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3/30/2013
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Windows Blue: What We Know

Will Windows Blue, Windows 8's successor, be a nail in the coffin of traditional PCs? Here are 5 key facts that have emerged.

4. Windows Blue devices will come in a variety of sizes.

Judging from mounting evidence, Microsoft is very keen to make a splash with smaller tablets, a market that, as the iPad Mini's success attests, has become quite popular.

A March 12 Windows Certification Newsletter delivered the latest indication that Microsoft is eyeing the iPad Mini and Nexus 7's turf. With the posting, Redmond lowered Windows 8's minimum resolution standards; whereas certification has previously required 1366x768-pixel resolution, Microsoft will now approve devices equipped with only 1024-768-pixel screens.

Typically, larger, 10-inch tablets utilize high-definition screens. But as the iPad Mini's 1024x768-pixel resolution has demonstrated, buyers are willing to trade display density for smaller form factors and lower prices.

Combined with reports that Microsoft is incentivizing OEMs to focus on small-screened Windows 8 devices, the newest development strongly suggest Windows Blue will be well represented by 7-inch tablet models. Indeed, some have already predicted a Surface-branded "Reader" that leverages Microsoft's Barnes & Noble investment. If nothing else, those who found the Surface RT intriguing but too expensive could see many more appealingly-priced RT models hit the market.

Windows Blue involves more than just diminutive tablets, of course--and given that a Retina-equipped iPad Mini might appear later this year, Redmond's interest in other form factors is wise.

According to the leaked build, Windows Blue includes increased support for particularly high-resolution screens, and Microsoft executives have repeatedly mentioned that Windows 8 is engineered to scale to different screen sizes. If lightweight tablets aren't your thing, Windows Blue should debut in many other shapes and sizes.

5. Apps remain a key factor.

Even with Windows Blue's enhancements, the Modern UI's app store continues to trail those of its major competitors. Redmond has been proactive on this front, launching upgrades to several Windows 8 core apps and, in a somewhat more questionable move, offering programmers $100 bonuses for each new app. But Redmond still needs to do more; no matter what improvements Blue brings, Microsoft will need inspired efforts from developers if it is to threaten Apple and Google's tablet dominance.

Office president DelBene's remarks about touch functions are an encouraging sign that Microsoft is exploring user experiences that its competitors have yet to bring to market. A report that Microsoft has assembled a secret team to build "risky" apps is more encouraging still. But until these indications translate to results, Windows 8 will be fighting an uphill battle, with or without Blue's enhancements.

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GBARRINGTON196
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GBARRINGTON196,
User Rank: Strategist
3/30/2013 | 2:26:41 PM
re: Windows Blue: What We Know
I've already loaded Linux as a dual boot. It is clear Microsoft and I are headed down different paths. Once I find acceptable replacements for my photo applications (Adobe Lightroom, mostly), I'm done.

Even so, Microsoft COULD try to explain why my concerns are irrelevant. Their assumption that I will do whatever they want is kind of demeaning and irritating.
GAProgrammer
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GAProgrammer,
User Rank: Strategist
4/2/2013 | 3:17:59 PM
re: Windows Blue: What We Know
You mean like Apple? To be fair though, you are going the Linux route.
Terabyte Net
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Terabyte Net,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/30/2013 | 3:39:59 PM
re: Windows Blue: What We Know
All the hoopla around the traditional desktop is moot. Just hop over and download Classic Shell and bingo, no more Metro garbage, fully functional Start button, and a nice :P stuck out to MS over their garbage GUI. As long as Classic Shell works who cares what MS does to the GUI. As a stockholder if they don't start selling a boat load more copies of Windows I'm betting there are going to be changes at MS whether Balmer and Co. like it or not.
rpasea
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rpasea,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/30/2013 | 6:54:00 PM
re: Windows Blue: What We Know
This only reinforces once again how arrogant MSFT is. Why care what users want?? We are hanging on to XP and Win7 as long as we can. If MSFT refuses to keep the "modern" (fisher price) interface optional, we will be looking for alternatives.
Loerps
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Loerps,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/5/2013 | 9:05:55 PM
re: Windows Blue: What We Know
Not sure introducing a new idea and risking the biggest piece of your financial pie to do it would be considered arrogant. Risky, yes; foolish, maybe; arrogant, not so much. It wouldn't be the first time a company took a big-time risk to put forward a new idea.


