At DEMO, The Pen Is Mightier Than The Cord - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
Mobile // Mobile Applications
Commentary
1/29/2008
09:16 PM
Richard Martin
Richard Martin
Commentary
50%
50%

At DEMO, The Pen Is Mightier Than The Cord

Like many people, I tend to zone out when I hear the phrase "pen-based computing." Plenty of variations on the concept have been tried, including the LeapFrog Fly, which was aimed at the "tween" market. But when Livescribe showed off its latest version at Demo this afternoon, I was impressed.

Like many people, I tend to zone out when I hear the phrase "pen-based computing." Plenty of variations on the concept have been tried, including the LeapFrog Fly, which was aimed at the "tween" market. But when Livescribe showed off its latest version at Demo this afternoon, I was impressed.Founded earlier this year by the indefatigable Jim Marggraff, one of the inventors of "paper-based" (or pen-based, depending on how you want to look at it) computing and a former executive with LeapFrog, Livescribe is attempting to prove that there's a niche for a "Montblanc-sized" computer that can write, record, and play back handwriting. Providing an interface between your desktop PC and your paper notebook, the Livescribe Pulse combines the ease and spontaneity of handwritten notes and sketches with the power of storage and playback.

The Pulse requires microdot-printed paper that can be purchased in notebook form for about five bucks (Marggraff told me he's also going to provide a printable form of the specialized sheets that will be free). Once you write on the paper you can do just about anything with that content, including record whatever was being said while you were writing. The computer will automatically store a copy of the written words or images and upload it to your desktop. The "smartpen" will even translate automatically into Spanish, Mandarin, or Arabic.

Marggraff thinks the Pulse will be especially attractive to students, adding that it will appeal to "anyone who writes notes on paper."

The company motto is "Never miss a word." "Anything you hear, write, or speak can be captured and shared, forever," adds Marggraff.

I can think of situations where I would have loved to have one of these - while covering the skirmishes along the border between Thailand and Cambodia in the late 1980s, for instance. Combining handwriting with computing and connectivity is a fertile idea, and the Pulse smartpen will sell for $199 for a 2-gig version. Marggraff has been pushing pen-based computing for some time now, and I'm not convinced there's a real market for this tool right now. But it's a mighty impressive little piece of technology.

We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Slideshows
IT Careers: Top 10 US Cities for Tech Jobs
Cynthia Harvey, Freelance Journalist, InformationWeek,  1/14/2020
Commentary
Predictions for Cloud Computing in 2020
James Kobielus, Research Director, Futurum,  1/9/2020
News
What's Next: AI and Data Trends for 2020 and Beyond
Jessica Davis, Senior Editor, Enterprise Apps,  12/30/2019
White Papers
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
Video
Current Issue
The Cloud Gets Ready for the 20's
This IT Trend Report explores how cloud computing is being shaped for the next phase in its maturation. It will help enterprise IT decision makers and business leaders understand some of the key trends reflected emerging cloud concepts and technologies, and in enterprise cloud usage patterns. Get it today!
Slideshows
Flash Poll