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10/3/2012
04:45 PM
Kevin Casey
Kevin Casey
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Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade

Somehow I've managed to not crumble under the albatross that is a near-five-pound laptop. I'm sticking with Windows 7--and many small businesses will, too.

8 Key Differences Between Windows 8 And Windows RT
8 Key Differences Between Windows 8 And Windows RT
(click image for larger view and for slideshow)
I recently upgraded my primary work PC. I thought about waiting a few months for Windows 8 and then thought: What am I waiting for?

I couldn't come up with many good answers. So I purchased a new laptop running Windows 7, and have no plans to upgrade later this month when Windows 8 launches. That's not necessarily staggering news, but here's why I keep thinking about it: I've always been a Windows guy. Shouldn't I be a little more eager for Microsoft's reboot of its longstanding OS?

The reality is that Windows 8 is a much bigger deal for Microsoft than it is for me and, I'd wager, most small businesses.

"An SMB is unlikely to decide 'Windows 7 is no longer good enough, I must have Windows 8!'," Analysys Mason analyst Patrick Rusby told me via email. "Windows 7 is proven and popular."

Exactly. Windows 7 works, quite well in my experience. So I don't see a particularly pressing need to upgrade; Microsoft will support Windows 7 through 2020. Although it's not new in technology time, it's new enough for me. I'm not an early adopter--I'm just a plain old adopter, which I think usually leads to better purchasing decisions on a small business budget.

"If it ain't broke, don't fix it," said Steve Hilton, Rusby's colleague at Analysys Mason. "Sometimes good enough is simply good enough for the majority of SMBs."

In a similar vein, I need the return on my technology investments to be clear cut. Like most small businesses and self-employed professionals, I'm willing to take significant risks knowing that they come with an increased likelihood of failure along the way--provided there's a tangible reward for success. A computer OS isn't an area where I see much upside in living dangerously. It just needs to get the job done well--or, more to the point, help me get my job done well. Windows 8, because it's a major revamp, comes with risks.

[ They're here, but does anyone care? See Nokia Windows Phone 8 Devices Arrive With Thud. ]

"Busy people do not want to have to learn a whole new OS, and Windows 8 looks sufficiently different as to require quite a bit of getting used to," Rusby said. He noted, too, that the new OS is a lot more consumer-y than previous versions, which have been mainstays on countless business machines. "It looks fun, not productive," Rusby said.

XBox is fun. Fantasy football is fun. The PCs in my office? Not so much fun, because that's not what they're there for.

Here's probably the biggest reason I'll be passing on Windows 8 for the foreseeable future: It wasn't designed for my needs. The two things I do most often in my job are typing and talking on the phone. A tablet is not optimal for either. Touch PCs sound nice in theory, and I can envision some jobs where they might make a good investment--just not mine, at least not now. But what about mobility? Somehow I've managed to not crumble under the albatross that is this near-five-pound laptop. My Android phone keeps me connected to email, voice, and other business apps when the laptop is offline.

"Windows 8 is really designed for touchscreens, so a new device is needed to get the best out of it," Rusby said. "That is another expense, and touchscreens still have to prove themselves a lot before they can replace laptops."

Even though Microsoft has been rolling out aggressive upgrade offers for Windows 8, I just don't see much rush. I'd like to see it in the wild. The consumer and release previews were just that: previews. I'd like to talk to other professionals about how they're using it to get work done, and how it compares with previous versions. Most of all, I'd like to see some clearer reasons for making the switch.

The OS upgrade treadmill, as InformationWeek.com's Jonathan Feldman called it, isn't for me. If and when I do get Windows 8, it will probably be driven by a hardware purchase, not the other way around. By then, we'll probably be talking about Windows 9.

There are no doubt other lines of work where Windows 8 might hold more immediate appeal. I'd love to hear from small and mid-size businesses that have plans for Windows 8. I'd like to hear from SMBs that, like me, are sticking with older versions of Windows for the foreseeable future. And if you just want to explain to me why I'm wrong, that's fine, too. You can reach me via email or Twitter, or chime in with a comment below.

Upgrading isn't the easy decision that Win 7 was. We take a close look at Server 2012, changes to mobility and security, and more in the new Here Comes Windows 8 issue of InformationWeek. Also in this issue: Why you should have the difficult conversations about the value of OS and PC upgrades before discussing Windows 8. (Free registration required.)

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Mike_Acker
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Mike_Acker,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/5/2012 | 2:04:23 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
IMHO, we have come to a Fork in the Road... Gaming and Entertainment ? MSFT/AAPL. But if you are interested in serious computing it might be time to load up a LINUX system and evaluate it.

yep, -- you'll have to swap a few programs you are used to to alternates which do the same chores.

