Real-Time Analytics: 10 Ways To Get It Right - InformationWeek

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8/20/2015
12:06 PM
Lisa Morgan
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Real-Time Analytics: 10 Ways To Get It Right

While real-time analytics is getting more affordable, it's still not right for everything. Here are 10 ways to get the most from real time, near real time, and batch use cases.
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Minimize Downtime And Security Breaches 

IT departments are using real-time analytics to identify aberrant behavior within systems.
'Real-time analytics makes sense for solving tactical problems. As an example, if the transaction time of a system is degrading, you need to find out why before it impacts your service level agreement. Using real-time analytics, you can identify the root cause of a performance degradation by identifying systems involved in the problem chain automatically running the data analysis on the related systems,' said Jim Bercik, CTO at system and infrastructure monitoring solution provider Sightline Systems, in an interview. 'Batch analytics makes sense for solving strategic problems. With batch analysis, IT executives can make informed purchasing decisions based on projected resource utilization across the entire IT infrastructure.'
For example, an insurance company may be capturing metrics of a complex application operation to identify anomalies occurring in front-end web applications, a middleware server, and a backend database server.
'Every few minutes they're looking for any deviations that show up in those key metrics so they can get to the root cause, sometimes before the end user has experienced a problem,' said Mike Paquette, VP of security products at anomaly analytics detection solution provider Prelert, in an interview. 'We look at it as near real time because it takes time from the event for the log to be written into the log store, and then it takes time for the data to be aggregated and indexed, and some time for the analytics to run. Usually the analytics takes a short period of time to run, but the amount of time it took for the log data to be gathered, collected, indexed, and made available can take longer. That's why we say things [occurring] around five minutes would fall into near real time.'
Detecting security breaches has necessarily moved to real time. Packets are analyzed as they flow through a network so security operations can act swiftly.
'It's standard practice to employ some real-time technologies such as network traffic analysis,' said Paquette. 'Software agents are running on computers looking at the real-time memory footprint of the software programs that are running, so if something looks anomalous on the client itself, it will know within microseconds if there's a strange behavior going on.'
(Image: Sverneophx via Pixabay)

Minimize Downtime And Security Breaches

IT departments are using real-time analytics to identify aberrant behavior within systems.

"Real-time analytics makes sense for solving tactical problems. As an example, if the transaction time of a system is degrading, you need to find out why before it impacts your service level agreement. Using real-time analytics, you can identify the root cause of a performance degradation by identifying systems involved in the problem chain automatically running the data analysis on the related systems," said Jim Bercik, CTO at system and infrastructure monitoring solution provider Sightline Systems, in an interview. "Batch analytics makes sense for solving strategic problems. With batch analysis, IT executives can make informed purchasing decisions based on projected resource utilization across the entire IT infrastructure."

For example, an insurance company may be capturing metrics of a complex application operation to identify anomalies occurring in front-end web applications, a middleware server, and a backend database server.

"Every few minutes they're looking for any deviations that show up in those key metrics so they can get to the root cause, sometimes before the end user has experienced a problem," said Mike Paquette, VP of security products at anomaly analytics detection solution provider Prelert, in an interview. "We look at it as near real time because it takes time from the event for the log to be written into the log store, and then it takes time for the data to be aggregated and indexed, and some time for the analytics to run. Usually the analytics takes a short period of time to run, but the amount of time it took for the log data to be gathered, collected, indexed, and made available can take longer. That's why we say things [occurring] around five minutes would fall into near real time."

Detecting security breaches has necessarily moved to real time. Packets are analyzed as they flow through a network so security operations can act swiftly.

"It's standard practice to employ some real-time technologies such as network traffic analysis," said Paquette. "Software agents are running on computers looking at the real-time memory footprint of the software programs that are running, so if something looks anomalous on the client itself, it will know within microseconds if there's a strange behavior going on."

(Image: Sverneophx via Pixabay)

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