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5/30/2013
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Kevin Casey
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Windows 8.1: Thanks For Listening, Microsoft

Consumers will keep chasing new and shiny; business users will keep working on a PC. Microsoft finally appears to understand that.

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A confession: The original headline for this article was "Don't Forget About Us, Microsoft." By "us" I meant PC users, and especially business users. We'd previously been assigned standing room in the cattle car on Microsoft's continuing journey with Windows 8 and beyond.

I hit pause after new reports of what Microsoft will change in Windows 8.1 began appearing Wednesday afternoon. Hallelujah -- it appears Microsoft's actually listening to its customers.

The company on Thursday officially announced many of the changes in a blog post. And yes, they include the return of the Start button -- even if Microsoft's not calling it that. 8.1 will also include more boot options and Start screen customizations, built-in SkyDrive integration, and other updates. A full Windows 8.1 preview will be unveiled next month at Microsoft's developer conference.

[ What other tweaks has Microsoft made in Windows 8.1? Read Windows 8.1 Restores Start Button, With Twist. ]

The news should be at least partially reassuring to PC users who didn't love Windows 8 out of the gate, in part because it was a one-size-fits-all approach to a wide range of hardware -- much of which doesn't yet support touch. Windows 8 as currently constructed felt like over-compensation as Microsoft attempts to crack the consumer mobility market that Apple and Google have dominated to date. Microsoft's public commentary on the matter indicated as much. "Windows 8 redefines our market from PCs to mobile computing," read a recent blog post. This from the company whose software powers more than 90% of computers around the world.

The tune changed on Thursday, albeit slightly. Microsoft's sticking to its touch guns, but acknowledged that it's not currently optimal for plenty of users: "We also recognize there are many non-touch devices in use today -- especially in the commercial setting," corporate VP Antoine Leblond wrote on the Windows Blog. "As such we've focused on a number of improvements to ensure easier navigation for people using a mouse and keyboard."

You could argue that it shouldn't have taken this long for Microsoft to realize that. I say: Better late than never. Good on ya, Microsoft.

While we're here, can we give this "death of the PC" thing a rest? The PC is a commodity. Commodities, like toothpaste, aren't sexy; they're necessary. This doesn't make for a good growth story on Wall Street, nor a cool trend story on Madison Avenue. Tablets and tablet-like devices are new, they're shiny, and people are buying them. Lots of them. PCs have been around for forever and a day, and people -- consumers, in particular -- are buying fewer of them than they used to.

That doesn't mean millions of professionals no longer need full-featured, powerful desktops or laptops (aka notebooks) to do their jobs. Take anyone who relies heavily on computer-aided design (CAD) applications -- engineers, architects, designers, and the like. I've heard from several readers in these fields who've pointed out that heavy-duty CAD work just isn't suited for tablets or phones, at least not yet.

The same typically holds true in roles that require heavy content creation or data entry -- accountants, say, or writers. Does it mean these pros don't embrace mobility? Of course not -- many also tote tablets and certainly smartphones, too, especially in BYOD offices. And an increasing number of "traditional" PCs will no doubt include touchscreens. None of this means the PC is disappearing. (Video did not, in fact, kill the radio star.) PCs will remain necessary in many corporate environments, just as tablets and other devices will be increasingly important in certain jobs. There's room for both.

There's a common perception problem with necessities, though: They're usually kind of boring, unless maybe you're making million-dollar bets on the future price of oil or wheat. Social sites like Facebook are hot; toothpaste is not. But guess which one I'd give up first? (People who don't use toothpaste? Not often hot.)

Windows 8.1 ushers in a new Windows era of shorter, faster development-and-release cycles. In recent interviews with InformationWeek, Forrester senior analyst David Johnson pointed out that shift has a lot of upside for IT and businesses as a whole. Among the potential boons: Making it easier for organizations to stay current and reducing IT management burdens.

Of course, it has a downside, too. If Microsoft uses a more frequent release cycle as a means to chase the latest consumer trend or shareholder pressure -- rather than actually listening to customers and addressing their needs -- business users stand to lose. And there will always be something newer and cooler that gets consumers all riled up. Something will eventually usher in the "death of the tablet," too, even though tablets -- like the PCs that came before them -- probably aren't going anywhere.

No one should blame Microsoft for hunting the Almighty Consumer; it doesn't have much choice. It's just that the hunt shouldn't come at the expense of people who rely on computers to do their jobs. We don't really care if the new Angry Birds app is available; we do care whether our devices -- Microsoft's new word of choice -- are usable, productive tools for work.

This is a step in the right direction, an acknowledgement that tablets and desktops aren't the same thing, that people use technology for different reasons, and that the "world that blends our work and personal lives" may be more of a lifestyle issue than a computing problem. Microsoft appears to be using the first wave of the 8.x model as an opportunity to listen to what customers -- even us boring PC users -- actually want.

Thanks for that.

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Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
5/31/2013 | 8:25:24 PM
re: Windows 8.1: Thanks For Listening, Microsoft
Agreed. Mobile devices will never be useful for that sort of work-- though desktop computers are already starting to resemble, and sometimes even function as, giant tablets. That shift is form factor doesn't mean users will stop using a mouse and keyboard, but I think it shows that even users with specialized needs will soon find a variety of device types to choose from. And for users with general needs, the sky's the limit: for this group, the functionality a smartphone provides is about 80% of the functionality they'd use in a high-end PC. Tablets only narrow that gap.