But the question will be: what is important to you? If security comes to mind you might want to hunt up a computer you're not using an try a copy of UBUNTU. Get the 12.04 LTS -- either 32 or 64 bit.
melgross
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melgross,
User Rank: Ninja
10/6/2012 | 4:13:35 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
Will you guys stop with the Linux madness already? That train has left the station, and isn't coming back. And the only reason why there aren't a lot of current games for Linux is because so few people use Linux. Therefor, those companies don't want to lose money porting them overGdespite the ever increasingly desperate cries of Linux users for more games.

It isn't that desktop Linux is a serious platform. It's just that no one takes it seriously.
Mike_Acker
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Mike_Acker,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/6/2012 | 4:19:12 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
there's a reason the "Linux Madness" doesn't stop: it is going to replace MSFT for serious/business computing.

who cares about gaming ? that is where MSFT seems to be heading, particularly w/ this Win8 thing -- which makes Windows into a tablet O/S

i was right about OS/2 back in the day when all the pundits were yelling that would be the way into the future. it wasn't. now we come to another fork in the road ... with the wreckage of hacked systems littering the landscape

it's gonna be Game Over for insecure o/s
kevinski
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kevinski,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/6/2012 | 8:53:02 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
You're living in a dream world. I won't deny that Linux is well-suited to business use, but Linux's problem will always be that the people who are trying to get people to adopt it are selling it as something that can do the same things as Windows when it really doesn't have much in the way of benefits to provide.

Linux needs to do its own thing to attract people. If there's no real incentive to switch from a productivity standpoint, then people aren't going to care. Furthermore, Linux still isn't a complete replacement for Windows, because there's always *something* that'll require some sort of functionality that isn't available on Linux. Also, while there's a wide variety of programs available for Linux that can perform most of the tasks that you can perform on Windows, the open-source community's insistence on giving those programs ridiculous names prevents them from being as discoverable as they need to be.
Darr247
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Darr247,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/7/2012 | 12:28:08 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
kevinski said,
"... selling it as something that can do the same things as Windows when it really doesn't have much in the way of benefits to provide."

The only thing I've found lacking in the linux versus windows competition is a 3D CAD program. Since Autodesk tied their future to microsoft by integrating its foundation class files, there simply is no porting that to linux; WINE is not the answer... if the **only** way to replace something is by running it in WINE, then you might as well run windows.

Everything else I've needed, I have found a suitable replacement for in linux.
kevinski
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kevinski,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/7/2012 | 9:54:13 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
Having a suitable replacement for everything isn't enough. Again, Linux needs to do its own thing, and it needs to do things better than Windows, not as good as or worse than Windows. Furthermore, it'd need to increase productivity to make it worthwhile for most businesses.

A lot of Linux advocates tend to tout the cost savings that comes with switching to Linux, but businesses clearly have no problem with paying Microsoft's licensing fees (or maybe just outright pirate software), so that's a moot point. People don't care if something that's free can do the same thing as well as something that isn't free. They either want something that's familiar or easier to learn than what they already have, and Linux just isn't like that.

To some extent, I'd say that it's because of the naming conventions for a lot of open-source apps, but it's more than that. Linux has many of the same problems as Windows and Mac OS in certain respects, and I'd say that Linux is arguably worse in many respects, since it tends to play things way too safe. Sure, people may complain about some of the changes that Microsoft has made over the years (especially more recently, what with Ribbons and Metro), but they're at least making some attempts at improving productivity, even though some of those attempts are somewhat misguided.
msimko110
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msimko110,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/19/2012 | 5:36:52 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
It's better. If you don't see it, so be it. You're probably too busy fixing your computer anyway.
Mike_Acker
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Mike_Acker,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/19/2012 | 5:56:52 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
=" when it really doesn't have much in the way of benefits to provide."

as i mentioned earlier.... the halls are littered with the wreckage of hacked systems. after some study I don't see that MSFT -- or anyone -- will be able to correct the windows o/s with respect to security: the construction based on RPC leaves too many ways into the kernel. the LINUX architecture is better from the security standpoint. there are still trouble spots though, -- "MITB" comes to mind...