Also, I find it interesting that some folks, including you apparently, refer to the "modern" UI as "fisher price", implying that it is for children, yet complain of how "hard" it is to use. Seems to me that those two notions are contradictory.
rsotol028
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rsotol028,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/30/2013 | 7:24:55 PM
re: Windows Blue: What We Know
Modern UI is the future, some say that GUI is like a toy, not mature etc. but if you think so, then stay with xp, vista or 7.
the whole os someday is going to be all Modern UI replacing the traditional desktop. of course microsoft needs more time to polish, finish it, and complete it.
and please, microsoft make it one or 2 os's only, with 64 bit only (with 32 bit capability). ie Modern UI needs a zoom button.
make a version for america with the most common languages in the continent: spanish, english, portuguese. thats my recomendations for them.
im a windows user since 3.1.
Palpatine
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Palpatine,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/2/2013 | 1:09:58 PM
re: Windows Blue: What We Know
The fact MS is going bankrupt in the effort to impose Metro does not mean it is the future. It only means MS will face smaller and smaller interest from end users, that means keep running current non 8 machines and start switching most of the tast to non Windows machines. That is happening right now.

The fact MS is going bankrupt in the effort to impose Metro does not mean it is innovative: it is a Zune like abomination barely on par with Windows 2.0 as for usability, and its sole purpose is giving better placement to Bing adware.
flubaluba
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flubaluba,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/3/2013 | 6:56:52 PM
re: Windows Blue: What We Know
Having used metro style desktop on a phone with windows phone 8 i am surprised anyone would want to use the desktop as much, yes file manager is going to be needed that is what we use to control where our files go and how we want to setup our systems to our liking, but Metro is just so amazing, it is way better than the desktop in my opinion, and is actually easy to use, simple to create more tiles and link them to programs, simple to keep all the old stuff working actually.
I think people are generally scared that they are going to lose file manager , which they are not, they are just losing the old desktop layout for a new layout that makes things easier to use.
As i have said previously i can do almost anything on my windows 8 metro interface that i was doing on windows 7, yes on the metro interface, it is just s new way of doing things, once people realize this and stop with the nonsense of Microsoft locking down the system maybe more people will rush to try it out.
Palpatine
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Palpatine,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/10/2013 | 7:55:26 AM
re: Windows Blue: What We Know
They are scared because MS boffins are trying to trade a full featured overlapping multi windows environment with a joke of GUI like Metro that in next Blue update will be barely capable of displaying non overlapped windows like Windows 2.0.
Going down from Windows 7 usability to Metro usability that is like Windows 1.0 (and in Blue hopefully will evolve up to Windows 2.0) is what is keeping Windows 8 Squarepants monthly user adoption HALF OF VISTA!
stretcherbearer
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stretcherbearer,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/30/2013 | 11:34:07 PM
re: Windows Blue: What We Know
I'm Not even a tech person, But from the point of view of an Indie Musician and artist, the whole win 8 shroud of whatever is extremely frustrating. I tried the pre-release versions, and was completely unimpressed. I have no interest in touch interfaces, until they improve the accuracy or something. I'll stick to analog or even a mouse for operating faders in DAWs. I'm stuck though, I need a new computer. I can't even begin to afford any Apple anything, and Although I like the Linux ethos, environment etc. Hardware support and music production apps are sorely lacking, for a non-coder, the inherent flexibility though is very cool. the customization is also another factor.. But for me I'm used