IT Managers Appear To Be Everywhere - InformationWeek
IoT
IoT
Mobile // Mobile Applications
Commentary
8/29/2006
11:45 AM
Commentary
Commentary
Commentary
50%
50%
RELATED EVENTS
Ransomware: Latest Developments & How to Defend Against Them
Nov 01, 2017
Ransomware is one of the fastest growing types of malware, and new breeds that escalate quickly ar ...Read More>>

IT Managers Appear To Be Everywhere

Look around your IT department. Doesn't it seem that every other person is a manager? That feeling isn't too far-fetched. The number of IT managers in recent years is way up. In mid-2006, the government classified 390,000 IT professionals in the United States as managers, up 119,000, or 44%, from mid-2001.

Look around your IT department. Doesn't it seem that every other person is a manager? That feeling isn't too far-fetched. The number of IT managers in recent years is way up. In mid-2006, the government classified 390,000 IT professionals in the United States as managers, up 119,000, or 44%, from mid-2001.At midyear, 11.2% of employed U.S. IT pros were managers, up from 7.8% in mid-2001, according to an InformationWeek analysis of U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data.

Why the shift? I have a few theories:

* The reliance on packaged software and offshore outsourcing means there's less of a need for companies to employ programmers and systems analysts, but the need to coordinate the use of packaged wares within an organization requires supervision.

* The Internet changed how we deal with business partners, whether contracted outsourcers, vendors and suppliers on the supply chain, or joint-venture partners. Tech-savvy pros are needed to help manage those relationships.

* IT is woven into the fabric of every inch of the enterprise, and an IT manager is needed to help coordinate the collaboration among a company's units. An example of this: The use of IT-knowledgeable project managers is on the rise.

* Certain IT skills are rare, and those holding them demand big bucks. In some companies, top pay goes only to managers. Some highly skilled IT staffers, with no supervisory responsibility, are designated managers to get the high salary.

What do you think? Are there other reasons for the growth in IT managers?

Also, are you one of these new IT managers? If so, I'd like to hear from you. I'm writing a story explaining this trend in new managers and am looking for people to be profiled in the story.

E-mail me at echabrow@cmp.com.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
How Enterprises Are Attacking the IT Security Enterprise
How Enterprises Are Attacking the IT Security Enterprise
To learn more about what organizations are doing to tackle attacks and threats we surveyed a group of 300 IT and infosec professionals to find out what their biggest IT security challenges are and what they're doing to defend against today's threats. Download the report to see what they're saying.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
2017 State of IT Report
In today's technology-driven world, "innovation" has become a basic expectation. IT leaders are tasked with making technical magic, improving customer experience, and boosting the bottom line -- yet often without any increase to the IT budget. How are organizations striking the balance between new initiatives and cost control? Download our report to learn about the biggest challenges and how savvy IT executives are overcoming them.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.
Flash Poll