that said the new threat that seems to be coming up on radar is supply channel malware -- stuff that gets into the 'firmware' in the manufacturing process somehow. this will be a threat none of us are accustomed to dealing with
Darr247
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Darr247,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/7/2012 | 12:19:06 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
You would help your argument if you recommended a business-oriented distro with SELinux built in and enabled by default, like CentOS or RedHat, rather than Ubuntu.
msimko110
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msimko110,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/19/2012 | 5:34:50 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
I've taken a look at Win8 too. I can't see it being productive. The split personality of the OS is enough to make it unusable.
I got off the upgrade merry-go-round a few years ago when I went to Ubuntu. Like Mac users, I don't have the constant nag messages, nor the energy draining maintenance of a Windows system. The OS interface is more usable and familiar to me than Mac, and has some neat features like multiple desktops and super easy software installs. Win 8 is trying to copy the software install feature with the WinStore.
Now that I've been spoiled, I find using a Windows computer to be frustrating. I ain't going back. If you like Windows, that is nice. Stick with it. But you M$ fan boys should know that Linux is alive and well, and has gotten even better while you weren't looking.
TerryB
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TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
10/5/2012 | 5:09:36 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
That comment makes a lot sense in the context of this article. Author discussing why change version of Windows just for change sake and you think it is good idea to change the entire operating system instead. Here is a news flash for you...Linux upgrades their O/S also, It's the same tail chase!

I agree with Kevin completely. Our company just now replacing XP with Win 7 and I wasn't convinced we even needed to do that. The programs I use still worked just fine on XP, the o/s itself is irrelevant in a business, it's all about the apps. It will be a looonngg time before Win 8 comes in here.
FreeJAC
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FreeJAC,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/5/2012 | 5:21:38 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
There is nothing wrong with using the best tool for the job. If you have no use for better dual monitor support, touch screens, or expanding storage with a few clicks, or built-in access to a vetted software library, follow-me data and system settings, then stick with Windows 7. Also Windows 8 is not holding a gun to your head saying you must use all the new fancy UI elements. You can easily configure it to behave exactly like Windows 7 if you so desire. It's nice to have choices. I will choose Windows 8 for the betterment of the underpinnings and will ignore the new UI until I feel ready to grow into it.
Timesaver
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Timesaver,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/6/2012 | 2:25:38 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
"the best tool for the job" - "You can easily configure it to behave 'exactly' like Windows 7" - The "best tool" for most Business customers at the moment is not an OS which takes away the start menu (for good without the use of a 3rd party simulation app) and leaves users high and dry without a feature they have been using in one form or another since 1995! And how do you "ignore the UI"? These comments sound like someone who has read articles about Windows 8, but has never had much hands on experience with the OS.
BLeonard
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BLeonard,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/5/2012 | 5:24:52 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
Agree on passing. I've used the Win8 on my laptop for weeks, finally agreed it simply is not designed for the IT Professional or Corp environments. I need to run multiple items, and having a single app take my entires screen is not helpful. Yes, I can run the Desktop, but that is just a poor process in comparison to Win7. Win8 is best suited for touch-screen phone or tablet. But for serious productivity on a pc, this is a step backward. And saying switching to Linux is an answer in the Corp world with hundreds of systems and servers is not realistic without serious planning, budget, and most of all a real business reason to do so. Few will undertake doing so when Win7 works just fine and is fully supported. I would not be surprised if MS goes back to drawing board and modifies Win9 to better address pc environment.
Leo Regulus
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Leo Regulus,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/5/2012 | 5:45:39 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
Concur with Author, Mike & Terry's comments. (IMHO) XP is still a viable work horse for most people, especially SMBs. The same can be said about Office 2003. Also, show me a viable ROI for both SMBs & Enterprise G and letGs not be using todaysG political Gfuzzy mathG.
Touch Screen? I worked with a corporation that put Touch Screens on Win 95 POS units before Win 98 hit the streets. Anyone associated with that product will tell you that it was G and still is G an extremely viable commercial product in that environment. The point here is: Where the heck has MS been for about 15 years?
Yes, I have Win 8 loaded in a VM. It fails to attract me. I also have several flavors of Linux loaded in multiple-boot configurations on several other units. I enjoy using them significantly more than Win 8. Much less frustration and a lot more convenience & ease of use.
But, everyone to their own opinion. Your mileage may differ.
gfish66
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gfish66,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/5/2012 | 6:14:12 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
Kevin, I couldn't agree more, and I've been a Microsoftie since the 1980s.
sonicmetalman
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sonicmetalman,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/5/2012 | 6:18:23 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
What I liked about the Windows 8 Enterprise Eval - it performed better on older hardware than Windows 7 did. Unfortunately that was it. Honestly I cannot see the Enterprise version really working in an office environment without using the available 3rd party menu tweaks.

