Bank Drops Google Suit Over Errant Gmail - InformationWeek

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9/29/2009
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Bank Drops Google Suit Over Errant Gmail

After obtaining information about the Gmail account holder who accidentally received confidential information, Rocky Mountain Bank and Google have agreed to end the bank's lawsuit.

A bank that sued Google after an employee mistakenly e-mailed confidential data to the wrong Gmail address has agreed to the dismissal of its case after Google provided the bank with information about the Gmail account holder.

Rocky Mountain Bank and Google filed a joint motion on Monday to dismiss the temporary restraining order (TRO) obtained by the bank and resolve the case.

"We're pleased the court granted our motion to dismiss the case and allow us to reactivate the user's account," a Google spokesperson said in an e-mailed statement.

Rocky Mountain Bank filed its lawsuit to compel Google to provide information about the Gmail account holder who accidentally received the bank's confidential data -- names, addresses, tax identification numbers, and loan information for 1,325 individual and business accounts.

Google initially refused to provide the information because the bank sought the information without formal legal process.

Rocky Mountain Bank EVP and counsel Tina Martinez did not return a call seeking comment about whether further legal action would be taken against the Gmail user who accidentally received the bank's confidential data, now that the account holder has been identified.

The bank's TRO demanded that Google and the account holder be enjoined from distributing the bank's information, that Google deactivate the account, that Google delete the inadvertently sent e-mail and the attached data file, that Google disclose whether the account is active or dormant, and that Google disclose information about the account holder if the account is active.

The extent of Google's compliance and the disposition of the account remains unclear because a document detailing the steps the company took has not been made available through Pacer.gov, the online court document database for the US.

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