Real-Time Analytics: 10 Ways To Get It Right - InformationWeek
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8/20/2015
12:06 PM
Lisa Morgan
Lisa Morgan
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Real-Time Analytics: 10 Ways To Get It Right

While real-time analytics is getting more affordable, it's still not right for everything. Here are 10 ways to get the most from real time, near real time, and batch use cases.
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Fine Tune Operations 

Large companies use real-time and near-real-time analytics to operate more efficiently. And the trend is moving downstream.
Restaurant Management Company is one of the largest Pizza Hut franchisees. It owns 140 locations in Texas, Oklahoma, Louisiana, New Jersey, Colorado, Wyoming, and Montana. The company tracks how long it takes to make a pizza, how long it takes for an order to be processed, how long a pizza sits on a rack before a delivery driver picks it up, how long a delivery driver is on the road, and how many deliveries a driver takes at one time.
'We track everything,' said Ken Syvarth, chief operating officer of Restaurant Management Company, in an interview.
The company recently started monitoring pizza ovens, freezers, and HVAC systems, purportedly in real time, to reduce energy costs. It expanded a seven-store SiteSage energy management system pilot to 57 stores. The system monitors events such as when a pizza oven or freezer is turned on or off, and the temperature of the unit, and it controls the HVAC systems. When an operating time or temperature is out of range, an area manager receives an alert about the problem.
'If it's really hot outside, a restaurant manager may crank up the air conditioning to 65 degrees and let it run all day, and at night [she may] forget to turn the air conditioner down, so it's cranking all night long,' said Syvarth. Eliminating such energy wasting behavior by providing alerts to managers is 'where we see a real savings,' he added.  
This type of alert is being used in other ways as well. For example, if a walk-in freezer is left off after a person does inventory, a manager is alerted when the temperature reaches a certain threshold in order to prevent the store from losing product.
(Image: bhumann34 via Pixabay)

Fine Tune Operations

Large companies use real-time and near-real-time analytics to operate more efficiently. And the trend is moving downstream.

Restaurant Management Company is one of the largest Pizza Hut franchisees. It owns 140 locations in Texas, Oklahoma, Louisiana, New Jersey, Colorado, Wyoming, and Montana. The company tracks how long it takes to make a pizza, how long it takes for an order to be processed, how long a pizza sits on a rack before a delivery driver picks it up, how long a delivery driver is on the road, and how many deliveries a driver takes at one time.

"We track everything," said Ken Syvarth, chief operating officer of Restaurant Management Company, in an interview.

The company recently started monitoring pizza ovens, freezers, and HVAC systems, purportedly in real time, to reduce energy costs. It expanded a seven-store SiteSage energy management system pilot to 57 stores. The system monitors events such as when a pizza oven or freezer is turned on or off, and the temperature of the unit, and it controls the HVAC systems. When an operating time or temperature is out of range, an area manager receives an alert about the problem.

"If it's really hot outside, a restaurant manager may crank up the air conditioning to 65 degrees and let it run all day, and at night [she may] forget to turn the air conditioner down, so it's cranking all night long," said Syvarth. Eliminating such energy wasting behavior by providing alerts to managers is "where we see a real savings," he added.

This type of alert is being used in other ways as well. For example, if a walk-in freezer is left off after a person does inventory, a manager is alerted when the temperature reaches a certain threshold in order to prevent the store from losing product.

(Image: bhumann34 via Pixabay)

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GinaA474
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GinaA474,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/3/2015 | 12:15:30 PM
Great examples of real use case scenarios
The customer experience example with iHeart radio really shows the power of analytics. 
shamika
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shamika,
User Rank: Ninja
8/27/2015 | 7:07:01 AM
Re: Real time analytics
"Online customers are notoriously impatient". Correct. I am one of them too. They expect the solution to be on their fingertips. In my opinion this is especially applicable for financial institutes.
shamika
50%
50%
shamika,
User Rank: Ninja
8/27/2015 | 6:57:53 AM
Real time analytics
I agree with the concept that bank uses. However as you said batch processing will take place towards the close of business which is a concern at the moment. I think there will be a solutions for this soon.  
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