Lack of sales could force MS to alter the Enterprise version back to the standard desktop model. I would bet that contingency has already been discussed in Redmond and could be easily implemented. This is assuming of course that Ballmer finds a way to spin this as anything other than the debacle we know it will be.

MS may have inadvertently created a divergent path for Enterprise computing to explore Linux desktops. Certainly Apple can reap benefits from this fork in the road.
reversehalo
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reversehalo,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/5/2012 | 7:10:37 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
Millions will heartily disagree with you. The primary reason: Approximately 40 to 50% of the marketplace still use Windows XP. Their computers are on average 8 years old or greater. It's time to upgrade. I fully expect Windows 8 to surpass sales of Windows 95. Millions will gladly upgrade. The second reason, there are significant technological improvements found in Windows 8 - something that nearly every article that I read seems to completely overlook. Technological improvements in Windows 8 (not in Windows 7) include UEFI, ReFs, File History, etc. Increased data integrity. Increased malware protection. Also, the upgrade process will be low in cost. On average, $15. Other related items being released at the same time - Windows App Store, Windows Phone 8, brick and mortar Windows Stores throughout the United States, Windows Surface Tablets, Office 2013, etc., etc., etc.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F...
Mark532010
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Mark532010,
User Rank: Strategist
10/13/2012 | 4:09:26 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
I am sure millions will purchase Win8. it will be preinstalled on all new computers soon. However your comment on the cost of upgrading shows a lack of thought - at least for the corporate environment. If the computer must be replaced, the cost will be significantly more than $15. If the computer does not need to be replaced, first I doubt there will be wholesale adoption, most companies are reluctantly moving from XP to 7, but even if they do adopt the infrastructure and support training costs far outweigh the software itself.

For example, some things to consider in moving from XP to Win8:

Ghost-style build processes do not work with Win8 (due to SID changes) and must be replaced by sysprep/AIK ( a whole new system that is quite complex especially when multi-casting is required)

Win8 cannot be locked down adequately by server 2003 domain GPO's, requiring a domain upgrade to at least hybrid mode and then a complete revisit of the corporate GPO's - and trying to make them work correctly will probably be a long and expensive task. Even simple GPO functions like preventing access to some control panel applets are completely different in Win7/8 GPO's's and have to be carefully researched to make sure they work the same. Another example, We are currently working through a longterm problem where by locking down to prevent users from messing up their video settings, the IE icon on the desktop disappears despite no mention of it in the GPO setting descriptions - this is what the world of Win7 GPO's is like and Win8 doubles the number of items over Win7!

Server2003 Print Servers will not distribute Win8 print drivers, necessating upgrades of print servers to server 2008 (or 2012, I am unsure)

Even ignoring the cost of user-level training, the support-level changes can be daunting and will require retraining support staff on changes in support procedures - examples just for profiles: processes for bulk deletion of old profiles no longer work under 8, changing to roaming profiles - particularly during the interim when both environments are in place and users are moving from one environment to another and then supporting it, requiring sysprep to modify the "default profile" (are you familiar with how to modify the default IE settings in the default profile on 8 using sysprep? it requires significant training), etc.

many customized scripts need to be located and revisited due to the change in location of objects (c:\documents and settings now becomes c:\users, c:\program files versus c:\program Files (x86), etc.

We are finishing up an XP to 7 migration and the biggest headache was in checking each and every program for compatibility. We use a LOT of old (some are 1990's era) software and many of them would not run, requiring either extensive (expensive) compatibility modification or purchasing replacements. Which is good in the long run but requires cash and training and complaints because it doesn't work the same.

No, the actual cost of upgrading from XP to 8 is far more than simply buying a new license and that total cost must be carefully weighed by management when making decisions.
moonwatcher
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moonwatcher,
User Rank: Strategist
10/5/2012 | 7:50:34 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
OK, if I already had Win 7, then yeah, I'd make the same choice. But for many of us hold outs still stuck on XP, upgrading for $40 makes sense, especially to get latest versions of software (for instance Solidworks 2013 will not run on XP, but will run on Win 8) - since Win 8 under the hood is really the same (from the application's standpoint) as Win 7. If upgrading from XP to Win 8 allows me to get a couple more years use out of my desktop PC, (and doesn't break anything), then it is a good deal.
RichMNY
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RichMNY,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/7/2012 | 11:09:21 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
Nope, bad choice, best choice to upgrade from XP is Windows 7.
GAProgrammer
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GAProgrammer,
User Rank: Ninja
10/8/2012 | 6:01:37 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
You'll be fine - don't listen to these close-minded people. I have used 8 extensively and have rarely had a problem (once I got to the interface. It doesn't take long if you actually TRY.)

