Big Data App IDs Lookalike Prescription Pills - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
Data Management // Big Data Analytics
News
7/17/2013
04:26 PM
Connect Directly
Google+
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Big Data App IDs Lookalike Prescription Pills

Drawing on an extensive database of pill images, the MedSnap ID app for medical professionals uses the iPhone to quickly identify prescription pills and reduce medication errors.

5 Big Wishes For Big Data Deployments
5 Big Wishes For Big Data Deployments
(click image for larger view and for slideshow)

Here's an unpleasant scenario: You suddenly fall ill while out of town and hurry to the nearest ER. You wisely bring along your prescription pills -- all mixed together in one unmarked bottle -- but are too woozy to remember the names and doses of your medications.

Situations like these make life difficult for ER physicians and other medical professionals, who often are forced to make life-or-death decisions based on scant information about their patients' prescription drug usage. But MedSnap ID, a new subscription service from MedSnap, a Birmingham, Ala.-based startup, aims to improve things by identifying prescription pills visually to improve medication adherence and safety.

"Medication safety is something that's very important and expensive to U.S. healthcare, but it's also something that affects people personally," said Dr. Patrick Hymel, MedSnap's CEO and cofounder, in a phone interview with InformationWeek.

[ Want to make a baby -- pronto? Read Big Data Knows When You're Fertile. ]

With a background as an ER doctor, Hymel has first-hand knowledge of the problems that MedSnap ID aims to solve. "I had emergency experiences with patients bringing in pills and not knowing what those pills do," Hymel said. "Trying to get a history from a patient of what they've taken, it's very difficult."

Of course, medical professionals can make medication mistakes too, and these infrequent errors can prove deadly. A distracted doctor, for instance, might write a prescription incorrectly, or a pharmacist might dispense the wrong drug or dosage.

"These types of errors are very difficult to detect if you've got five minutes to talk to a patient in the emergency room," said Hymel.

We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Previous
1 of 2
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Slideshows
IT Careers: Top 10 US Cities for Tech Jobs
Cynthia Harvey, Freelance Journalist, InformationWeek,  1/14/2020
Commentary
Predictions for Cloud Computing in 2020
James Kobielus, Research Director, Futurum,  1/9/2020
News
What's Next: AI and Data Trends for 2020 and Beyond
Jessica Davis, Senior Editor, Enterprise Apps,  12/30/2019
White Papers
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
Video
Current Issue
The Cloud Gets Ready for the 20's
This IT Trend Report explores how cloud computing is being shaped for the next phase in its maturation. It will help enterprise IT decision makers and business leaders understand some of the key trends reflected emerging cloud concepts and technologies, and in enterprise cloud usage patterns. Get it today!
Slideshows
Flash Poll