to using a PC with a desktop, because all of the major Production apps, are oriented toward that setup, they wok even better when you have 2+desktops, it's the old analog console layout style. My point to Misanthroposoft is that You've gained a massive market share, from indie producers, and hobbyists. XP (which I'm Using right now) was the catalyst. iPad and touch to me seems a bit hokey for serious stuff for now, A recent console maker designed a digital console from the ground up, designing their own touch surface interfaces because the major producers couldn't produce one with accuracy that is necessary. I wonder if the trend in music studios and home based studios, being a hybrid of Analog and digital isn't a result of some of this stuff. The Manufacturers of Vacuum tubes, solid State components, germanium transistors are having a field day. and Us Musicians are loving it as well, being able to afford the equipment that The Beatles recorded on, now within reach. But The emphasis on touch and You're gonna use it or else,could be a detriment. I already see it as an obsticle in upgrading my studio and my fast aging equipment. Thank god that the manufacturers of Magnetic tape, have quadrupled their output and opened more factories, now we need to get the Open reel machine manufacturers back on board.
Tronist
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Tronist,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/1/2013 | 5:03:19 PM
re: Windows Blue: What We Know
If you're in the market for a new music computer, check out ADK Pro Audio. They build music PCs with Windows 7 (not 8) and the components they use are far superior to what Apple uses. You can even get them with your choice of DAW pre-loaded for free; just enter your registration info to activate. Oh yeah...they offer free lifetime phone support.
stretcherbearer
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stretcherbearer,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/2/2013 | 5:17:58 AM
re: Windows Blue: What We Know
Thanks For the tip! actually, I was on the phone web today and talked with an HP tech, via a link on the Cakewalk website, which also posted a link to ADK Pro that you're talking about. Definitely some interest there, still weighing the budget component type thing, but thankfully realized I had a lot more to work with than previously thought, so looking toward the future hardware wise and stuff, I think I might be set, but Again thanks a Million for the Idea, I'm gonna go back and take a little more in depth look. Cheers!
obiwan103
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obiwan103,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/31/2013 | 7:36:00 AM
re: Windows Blue: What We Know
Microsoft Windows 8 designers are ignoring what their *PAYING* customers are asking for - and that's a catastrophic mistake. If I'm going to have to learn a new OS from the ground up, I'm going to learn a free one. My next new computer will be Chrome, Droid, or Linux (most likely Linux). I will always prefer a well-organized drill-down menu or filestructure to the nonintuitive chaos of the windows 8 start screen.
SMP
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SMP,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/31/2013 | 2:34:48 PM
re: Windows Blue: What We Know
Microsoft is a monopoly - they think they can get away with it.
SMP
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SMP,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/31/2013 | 2:36:49 PM
re: Windows Blue: What We Know
It is looking more and more like Chromebooks and Macbooks are going to be the future. Apple, can we have a cheaper Macbook please?
dfoulger
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dfoulger,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/31/2013 | 5:07:03 PM
re: Windows Blue: What We Know
First, the desktop PC is far from dead. Tablets and laptops have their place, and I use both, but I use more desktop PC's than tablets or laptops and they tend to be more powerful (in terms of storage, processor, and memory), are more readily upgraded, and hence have longer useful lifetimes than the alternatives. While my use of multiples probably puts in a different class than many other users, there are still tens of millions of people who are multi-system users, and most of those multi-system users have at least one desktop in the mix.