Should Microsoft have left the Start button? Hell yes. Does it make the desktop unusable? NO WAY! It works just the same.
moonwatcher
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moonwatcher,
User Rank: Strategist
2/8/2013 | 2:45:17 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
Unfortunately, RichMNY is right. After doing more research I determined that my Dell PC's BIOS does not support a feature (some type of data execution process - DEP) that Windows 8 requires. And Dell provides no upgrade. So, instead of upgrading for $40 to Windows 8, I'm faced with paying $75 for an OEM version of Windows 7 64-bit. Oh well, at least I can get a couple more years of use out of my aging Core 2 Duo PC that way. BTW, I have tried Windows 8. It's OK, sort of like the Gadgets in Vista on steroids with all the "app tiles" on the start screen. It is easy enough to get to the real desktop, but I put Start8 from Star Dock on it for my sister so it'll take her directly to it, and bypass the nearly useless apps. I'm sure they'll be fine on a tablet, but not for a desktop PC.
FMANFREDI327
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FMANFREDI327,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/5/2012 | 8:54:29 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
I agree, I was working as computer operations manager in an IBM mainframe environment back in the 1980's. They had just come out with an OS release and I asked my manager if we would do the upgrade right away. He said no, he would wait until the updated, bug free release, because pioneers get arrows in their A__!. I found that to be good advice in my career, if the existing technology is working, I will stay with it, until there is a good reason to upgrade.
Faye Kane, homeless brain
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Faye Kane, homeless brain,
User Rank: Strategist
10/6/2012 | 12:52:31 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
==--
> If you have no use for better dual monitor support,

...Thank you, MS Marketing department employee, but I have dual monitors and they work great, but thank you anyway.

> touch screens

Buy a $100 O/S and a new $300 monitor so I can raise my arm to the screen every time I want to click a button?

HAHAAH! I don't THINK so!

> follow-me data and system settings

I'll keep my config settings on my laptop, thank you.

> or expanding storage with a few clicks,

You mean "let Microsoft hold my data for me instead of keeping it on my hard drive where it belongs". Why would I want to load my documents over-a slow 10 MB/s internet connection instead of my 6 GB/s hard drive, when 2TB drives are now under $100?

And why should I hand over all my data to Microsoft so they can charge my ATM card every month and hold my critical documents for ransom if I don't pay tribute to Ballmer?

Is it as a backup to my local storage? I have two drives, and a batch file copies all the changed stuff onto the backup every night.

Why would a small business want to let Microsoft be a slow, expensive substitute for a hard drive? Why is that even a suggestion anyone takes seriously?

> built-in access to a vetted software library

You mean run Office from a MS server so they can charge me for that too every month. This is better for my business?

Why should I run office at all, when the open source version does the same things better (no "ribbon") and is free? In a small business, cost matters.

And I DON'T want MS to have its hand in my business (not to mention my pocket)! Why would I expose myself to their system outages, security flaws, and hacker attacks for no reason whatsoever? And PAY for all this, when it's completely unnecessary?

You say 8 can be made to look like 7? I already have an O/S that looks like Win7.

> then stick with Windows 7

OKAY!

I'm sure a lot of people will take you up on that suggestion too!

Your employer, Microsoft, knows dam well that 8 is unusable. They're trying to force us to buy a tablet OS which is grotesque on a desktop, figuring that people will then buy their Metro tablets and telephones.

GIt's not for us users, it's for Microsoft.

That's so obvious that I feel embarrassed saying so. I feel like the kid who pointed out that the Emperor is naked, and the adults continue to pretend to take him seriously.

Win 8 is the best example of Microsoft arrogance yet, and the predictable disaster will finally be enough for even Gates to acknowledge that Ballmer has run their company into the ground.

8 will go down in business school history as "Ballmer's last mistake".

--faye
Faye Kane, homeless brain
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Faye Kane, homeless brain,
User Rank: Strategist
10/6/2012 | 1:09:26 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
==--
> If you have no use for better dual monitor support,

...Thank you, MS Marketing department employee, but I have dual monitors and they work great, but thank you anyway.

> touch screens

Buy a $100 O/S and a new $300 monitor so I can raise my arm to the screen every time I want to click a button?

HAHAAH! I don't THINK so!

> follow-me data and system settings

I'll keep my config settings on my laptop, thank you.

