Cloud // Cloud Storage
News
7/29/2010
05:36 PM
Connect Directly
LinkedIn
Twitter
Google+
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

YouTube Promises 15 Minutes Of Fame

To mark an increase in allowable running time for non-partner videos, YouTube says it will promote a handful of video makers.

If it seems like YouTube videos are getting longer, you may be watching a particularly dull bit of filmmaking. Or it may be that the video actually is longer.

YouTube on Thursday said that it is now allowing content creators to upload videos with running times in excess of 10 minutes.

The new limit is 15 minutes, an increase that reflects audiences' growing affinity for longer form content online.

YouTube content partners have been able to publish longer videos for years, but for those not in the YouTube Partner Program, a 50% increase in allowable running time is significant.

To promote the occasion, YouTube is encouraging users to make "a video of your '15 minutes of fame.'"

YouTube product manager Joshua Siegel advises imagining this video as an attempt to communicate what you'd want the world to know about you.

To be considered, YouTube videographers should tag their submissions "yt15minutes" and upload them by Wednesday, August 4.

"We'll select a handful of people to truly gain their 15 minutes of fame by featuring them on the YouTube homepage in a future spotlight," Siegel wrote in a blog post.

YouTube's willingness to handle longer videos comes a result of growing confidence in its tools for detecting unauthorized usage of copyrighted material, such as its Content ID system.

"Because of the success of these ongoing technological efforts, we are able to increase the upload limit today," wrote Siegel.

The decision by a judge last month to throw out Viacom's $1 billion lawsuit against Google and YouTube for alleged copyright infringement may also have contributed to YouTube's willingness to host longer clips.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Google in the Enterprise Survey
Google in the Enterprise Survey
There's no doubt Google has made headway into businesses: Just 28 percent discourage or ban use of its productivity ­products, and 69 percent cite Google Apps' good or excellent ­mobility. But progress could still stall: 59 percent of nonusers ­distrust the security of Google's cloud. Its data privacy is an open question, and 37 percent worry about integration.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Tech Digest - August 27, 2014
Who wins in cloud price wars? Short answer: not IT. Enterprises don't want bare-bones IaaS. Providers must focus on support, not undercutting rivals.
Flash Poll
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Archived InformationWeek Radio
Howard Marks talks about steps to take in choosing the right cloud storage solutions for your IT problems
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.