12 Ways AI Will Disrupt Your C-Suite - InformationWeek

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5/18/2016
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Lisa Morgan
Lisa Morgan
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12 Ways AI Will Disrupt Your C-Suite

McKinsey & Company estimates that as much as 45% of the tasks currently performed by people can be automated using existing technologies. If you haven't made an effort to understand how artificial intelligence will affect your company, now is the time to start.
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First-Mover Advantage 

The seeds of what some are calling The Exponential Age were planted long ago, manifesting themselves as exponential increases in processing power, storage capacity, bandwidth utilization, and -- as a result of all of that -- digital information. The same rule applies to machine learning.     
'True AI learns at an exponential rate, evolves and sometimes even rewrites better versions of itself,' said Walter O'Brien, founder and CEO of Scorpion Computer Services, in an interview. 'Because of this factor, the first company to market can also be the first to gather the most training data material -- for example, Google's Voice recognition on cell phones. The lessons learned can be encoded as heuristics or subtle guidelines which become the IP of the company -- for example, the definition of Google's relevance scores. This all creates a barrier to competition.'
Imagine cramming 250 years of human thinking into 90 minutes. Scorpion Computer Services' AI platform does that.
(Image: skeeze via Pixabay)

First-Mover Advantage

The seeds of what some are calling The Exponential Age were planted long ago, manifesting themselves as exponential increases in processing power, storage capacity, bandwidth utilization, and -- as a result of all of that -- digital information. The same rule applies to machine learning.

"True AI learns at an exponential rate, evolves and sometimes even rewrites better versions of itself," said Walter O'Brien, founder and CEO of Scorpion Computer Services, in an interview. "Because of this factor, the first company to market can also be the first to gather the most training data material -- for example, Google's Voice recognition on cell phones. The lessons learned can be encoded as heuristics or subtle guidelines which become the IP of the company -- for example, the definition of Google's relevance scores. This all creates a barrier to competition."

Imagine cramming 250 years of human thinking into 90 minutes. Scorpion Computer Services' AI platform does that.

(Image: skeeze via Pixabay)

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