Second, Microsoft is slowly making itself irrelevant. This new "modern desktop" probably ranks as the stupidest thing they've ever done, but it's not the first time they've tossed users out of the boat by making a radical change to their UI. I don't care if I never use the "modern desktop" on a serious basis. Microsoft says it is a leap forward. I say it's a step back to Windows 1 and the idiocy of tiling (and yes, I used that for a little while, but preferred the DOS command line. My 80 year old mother can barely manage the current Windows 7 user interface, in large part because it is so different than the XP user interface. It will be far easier to migrate her to a Mac, which will at least a be recognizable UI, or a Chromebook, which is really little more than a browser (all she uses now anyway) than it would be to upgrade her to the "modern desktop".

Consider it the first rule of computing: don't mess with the User Interface, especially if it works. Linux will be an easier to understand upgrade than Windows 8 for most users. Apple will be an easier to understand upgrade than Windows 8. And since MS has created the "modern desktop" to work on both tablets and desktops/laptops, it should be noted that iOS and Android are easier upgrades than Windows 8.

This isn't the death of the desktop PC, but it could well be the death of MIcrosoft as a provider of credible operating systems for desktops and laptops. They simply don't get it ... at all.

When they drop support for XP (the last usable version of Windows in my view), the systems will migrate to Linux. I'm done with Microsoft until they demonstrate that the most important word in PC is "personal".
Loerps
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Loerps,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/5/2013 | 9:42:26 PM
re: Windows Blue: What We Know
What in Win 8 can't be personalized?
fjackson385
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fjackson385,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/31/2013 | 6:57:35 PM
re: Windows Blue: What We Know
No more Windows for me. And I have zero interest in relying on a touchscreen for anything except opening an icon. I recently used a touchscreen for copy/paste and later for opening a small text size link and it was not a happy task. A touchscreen ought to be a supplimental input device to a laptop sized keyboard and touchpad. A "transformer" style laptop with a full keyboard/mouse/touchpad is the way forward for me.

I use Mint Linux 14 KDE and have mapped the keyboard for all the apps I use frequently and I think those are faster/easier than raising my hand/arm to tap the screen. I've been primarily a Linux user for years and fallback to Windows for the few specific apps I can't use in Linux - namely Solidworks, AutoCAD, and CNC software.
tigger2
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tigger2,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/1/2013 | 5:37:38 PM
re: Windows Blue: What We Know
As a SMB owner I have not heard one reason why I should switch to Windows 8. MSFT must own a lot of Apple stock, because it looks like MSFT wants my next set of machine purchases to run either some form of Linux or Apple O/S.
Mark532010
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Mark532010,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/1/2013 | 6:28:25 PM
re: Windows Blue: What We Know
While I am not as rabidly anti-metro as most of the posters, I will say that the current system is really difficult to use. That everything is so radically different in the two environments causes a lot of confusion.
My wife looks at my win8 pc and says "ugh, it looks so confusing" and while I believe that I could clean it up and configure it to the point where it was ok for her, the amount of work is more than its worth. I could download metro-apps of all the things she uses (email, facebook, netflix, etc.) but the first time she hits something she can no longer do in Metro (i.e. check dvd queue in netflix, connect to her pop3 mail acct, etc.) she will be frustrated and have to switch to desktop view where everything is different.

I understand that being older than 15 and not caring about sharing every trivial moment of our lives to twitter and facebook, we are no longer Microsofts primary concern, but the amount of work involved in getting her used to Metro is far more than it is worth. It will be interesting to see if Blue remedies some of that but I doubt it, since the OS now relies on apps for most of everything, we are at the mercy of the app developers and so far I have yet to see a Metro version of anything that has all the features of a desktop version - I understand creating a "most of the functions" version to hit the 90% but it seems like every time there is something not included that we use.
Palpatine
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Palpatine,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/2/2013 | 1:04:45 PM
re: Windows Blue: What We Know
Nailing the coffin of desktop PC would mean nailing the door for 90% of the user base and developers, that will face the choice between who back-stabbed them and competitors of that bast***.
The only tiny advantage of the ***ard would be legacy desktop compatibility, but the more Redmond marketing call it legacy the less palatable is the advantage.
What I see here is a clear hint for developers: let Win32 software root and keep selling it to the 90% of the market ignoring 8, and start developing for iOS and Andorid for new projects.
Or, you can work for WinRT competing with Win32 products that runs on 30 times more machines including W8 ones AND competing with iOS and Android that already have a wider audience and attracts more investors.
Whoever ruled MS business plan with Windows 8 has NO CLUE how IT market goes on.
trock835
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trock835,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/2/2013 | 3:17:00 PM
re: Windows Blue: What We Know
The arrogance of Microsoft continuing to shove Metro down our throats is becoming intolerable. It really puts us in a quandary as to how we proceed as an IT department. Our users hate, our management hates it, and I personally hate it. We don't dislike it we HATE it! Get it, Microsoft?

Using a third party product to simulate the Windows 7 interface isn't a solution. It introduces another set of variables that we need to validate with our applications and we would be betting our enterprise on a small company's product that probably won't be around in two years.
wht
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wht,
User Rank: Strategist
4/2/2013 | 5:06:23 PM
re: Windows Blue: What We Know
Get over it. Don't hate, adapt. It isn't that much different when you understand how it works. Put in a few hours or less, and you will find Win 8 works like you want it too in almost every case. Many things take less time and effort, so overall Win 8 is an improvement. Microsoft is not going to do what you want them to do, any more than Apple or Google will also. Being stubborn or closed minded will not help your company to move on with the rest of the industry.
Loerps
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Loerps,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/5/2013 | 8:53:59 PM
re: Windows Blue: What We Know
You don't need any 3rd party products to use Win 8, it works fine out of the box. The desktop is still there, you still click in the lower left corner of the desktop to get the start menu. In addition, there is a new power-user menu there. And you can add a toolbar in a few seconds that gives you the same list of installed programs in the same folder/file format that you got under the old start orb - except that it was two clicks then and is one click now. Outside of the start orb, the Win 8 desktop is essentially indistinguishable from the Win 7 desktop.