> or expanding storage with a few clicks,

You mean "let Microsoft hold my data for me instead of keeping it on my hard drive where it belongs". Why would I want to load my documents over a slow 10 MB/s internet connection instead of my 6 GB/s hard drive, when 2TB drives are now under $100?

And why should I hand over all my data to Microsoft so they can charge my ATM card every month and hold my critical documents for ransom if I don't pay tribute to Ballmer?

Is it as a backup to my local storage? I have two drives, and a batch file copies all the changed stuff onto the backup every night.

Why would a small business want to let Microsoft be a slow, expensive substitute for a hard drive? Why is that even a suggestion anyone takes seriously?

> built-in access to a vetted software library

You mean run Office from a MS server so they can charge me for that too every month. This is better for my business?

Why should I run office at all, when the open source version does the same things better (no "ribbon") and is free? In a small business, cost matters.

And I DON'T want MS to have its hand in my business (not to mention my pocket)! Why would I expose myself to their system outages, security flaws, and hacker attacks for no reason whatsoever? And PAY for all this, when it's completely unnecessary?

You say 8 can be made to look like 7? I already have an O/S that looks like Win7.

> then stick with Windows 7

OKAY!

I'm sure a lot of people will take you up on that suggestion too!

Your employer, Microsoft, knows dam well that 8 is unusable. They're trying to force us to buy a tablet OS which is grotesque on a desktop, figuring that people will then buy their Metro tablets and telephones.

GIt's not for us users, it's for Microsoft.

That's so obvious that I feel embarrassed saying so. I feel like the kid who pointed out that the Emperor is naked, and the adults continue to pretend to take him seriously.

Win 8 is the best example of Microsoft arrogance yet, and the predictable disaster will finally be enough for even Gates to acknowledge that Ballmer has run their company into the ground.

8 will go down in business school history as "Ballmer's last mistake".

--faye
moarsauce123
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moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
10/6/2012 | 3:32:43 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
You're missing the point. A lot of users (even in SMBs) are using tablets and mobile form factors outside of the workplace.

There's a productivity gap when they come into the workplace and have to switch operating systems to work with 'in house' software versus 'mobile' software.

Windows 8 bridges that gap. Same device at home as at work. Same software. Same cloud back end. Same identity system.

Then there's the devices - the PC industry is about to go an a huge journey where devices go from laptop form factor to a more flexible form factor where touch, mouse, keyboard and pen all come into play - once users see this, they won't want to go back to the devices that they had before.

The idea that anyone would spend more than about 30 minutes 'learning to use' Windows 8 is not realistic. The old UI is largely as it was. The new UI is simple. A child can figure it out in no time at all.

Then the idea that 'Windows 7 is good enough' is an interesting one. Why not have a PC that boots faster? That makes better use of battery life? That has more file system options? That has easier backup options? That has new virtualisation and multi-monitor options? i.e. Why not have a better Windows 7 == Windows 8.

You say that the two things that you do most often are 'typing and talking on the phone'. Which operating system is going to be *key* for Microsoft to target with their new versions of Word, Lync and Skype? That's going to be Windows 8.

It's also interesting to hear people in the comments say that the desktop in Windows 8 is 'poor' compared to Windows 7. What's poor about it? One thing has been removed - the Start Menu which most power users don't use anyway. Everything else is improvement or neutral. So, where does 'poor' come from?
moarsauce123
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50%
moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
10/6/2012 | 7:47:08 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
There is no discussion as that someone can figure out the new UI, but the new UI does not provide any significant improvements when not using a touch enabled device. On a standard desktop with non-touch display it is even more annoying. Aside from the no longer called Metro UI there is nothing in W8 that cannot be done with W7. So why spend money and effort on switching? W8 on a tablet, yes, on a desktop, no.
RichMNY
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50%
RichMNY,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/7/2012 | 11:07:16 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
Great for tablets and smartphones, makes no sense for desktop computers.
GAProgrammer
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50%
GAProgrammer,
User Rank: Ninja
10/8/2012 | 6:05:08 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
Very valid point here - there isn't much difference between 7 and 8. However, at $40, why wouldn't you? However, from XP to something, might as well go to 8.
Mark532010
50%
50%
Mark532010,
User Rank: Strategist
10/13/2012 | 4:30:38 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
There are some good points for Windows 8. Most of your comments do not reflect corporate use though. Boot faster? With pre-login security processes, our computers take several minutes to boot, that Win8 can shave a few seconds off that has zero impact on anyone. Batterylife is not applicable to plugged in desktop units. Same identity system - not applicable since in the office they will use the corporate login and not their live/gmail login. What Microsoft should be pushing is for a way to link corprorate AD domain accounts to the live/gmail ones so people really can work on something at home, save it on skydrive, come to work and log in with their domain account and still securely access their skydrive files.

