Google's Android To Offer Up App Store? - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
Mobile // Mobile Applications
Commentary
5/30/2008
12:10 PM
Eric Ogren
Eric Ogren
Commentary
50%
50%

Google's Android To Offer Up App Store?

Another gem to come from Google's I/O conference is news that Android-powered phones will be able to access some sort of centralized store to find and download applications to the handset. This will be great for developers looking to distribute their applications, as well as users seeking new functionality for their phones.

Another gem to come from Google's I/O conference is news that Android-powered phones will be able to access some sort of centralized store to find and download applications to the handset. This will be great for developers looking to distribute their applications, as well as users seeking new functionality for their phones.Andy Rubin, the Android project leader for Google, didn't confirm the existence of an Android Store definitely, but he came close enough. The Register quotes him as saying, "It would be a great benefit to the Android community to provide a place where people can go to safely and securely download content and where a billing system would allow developers to get paid for their effort. We wouldn't have done our job if we didn't provide something that helps developers get distribution." During demonstrations, a button labeled "market" was visible on some Android screens, so it is possible that work on an application store is already well under way.

As a new market entrant, Android is going to need all the help it can get to spur adoption. One of the biggest issues facing the mobile industry is the discovery process of finding new content and applications for phones. Network operators have attempted to combat this with centralized stores where content can be purchased (think Verizon Wireless' Get It Now).

If Android phones can have access to a store where applications can easily be found, this will be a big boost for the platform. It will take away some of the fear that early adopters might feel about switching to the unproven operating system.

But Rubin made other comments that are noteworthy. The very nature of Android's open model and Apache license means that OEMs, software developers, and even network operators can tweak the APIs of the Android handset and vastly change the functionality of the phone. "They can add to it. They can remove from it. They make it their own. They can rip out all the Google stuff and put in all Yahoo stuff."

Herein lies what is perhaps Android's greatest strength and greatest weakness.

We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Slideshows
IT Careers: 12 Job Skills in Demand for 2020
Cynthia Harvey, Freelance Journalist, InformationWeek,  10/1/2019
Commentary
Enterprise Guide to Multi-Cloud Adoption
Cathleen Gagne, Managing Editor, InformationWeek,  9/27/2019
Commentary
5 Ways CIOs Can Better Compete to Recruit Top Tech Talent
Guest Commentary, Guest Commentary,  10/2/2019
White Papers
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
Video
Current Issue
Data Science and AI in the Fast Lane
This IT Trend Report will help you gain insight into how quickly and dramatically data science is influencing how enterprises are managed and where they will derive business success. Read the report today!
Slideshows
Flash Poll