8 Ways To Secure Data During US-EU Privacy Fight - InformationWeek

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2/15/2016
08:05 AM
Lisa Morgan
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8 Ways To Secure Data During US-EU Privacy Fight

After months of legal uncertainty over transatlantic data flows, the European Commission and the US have agreed on a new framework called the EU-US Privacy Shield. But because no text is available yet, there's no way to interpret it. Here's what organizations need to know now.
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Do Not Rely On The Safe Harbor Framework 

Data transfers complying with Safe Harbor framework are now unlawful. While it may be true that there isn't a lot of policing happening, especially of SMEs, some countries are paying closer attention than others.

'Liability depends on where companies have offices and assets, [and] how much data they're transferring. If you're transferring data from Germany you may be at more risk than transferring data from the UK,' said Chiara Portner, an IAPP-certified partner at Paradigm Counsel, in an interview. 'I don't see authorities going after very small companies that might not be transferring lots of data. They're probably looking at Facebook or Google to make them a poster child.'

Different countries are imposing different fines. Rather than proceeding blindly, some organizations are weighing the risks of liability against the benefits of data transfers that may be considered illegal. Others are adopting Standard Contractual Clauses. 

(Image: WikiImages via Pixabay)

Do Not Rely On The Safe Harbor Framework

Data transfers complying with Safe Harbor framework are now unlawful. While it may be true that there isn't a lot of policing happening, especially of SMEs, some countries are paying closer attention than others.

"Liability depends on where companies have offices and assets, [and] how much data they're transferring. If you're transferring data from Germany you may be at more risk than transferring data from the UK," said Chiara Portner, an IAPP-certified partner at Paradigm Counsel, in an interview. "I don't see authorities going after very small companies that might not be transferring lots of data. They're probably looking at Facebook or Google to make them a poster child."

Different countries are imposing different fines. Rather than proceeding blindly, some organizations are weighing the risks of liability against the benefits of data transfers that may be considered illegal. Others are adopting Standard Contractual Clauses.

(Image: WikiImages via Pixabay)

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