7 Ways Semantic Technologies Make Data Make Sense - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
Data Management // Big Data Analytics
News
12/28/2015
08:06 AM
Lisa Morgan
Lisa Morgan
Slideshows
Connect Directly
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail

7 Ways Semantic Technologies Make Data Make Sense

As unstructured data piles up, semantic technologies help organizations drive business value through a better understanding of the data they have, its value, and the relationships pieces of information have to each other.
8 of 8

Surface Critical Information Faster 

Keyword search is a fairly effective way to navigate unstructured data, but its efficiency is affected by the user's ability to select search terms that align with the desired content. The outcome is often an overabundance of results or lack of relevant results. Anything that was not explicitly stated in the search remains hidden. Semantic search is different because it's is not limited to explicit statements. It understands the meaning of information, its context, and its relationship to other pieces of information to deliver more precise results. But, like anything else, semantic technology also has limitations. 
'We found semantic technology is great for certain things or certain types of data that you want to get at, but not everything -- a table in a document, for example,' said Drew Warren, CEO of Recognos Financial. 'The part of big data that's often neglected is this notion of little data, the data in an organization that is of paramount importance to a firm, so we created a platform that will actually structure unstructured data.'
(Image: Geralt via Pixabay)

Surface Critical Information Faster

Keyword search is a fairly effective way to navigate unstructured data, but its efficiency is affected by the user's ability to select search terms that align with the desired content. The outcome is often an overabundance of results or lack of relevant results. Anything that was not explicitly stated in the search remains hidden. Semantic search is different because it's is not limited to explicit statements. It understands the meaning of information, its context, and its relationship to other pieces of information to deliver more precise results. But, like anything else, semantic technology also has limitations.

"We found semantic technology is great for certain things or certain types of data that you want to get at, but not everything -- a table in a document, for example," said Drew Warren, CEO of Recognos Financial. "The part of big data that's often neglected is this notion of little data, the data in an organization that is of paramount importance to a firm, so we created a platform that will actually structure unstructured data."

(Image: Geralt via Pixabay)

8 of 8
Comment  | 
Print  | 
InformationWeek Is Getting an Upgrade!

Find out more about our plans to improve the look, functionality, and performance of the InformationWeek site in the coming months.

Slideshows
10 Things Your Artificial Intelligence Initiative Needs to Succeed
Lisa Morgan, Freelance Writer,  4/20/2021
News
Tech Spending Climbs as Digital Business Initiatives Grow
Jessica Davis, Senior Editor, Enterprise Apps,  4/22/2021
Commentary
Optimizing the CIO and CFO Relationship
Mary E. Shacklett, Technology commentator and President of Transworld Data,  4/13/2021
White Papers
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
Video
Current Issue
Planning Your Digital Transformation Roadmap
Download this report to learn about the latest technologies and best practices or ensuring a successful transition from outdated business transformation tactics.
Slideshows
Flash Poll