training is a tough one, I think some people will grab it easily and others will require extensive multi-hour training and be far less productive for years as they constantly switch between the two environments (i.e. Loading a doc in word versus loading a pdf is a completely different system)

In my personal experience, I would say 75% of the users I support would not want Win8 - some because of the one-app-per-screen limitations, but primarily because of the lack of customization. Currently, each and every user individually changes their background, screen resolution and font size carefully until they get one that works for them and shows the amount on the screen they want. They will simply not accept a metro environment that imposes a single unchangeable startscreen background, resolution and font size in the apps. people seem to be ok with it on tablets, but on the desktop where they run their lives by having 8 screens open, I would really doubt Metro would be welcome.
Suiris
50%
50%
Suiris,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/7/2012 | 11:36:07 AM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
Here's why I am in no rush to upgrade to Windows 8...because I already did...and already went back to Windows 7. Having an MSDN subscription I have access to Windows 8 prior to retail release. I recently purchased my computer hardware about 1 month ago with the intentions of going Windows 8 and for some other areas I'm going into such as HQ photography. Win 8 certified MB, 8x core CPU, 16GB ram, SSD drives, CrossfireX, 24" LED monitor, etc... Now since I just put this all together and re-installed there isn't any heavy lifting to be done on my system. Some things are installed but not a lot. MS Office, browsers, plugins, a few games, chat programs, etc. I spent 20 minutes imaging my system drive before upgrading to Win8...I spend the next 90 minutes letting Windows 8 upgrade my system. Upon install the overs-can on my video card was set to 15%; No big deal, driver setting, right? The driver no longer had the same options as before even though it was a direct driver, not the MS one. No where to change it back to 0%. For those who don't know, the over-scan turned on when not needed causes a black border around of the edge of the screen. OK, I'll just re-install the driver... a 100 MB+ download and in a few minutes I'm ready... ....run driver software... 1st file "uncompressing 100%" and stalls. 10 minutes later and it hasn't moved. Have to force close the installer. Ugh. This driver says it's for Win 8 (and 7)... So, maybe a reboot will do it... "Windows is restarting..." 15 minutes later "Windows is restarting..." Reset button, recover CD, re-image back to Windows 7. Bye-bye Windows 8. Yes, I'm aware this was an upgrade but I'm also aware that my hardware was certified for windows 8 and I had relatively little installed to cause a problem with upgrade. Win 8 even forced me to uninstall some Intel network card software that came with my MB to make sure things didn't go bad, which I did.

It was unacceptable to have a clean upgrade just go out to lunch in the first 30 minutes on trivial things like software install and reboot.

Under windows 7 I go from "Loading Windows" to desktop in 10 seconds or less and that includes me entering my password. I'm told Windows 8 is faster... I say, maybe it is if it works... but even if it's 8 seconds... Am I to complain about 2 seconds?

I'm contemplated a clean install but geesh, it's the principle here. I shouldn't HAVE to fresh install just to get it to work.

