10 Best Tech Companies To Work For In 2016 - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
Data Management // Big Data Analytics
News
12/30/2015
07:06 AM
Dawn Kawamoto
Dawn Kawamoto
Slideshows
50%
50%

10 Best Tech Companies To Work For In 2016

Google slipped off its perch as the No. 1 place to work on Glassdoor's Best Places to Work list, unseated by an Internet travel company. Here's a look at 10 top tech companies where you may want to hang your hat in the new year.
Previous
1 of 11
Next

(Image: Brenda Gottsabend via Flickr)

(Image: Brenda Gottsabend via Flickr)

As the year prepares to close out and New Year's resolutions get made for 2016, it may be time to ditch the Dilbert cubicle life and land a new job. Travel site Airbnb, rather than Google, may be one of the first places you may want to look, according to the 50 Best Places to Work in 2016 list released by Glassdoor.

This year marked the first time that Airbnb made it onto Glassdoor's list and, when it did, it secured the No. 1 spot. Meanwhile, Google, which ranked No. 1 last year, stumbled, but still remains in the top 10.

Companies are ranked based on voluntary, anonymous reviews given by current and former employees, who weigh in on such areas as overall employee satisfaction, compensation and benefits, career opportunities, work-life balance, culture and values, and quality of senior management. The companies are then ranked on a scale of 1 to 5, with the highest number ranked at "very satisfied." Although the average overall employer rating on Glassdoor is 3.3, companies making the Best Places to Work in 2016 list needed to have a rating of at least 3.51, and meet other criteria.

Of the 50 companies that make up Glassdoor's Best Places to Work in 2016 list, tech companies captured 21 of the spots.

[See 8 Hot Tech Jobs Getting Big Salary Bumps in 2016.]

"Tech has always had a strong presence on the list and is the most represented industry in the top 50," said Scott Dobroski, a Glassdoor spokesman, who noted that 14 tech companies made it to last year's list.

Two factors drive the prevalence of tech companies on the list. One factor that contributes is the fierce fight to attract tech talent like engineers, software developers, data scientists, and the like, said Dobroski. Secondly, tech companies not only heavily invest in their employees in terms of compensation, but they also offer lavish perks and benefits to workers.

Perks and benefits are one of the four areas that employees frequently cite when giving company reviews on Glassdoor, he said. Other areas frequently mentioned, which can also raise or lower a company's ranking, include compensation offered, career opportunities, and whether there is a mission-driven culture.

In tech, it's especially common to find a mission-driven culture. After all, it's an industry where it's not uncommon to find engineers and developers sleeping under their desks, rather than heading home, as they prepare to launch a product.

On the following pages, take a look at Glassdoor's 10 best tech companies to work for, based on overall company rating and other metrics listed in its methodology.

**Elite 100 2016: DEADLINE EXTENDED TO JAN. 15, 2016** There's still time to be a part of the prestigious InformationWeek Elite 100! Submit your company's application by Jan. 15, 2016. You'll find instructions and a submission form here: InformationWeek's Elite 100 2016.

Dawn Kawamoto is an Associate Editor for Dark Reading, where she covers cybersecurity news and trends. She is an award-winning journalist who has written and edited technology, management, leadership, career, finance, and innovation stories for such publications as CNET's ... View Full Bio