This explosion in choice is, more than anything, what the slow PC market is really about. Tablets aren't going to take over all tasks anymore than desktop PCs are going to go extinct; rather, tablets are just a sign that the ways we define "computer" aren't adequate anymore.

The question for Microsoft is this: with so many device types out there, can Windows 8 successfully span so many sizes, form factors and use cases?
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
5/31/2013 | 8:16:10 PM
re: Windows 8.1: Thanks For Listening, Microsoft
Lots of good tips-- thanks for those. But you also raise an important point: are the people who dislike Windows 8 primarily desktop users? At least one recent study concluded that even Win8 tablet users have little use for Modern apps, which isn't conclusive-- but I think it reaffirms that Microsoft needs to more than restore the Start button. It's important that Microsoft avoid further alienating disgruntled desktop users-- but it's also important (arguably even more important, for the short term, given where most businesses are in their refresh cycles) that Windows 8 establish some BYOD/ consumer action. Some BYOD users will be driven by the chance to carry Office on a cheap tablet, so once the Haswell and Bay Trail tablets arrive, Win8 will make some gains no matter what. But to grow outside niche segments, Windows 8.1 needs more.

Michael Endler, IW Associate Editor
GAProgrammer
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GAProgrammer,
User Rank: Strategist
5/31/2013 | 7:33:39 PM
re: Windows 8.1: Thanks For Listening, Microsoft
I haven't even used the crazy hierarchy since I can type the first few letters and get a list of programs (including the one I want). You have the same methodology in Win8, so I don't see the problem as anything but people clinging to the old, inefficient way of doing things.
I can do calculus with an abacus, but it doesn't mean it is better - and I probably shouldn't.
GAProgrammer
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GAProgrammer,
User Rank: Strategist
5/31/2013 | 7:31:38 PM
re: Windows 8.1: Thanks For Listening, Microsoft
To defend that statement, I am 41 and agree - PCs have been around since I was in middle school, which was "forever and a day" ago ;-)
remmeler
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remmeler,
User Rank: Strategist
5/31/2013 | 7:21:44 PM
re: Windows 8.1: Thanks For Listening, Microsoft
People have always added third party programs to customize Windows. Many of those features that were popular from third parties were eventually added by M/S as standard.

One reason people go with M/S systems is the availability of third party solutions to customize the system which is not usually available with Apple systems.
remmeler
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remmeler,
User Rank: Strategist
5/31/2013 | 7:18:45 PM
re: Windows 8.1: Thanks For Listening, Microsoft
I don't know if this qualifies but when you add a program it seems to automatically add tiles for all the sub programs, which I find nice.

For example when you add the program AnyDVD you also get tiles. You get one for the program, one for the Ripper, one for AnnyDVD System Information and one for the Image Ripper.

Another example would be HD Homerun, you also get tiles for The config, and setup and one for Quick TV.

I sometimes would install a program and not look and be aware of the programs that came with it, now it is automatically put on the Front End in Tiles. I find it helpful.

Of course people are going to complain about all those tiles, but the ones you don't want to see can be unpinned.

It seems hierarchical, in a way, to me.
moarsauce123
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moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
5/31/2013 | 6:22:55 PM
re: Windows 8.1: Thanks For Listening, Microsoft
Great tips, but neither of one addresses the lack of having a hierarchical menu structure available that can be customized to quickly link to applications and any kind of document or web resource. There is no such thing on Metro and viewing all files and folders via File Explorer is quite far from a usable alternative.
moarsauce123
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moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
5/31/2013 | 6:19:06 PM
re: Windows 8.1: Thanks For Listening, Microsoft
There are basically no users who use apps on desktops. Apps are of use for the limited capabilities of phones and tablets. Even a cheap standard desktop is beefy enough to run real programs so there is no need to bother with the very limited capabilities of apps. Aside from that, there are hardly any Win8 apps to begin with - another aspect that Microsoft just doesn't get.
moarsauce123
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moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
5/31/2013 | 6:16:21 PM
re: Windows 8.1: Thanks For Listening, Microsoft
"As for the "Start Button", if you want it, get one of the new free utilities or spend $5 on the one from StarDock..."
Agreed...but why do customers have to go through extra trouble for that after spending quite a bit on Win8?
moarsauce123
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moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
5/31/2013 | 5:26:51 PM
re: Windows 8.1: Thanks For Listening, Microsoft
The button alone is useless! Microsoft did not listen to PC users at all, otherwise they would add the start menu back. Aside from looking hideous and having tiles that are just friggin huge Metro lacks any kind of hierarchical organizational scheme. That is what the start menu provides on as little space as possible. Especially with many applications installed using the start menu is quite more user friendly than the flat structure of Metro that requires half an hour of vertical scrolling.
Win8 is a flop and the lack of listening to users will cause 8.1 to flop even more. There is just no benefit or value in Win 8.
<<   <   Page 2 / 3   >   >>
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