That's my 2 cents.
augman
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augman,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/7/2012 | 4:45:42 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
Has anyone forgotten Windows Vista?
RichMNY
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50%
RichMNY,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/7/2012 | 11:04:49 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
Nope ... Windows 8 is another Windows Vista MS blunder.
carolinaman
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50%
carolinaman,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/7/2012 | 5:39:27 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
I love 8 its twice as fast loading, faster surfing, and a lot more security wise. I have the start menu loaded from stardock.com, so its like 7 but different.
Skendall
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50%
Skendall,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/7/2012 | 6:18:33 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
Been on Windows 8 since the MSDN release, faster than 7 and really liking the tiles. Windows 8 systems work excellent with Direct Access/connect and Server 2012 making it an excellent way for workers to always be on the corporate LAN regardless of the physical location. This makes IT MUCH easier and intranet only programs to function 24/7. When surface releases I can see corporate laptop purchases disappearing in favor of tablets that are always on the corporate LAN with access to all corporate assets. We have already adapted to Windows phones and have at least 80% less support calls because there is simply no integration needed. The phones just work in a corporate environment without requiring APPS other than what is on the phone. If you havent looked at the connection between Server 2012 and 8, please have your IT Department check it out.
DHBarr
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50%
DHBarr,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/7/2012 | 6:40:06 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
I have to say I did a Win 8 Webinar and was somewhat impressed. Win 8 seems like a logical progression and update to Win 7. That said, I agree that you won't see a lot of business adoption of Win 8 until Microsoft gets its act together on Office 2013. Win 8 has some terrific synchronization features between multiple devices (your tablet, laptop, and desktop for example - all synchronized for you automatically) - but those features are most needed in the business environment by people running office, and especially OUTLOOK.
When your Win8 lock screen is monitoring outlook for you, and the email and calendar are automatically syncronized with all your devices - then I can make a case for it to my business clients. Until that happens - Win 7 is just fine.
beancube
50%
50%
beancube,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/7/2012 | 9:47:17 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
The climate of the economy is the major concern. This kind of upgrade is not going to help users. Looking good technologies don't match reality and are perceived almost as evil as covering up for Wall St insiders economic exploitations.
RichMNY
50%
50%
RichMNY,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/7/2012 | 10:58:26 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
Totally agree. Windows 8 is designed for tablets and smartphones. Makes no sense for a desktop PC to behave like that, sticking with Windows 7 which I am very satisfied with. BTW, I have a smartphone, happy with this type of interface for this type of device.
regbs
50%
50%
regbs,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/7/2012 | 11:05:05 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
Note to self: if I ever get tired of a real job, become a tech blogger and write inane, time-wasting, useless crap like why I'm not getting Windows 8. Do people and publications actually survive on this tripe? Answer: Yes, which is awesome! Good on you, Kevin Casey. I need to start blogs and YouTube channels on how to fold towels, tie my shoes, and keep-up-or-keep-right rules of traffic-flow on the freeway.

Using SMB instead of writing it out. What a savvy connected guy! I can't wait to read what you set your screen brightness to.
Mark532010
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50%
Mark532010,
User Rank: Strategist
10/13/2012 | 3:39:02 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
I work in K-12 and I can see some benefits of Win8. The main screen with its big clickable icons is exactly what the elementary schools need - assuming we can enforce an unchangeable homogenous one - and the full-screen only paradigm will work well for that age group, though I hope we can turn off most of the functionality of the charms bars via gpo otherwise it is just play time.

on the other hand I believe the staff will have real difficulties. Yesterday I had a tech call because the user could not find Outlook. Their "mail" icon was no longer on the desktop and they were unable to find it because it was "hidden" inside of the "Microsoft Office" menu and wasn't named "mail" but "Microsoft Outlook 2010" - now imagine this person attempting to find documents, each program has a different system of locating files. Office 2010 uses a standard file-selector with "computer" and mapped drives, but if they click on a picture, they are in a completely different environment and finding the next picture uses a completely different method.

Just the idea that sometimes you use the task bar at the bottom and sometimes you have to go to the left side and swipe down to find a running program is going to cause massive headaches
Number 6
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Number 6,
User Rank: Moderator
10/16/2012 | 4:45:15 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
Excellent point. Most users are not IT experts. I work with people who know one and only way to access their files. Teaching them more than approach just confuses them and gets in the way of what they truly want: to get their work done.

Every time a GUI changes, users get confused and frustrated. Why would any business willingly seek that?
gchanman
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50%
gchanman,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/16/2012 | 6:31:55 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
One word should make you want to upgrade, BIOS. Second word, VIRUS. Real Windows 8 machines will no longer use a BIOS.

Ever had a root or BIOS virus? Hours and hours of wasted time. Best overview writeup I have seen is here, granted it is government related but most of it also applies to small businesses as well.

http://gcn.com/articles/2012/1...

JamesFaction
50%
50%
JamesFaction,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/4/2013 | 4:50:14 AM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
Your article starts off saying "Windows 7 is fine, why should I bother?" the answer to that is Windows 8 is faster at everything, more efficient, and supports hardware and connectivity of all kinds better than Windows 7. Yet the article states "I couldn't come up with any good answers".

THEN you did this odd newbie thing: You confused software with hardware.

Windows 8 is not a tablet.

Windows 8 can run on a tablet and works great with touchscreens.

But you don't need a touchscreen to run Windows 8.

I've been running Windows 8 on my 3-year-old non-touchscreen laptop (it weighs about 5 pounds too) and it runs far far better than Windows 7. Granted, the new Start menu took a bit of getting used to - for about a week. It didn't slow me down much, if at all, and the advantages of Windows 8 shone through for me really quickly once I started using it for work and play, day to day.

Far too much FUD out there about Windows 8. The truth is, Microsoft has done a really good job under the hood, and the GUI is actually good too. Get in there and upgrade already.
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