We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Previous
1 of 11
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
<<   <   Page 2 / 3   >   >>
SunitaT0
50%
50%
SunitaT0,
User Rank: Ninja
12/31/2015 | 3:08:17 PM
Re: Trickle down
@shamika I think promoting a "healthy" learning culture needs the employees to take breaks so that they can absorb it all in.
SunitaT0
50%
50%
SunitaT0,
User Rank: Ninja
12/31/2015 | 3:06:09 PM
Re: Trickle down
@jries. Most It officials quit their jobs by 35-40. I have quit 3 of the best jobs in my career and settled for a job with a 20% lesser median salary. The upside is that the work culture is amazing. Did I mention we have a little sports complex in our building? Our all-time favorite is the human bubble football.
SunitaT0
50%
50%
SunitaT0,
User Rank: Ninja
12/31/2015 | 3:01:57 PM
Re: Opportunity and inclusion
@Shamika: from my experience most IT companies don't have good work culture. Only some selected have. Money is not everything. Peace of mind is also a big factor.
SunitaT0
50%
50%
SunitaT0,
User Rank: Ninja
12/31/2015 | 2:59:37 PM
Re: Opportunity and inclusion
@stratustician: I agree. Without a significant pay bump it's really hard to leave a job with a really nice work culture. I remember we had a puppy cuddling room to relieve stress. We took this idea of the internet and incorporated in our corporate.
Stratustician
50%
50%
Stratustician,
User Rank: Ninja
12/31/2015 | 12:59:20 PM
Re: Opportunity and inclusion
I agree.  I work for one of the top 50 Canadian companies rated by Glassdoor, and honestly, the culture is great.  Not only do they have flexible working arrangements which helps with employee happiness, it's often the little things that make the difference.  While we don't have the luxury of all-out ".COM" benefits, having dogs at work, the monthly beer social, means better synergy between teams and less disgruntled employees.  Coming from some horrible cultures, it's nice to see companies actually take a vested interest in keeping employees happy. it's win-win, employees tend to stick around longer because it's harder to want to leave a good corporate culture, and happy workers are productive workers.
progman2000
100%
0%
progman2000,
User Rank: Ninja
12/31/2015 | 10:29:20 AM
Re: Trickle down
I wish I could remember what life was like around 30...
jries921
50%
50%
jries921,
User Rank: Ninja
12/31/2015 | 10:18:51 AM
Re: Trickle down
That gets very old by the time one is 30, probably has a spouse and children, and even if he doesn't, probably has a life outside of work (or wants one of the above).

People weren't meant to be monks (even in very luxurious monasteries) and those inclined to be such will tend to make the sacrifice for causes deemed significantly more important than the Almighty Dollar.

 
progman2000
50%
50%
progman2000,
User Rank: Ninja
12/31/2015 | 9:58:23 AM
Re: Opportunity and inclusion
IT companies and companies in general anymore. I interviewed a company where a friend works ten years ago and they were hesitant to give me an offer because I would have needed to work remote. Now I know that 50% of that company's staff are remote employees (thankfully I turned their offer down, I didn't want to be on the beginning of that learning curve for them).
progman2000
50%
50%
progman2000,
User Rank: Ninja
12/31/2015 | 9:56:23 AM
Re: Trickle down
Yep - and the "work as life" has always been the rule more than the exception at most of the companies I've ever worked for. I'd love to see a job in NYC where this isn't the case.
Broadway0474
50%
50%
Broadway0474,
User Rank: Ninja
12/31/2015 | 9:38:04 AM
Re: Trickle down
Right, Whoopty, what's unlimited vacation time do you if you are peer pressured into not wanting to ever use any --- or to working and sleeping in the office 20 hours a day? I suppose people who want a life should avoid companies whose culture attracts people for whom work is life.
<<   <   Page 2 / 3   >   >>
Commentary
What Becomes of CFOs During Digital Transformation?
Joao-Pierre S. Ruth, Senior Writer,  2/4/2020
News
Fighting the Coronavirus with Analytics and GIS
Jessica Davis, Senior Editor, Enterprise Apps,  2/3/2020
Slideshows
IT Careers: 10 Job Skills in High Demand This Year
Cynthia Harvey, Freelance Journalist, InformationWeek,  2/3/2020
White Papers
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
Video
Current Issue
IT Careers: Tech Drives Constant Change
Advances in information technology and management concepts mean that IT professionals must update their skill sets, even their career goals on an almost yearly basis. In this IT Trend Report, experts share advice on how IT pros can keep up with this every-changing job market. Read it today!
Slideshows
Flash Poll