6 Characteristics Of Data-Driven Rock Stars - InformationWeek
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5/21/2015
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Lisa Morgan
Lisa Morgan
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6 Characteristics Of Data-Driven Rock Stars

Learn what traits to look for in data-savvy movers and shakers, from data scientists and business analysts to executives, managers, and even employees.
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(Image: bykst via Pixabay)

(Image: bykst via Pixabay)

Data is being used in and across more functional aspects of today's organizations. Wringing the most business value out of the data requires a mix of roles that may include data scientists, business analysts, data analysts, IT, and line-of-business titles. As a result, more resumes and job descriptions include data-related skills.

A recent survey by technology career site Dice revealed that nine of the top 10 highest-paying IT jobs require big data skills. On the Dice site, searches and job postings including big data skills have increased 39% year-over-year, according to Dice president Shravan Goli. Some of the top-compensated skills include big data, data scientist, data architect, Hadoop, HBase, MapReduce, and Pig -- and the pay range for those skills ranges from more than $116,000 to more than $127,000, according to data Dice provided to InformationWeek.

However, the gratuitous use of such terms can cloud the main issue, which is whether the candidate and the company can turn that data into specific, favorable outcomes -- whether that's increasing the ROI of a pay-per-click advertising campaign or building a more accurate recommendation engine.

If data skills are becoming necessary for more roles in an organization, it follows that not all data-driven rock stars are data scientists. Although data scientists are considered the black belts, it is possible for other roles to distinguish themselves based on their superior understanding and application of data. Regardless of a person's title or position in an organization, there are some traits common to data-driven rock stars that have more to do with attitudes and behaviors than technologies, tools, and methods. Click through for six of them.

Lisa Morgan is a freelance writer who covers big data and BI for InformationWeek. She has contributed articles, reports, and other types of content to various publications and sites ranging from SD Times to the Economist Intelligent Unit. Frequent areas of coverage include ... View Full Bio

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shakeeb
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shakeeb,
User Rank: Ninja
5/31/2015 | 9:10:59 PM
Knowledge is power
Data scientist should be knowledgeable on different tool and techniques that use to analysis data. At the same time it is also important to provide them with training to increase their skills.
shakeeb
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shakeeb,
User Rank: Ninja
5/31/2015 | 9:10:24 PM
Flexibility
Data scientist need to be flexible enough to work with many people.  They need to work closely with people in understanding data.
shakeeb
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shakeeb,
User Rank: Ninja
5/31/2015 | 9:02:12 PM
Re: Item seven
"Data-driven rock stars are genuinely curious" this is a very true statement.  Without this quality they will not be able explore the gravity of data.
shakeeb
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shakeeb,
User Rank: Ninja
5/31/2015 | 8:58:54 PM
Re: Item seven
I agree. Accepting challenge is an important. Further it will help you to be more active and innovative at workplace.
shakeeb
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shakeeb,
User Rank: Ninja
5/31/2015 | 8:54:26 PM
Importance of data.
It is important to understand the data. At the same time it is also important to understand the data source. Knowing the data source will help them to know the data better.
asksqn
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asksqn,
User Rank: Ninja
5/30/2015 | 2:30:41 PM
Data-Driven Buzzword Trendiness
I am underimpressed and underwhelmed with data-driven anything, particularly as it concerns the use of the current buzzword, "data scientist."  No one employed outside of the industry of making money on buzzword certifications even knows what a data scientist is.  Further, all the allegedly big salaried jobs found on Dice are more interested in hiring H1B Visas rather than Americans for US based positions.  In the final analysis, "big data/data-driven" are just trendy buzzwords to prop up the worthless tech certification industry.
jries921
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jries921,
User Rank: Ninja
5/29/2015 | 11:43:55 PM
Re: Item seven
I think money is a motivation to do the job adequately, but it may actually be a disincentive to excellence, as the latter frequently requires experimentation (inherently risky)  and may not result in enough of an increase in income to be deemed worth the effort.  Indeed, in a workplace that values conformity and obedience more than excellence, striving for the latter might even result in less money.

 
Broadway0474
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Broadway0474,
User Rank: Ninja
5/29/2015 | 11:18:11 PM
Re: Item seven
I think profit motive no longer motivates for professionals after they've made enough profits. For everybody else, that still does nicely.
jries921
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jries921,
User Rank: Ninja
5/29/2015 | 12:52:41 PM
Re: Item seven
"Passion" was someone else's word (I didn't use it).  My point was that it's hard to be really good at something you don't like doing (largely because you're highly unlikely to devote the time and effort required to achieve excellence) and I suspect strongly that it is nearly impossible to achieve "rock star" status, unless you do.

A sense of duty is valuable in achieving excellence (which is why there have been great generals who really didn't like war; though more than a few did), but the profit motive really isn't (except, perhaps, in purely financial concerns, like investment or banking).

 
Broadway0474
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Broadway0474,
User Rank: Ninja
5/28/2015 | 11:28:05 PM
Re: Item seven
I disagree slightly here, in terms of degree. You don't have to be passionate about something, in love with something, in order to do it well as a profession. I think you have to be passionate about giving something your all and you have to be a professional, and you have to be able to find something new about your profession every so often to keep it interested. But do you always need to be in love with it, each and every day you wake up to go to work? No.
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