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Worldwide E-Learning To Draw Nearly $53 Billion By 2010

E-learning has emerged as the second most popular method for organizational teaching, in terms of hours spent, and is quickly increasing in use.

The world market for e-learning is expected to exceed $52.6 billion by 2010, according to a new report by Global Industry Analysts.

Rapid changes in training and the workforce means that information and communication technologies will increase their role dramatically in terms of teaching and learning, while pressures to stay competitive drive companies to increasingly focus on the latest technologies, including e-learning, according to the report.

E-learning has emerged as the second most popular method for organizational teaching, in terms of hours spent, and is quickly increasing in use among primary, secondary and higher education centers.

The choice of learning systems is growing, but broader choice from a greater number of offerings and content, service, and technology providers have produced obstacles to interoperability, according to Global Industry Analysts.

The United States is the largest e-learning market globally and revenues here are expected to surpass $17.5 billion in 2007, according to the report. Europe and Japan offer prospects for growth, but they lag behind because of smaller markets.

Globalization could drive faster adoption in Asian market, which experts predict will register an average annual growth rate ranging between 25% and 30% through 2010.

The overall e-learning market at the global and regional levels is expected to grow at rates ranging between 15% and 30%. The US retains its dominance in the corporate eLearning market with a share of over 60%. Europe is the second largest market with a share of less than 15%.

The complete report, available for under $4,000, provides projections for each region of the world through 2010 and profiles 298 global e-earning vendors.

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