Microsoft CEO Says 'Nobody Gets' Yahoo Deal - InformationWeek
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Microsoft CEO Says 'Nobody Gets' Yahoo Deal

Steve Ballmer says he was surprised by the market's reaction to the search and advertising partnership but also characterized the deal as "a little bit complicated."

Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer told investors Thursday that he was surprised by the mixed stock market reaction to the search and advertising partnership Microsoft announced with Yahoo Wednesday, and argued that people don't understand the deal's implications.

"Taking questions over the last 18 months, including yesterday, and walking through the deal and watching the market reaction, nobody gets it," he said at the company's annual Financial Analyst Meeting at Microsoft headquarters in Redmond, Wash. "I know some people were sort of frothy in the market. I was surprised by the market reaction."

Ballmer did admit, however, that both the deal and future benefits to both Yahoo and Microsoft are "a little bit complicated."

Microsoft's partnership with Yahoo, which is subject to regulatory review and not expected to be fully in place before sometime next year, would make Microsoft's Bing the search engine for Yahoo's sites while making Yahoo a primary sales partner for Bing. The two companies would share search revenue over the life of the deal.

The key to the deal, Ballmer said, will be increased scale and market share. Combining Microsoft's search and advertising scale with that of Yahoo, he said, will be a "tool for product improvement." The more searches a search engine sees, the more relevant the results as algorithms get tweaked.

Similarly, the more searches the search engine sees, the more and better the information that the search engine provider can give to advertisers. As the search engine improves, Ballmer predicted, the combined Microsoft-Yahoo could grow market share even further.

Ballmer said that the reason people were confused by the economics of the deal is likely due the fact that there was, in the end, no acquisition, and no up-front exchange of money. "Nothing got bought, nothing got sold, but the partnership in and of itself creates economic value," he said. "It creates an immediate opportunity for synergy." Yahoo, for example, expects its operating income to increase by up to $500 million after the partnership gets implemented and cut capital expenses by $200 million.

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