://www.youtube.com/watch?...
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