Really, the panic over Win 8 is hard to understand. It is actually a very good OS and will only get better.

proberts551
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proberts551,
User Rank: Strategist
4/2/2013 | 5:20:05 PM
re: Windows Blue: What We Know
"Get used to the Modern UI, like it or not."
OK Redmond, you have spoken...Good..Here is my answer, and I bet millions of home users will answer you as well. Microsoft is not the only OS in town. M.S. Better watch out for cloud computing, and terminal based solutions as well. After using Microsoft product since DOS 3.1, have made a career with Microsoft product since, I am bailing out. I will be installing Fedora, and will be finished with Microsoft product until it is once again consumer frendly, and based on what we as the home user wants, not some hair brained idea an over paid executive wants to shove down my mouse! No, you cannot do that, sorry, I am finished with you! I will also see what Apple has to offer before I jump to Linux. I will be forced to deal with your messy UI eventually at work, but they are also avoiding it like the Plague.
Loerps
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Loerps,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/5/2013 | 9:26:44 PM
re: Windows Blue: What We Know
In what Microsoft release have you seen the words "Get used to the Modern UI, like it or not"? I've seen them in blog posts by people who appear fanatical in their hatred for Win 8 or for MS, but I've never heard MS use them. Maybe I missed something.


I wouldn't expect the desktop to disappear any time soon. It's still there in Win 8 and it's nearly identical to the Win 7 desktop. On the other hand, touch and gestures are here to stay and it wouldn't be surprising to see this expanded over time. I would expect other OS's to go this same direction at some point. What grinds my gears is that if Apple had put a fully-functional OSx on a tablet that also ran an iPad-like iOS interface, they would have been hailed as innovative geniuses, with all the Applephiles singing halleluias and weepy-eyed with joy.



It's an unfortunate fact of life - some companies people love to love and some companies people love to hate.

mkorkowski
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mkorkowski,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/3/2013 | 12:42:27 PM
re: Windows Blue: What We Know
Look, I suppose many of us may adopt Windows 8 if there is nothing else but don't ever tell me like it or not, Microsoft. Who the hell are you? This is not just a tablet world. I understand new and updated UI for touch devices but the desktop isn't dead, and no we are all NOT going to go out and buy touchscreens. I'm not giving up my dual 24" monitors. So Microsoft YOU give me what I want or I'll go away. How about that?
Computer Repair Whiteplains NY
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Computer Repair Whiteplains NY,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/3/2013 | 3:33:04 PM
re: Windows Blue: What We Know
It seems that Windows Blue will contain the improvements about the Metro UI that were source of criticism among users.
TreeInMyCube
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TreeInMyCube,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/3/2013 | 5:02:33 PM
re: Windows Blue: What We Know
As I write this, it is still possible to buy Windows 7 systems from Dell and HP. It would be interesting to see whether Win7 sales are tailing off, or holding steady. My guess is that while techies like me (and the other commenters) may consider moving to Linux or getting a Chromebook, a lot of folks (like my parents) will just hang onto the Win7 system they have for a good while longer. Those folks who waited too long to give up their XP system (recession anyone?) will face an interesting choice.
flubaluba
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flubaluba,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/3/2013 | 6:48:53 PM
re: Windows Blue: What We Know
Just got a 4" huawei W1 and this is the future, seriously simple to setup and to use, i actually feel like it is almost too simple compared to android , it feels like i am missing steps when i want to do something, but i am not i am just not having to go through so many steps to do things.
I don't know why people even bother talking about android and the fight for marketshare, windows8 phone has already won the battle in my opinion and i am sure in the opinion of most who try it.
Number 6
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Number 6,
User Rank: Moderator
4/4/2013 | 7:28:10 PM
re: Windows Blue: What We Know
I love all these comments. If Microsoft listened to us, we'd still be using the same GUI as Windows 3.1... or DOS.

Yeah, I loved knowing exactly where my files were and making the prompt show which directory I was in so I didn't get lost after a cd command.

I don't need any of them new-fangled "windows". I only use one program at a time anyway. And that's a PROGRAM, you whippersnappers, not an application or an app, and it was written by a PROGRAMMER, not a software engineer.

And what's with all these colors? I only need green (or amber!) on black. No need for WYSIWYG either. I can get a point across in monospaced characters without bold or italics.

In fact, I'd much rather go back to that ASR-33 with its continuous roll of paper. Who needs lower case anyway? If I need lower case, I'll use my typewriter.

Insert a few smileys here. Oh, wait, we didn't have those "emoticons" either.

Seriously, though (and I hope you enjoyed that walk down memory lane), I agree that changing a GUI is risky and disruptive, particularly if there's no clear benefit for doing so. I dred teaching my spouse and parents how to use any new GUI after it took years for them to get comfortable with the current one. But at the same time, we don't make any progress by standing still. Don't we all work in a field that moves faster than most?
iansdigby
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iansdigby,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/5/2013 | 11:23:55 AM
re: Windows Blue: What We Know
Can anyone please enlighten me? I must be missing something about Modern UI vs Desktop. The Modern UI does not appear to allow display of multiple apps in resizable windows on screen - a fundamental feature of Windows for the working professional. Without the ability to view multiple apps on screen, cut/paste between and resize windows etc., the Modern UI, stripped of the desktop, would be more properly named Window (singular). It would be a big, big step backwards. Who are the worldwide base of Office users (MS's biggest PC money-spinner)? why, office staff of course, at all levels. And most of them need multiple windowing on a desktop. I actually like the Modern thing more than iOS as a touch interface and think MS has got it right combining the two. Modern as a glorified and touch-enabled Start Menu is a great idea. But the desktop must be an integral part of Windows 8 and any future releases.
Loerps
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Loerps,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/5/2013 | 8:42:51 PM
re: Windows Blue: What We Know
I wouldn't expect the desktop to go away for some time to come yet, and not until the capabilities you outline are available in the new interface. Touch and gestures are the wave of the future. While the gesture a lot of folks associate with win 8 right now is a single finger pointed heavenward, keep in mind the there will always be resistance to change.



BTW, I happen to really like Win 8. It will be interesting to see how it evolves.

KaelooGang
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KaelooGang,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/14/2013 | 1:42:45 PM
re: Windows Blue: What We Know
If its just an Update *A big update* I hope we don't have to pay anything?
I want Windows in a way to become more Customizable, but not too much so you can change everything, but just so we can do a bit more, like have more Start Screen Designs, colours and other things. I can Imagine them removing the Desktop, but they would have to produce something more amazing than it. Like... a cork board or something? They also better be careful because if they lose Windows' business, then Microsoft will too. I don't like using apps/tiles that much, because I think they can be improved a bit more and have many more features like, they always are... so.. boring and dull? They should focus on Voice Recognition more, because if they want to keep up, then... Like for example you could say "Windows Listen" and then you could say "Any recipes with chocolate in them for my Bake sale?" or "What homework do I have to complete", it would also Introduce the Microsoft Future Vision thing.
Rydangel Blessed
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Rydangel Blessed,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/26/2013 | 3:51:40 AM
re: Windows Blue: What We Know
i was searching for windows 7software so i can finally update my windows xp desktop, and all i see our windows 8 which seems to get bad reviews. now i see they are going to yet another new system with blue. microsoft is going to force me into learning mac or linux. i like new tech. i have a windows 7 laptop and an android jellybean tablet, both of which i love. but the bulk of all my files are on my desktop. I DON'T WANT TO LEARN A NEW UI!! I HATE MY TABLET'S TOUCHSCREEN! if it ain't broke don't fix it. i just got my momma using windows7, she can barely use her iphone and kindle fire. if desktops go to touchscreen, she'll be lost. and forget my 85 yo grandma using it. do they have linux for dummies? now i have to get the 15yo nephew to teach me how to use his mac. ><
Odis Lee
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Odis Lee,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/1/2013 | 8:15:11 PM
re: Windows Blue: What We Know
I tried Win8 and couldn't stand the modern UI and ended up setting it up as much like a traditional desktop UI as I could. You shouldn't have to use a third party program to make it comfortable to use.
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