Internet Of Things: Current Privacy Policies Don't Work - InformationWeek

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IoT
IoT
Data Management // Hardware/Architectures
Commentary
6/30/2014
09:06 AM
Marc Loewenthal
Marc Loewenthal
Commentary

Internet Of Things: Current Privacy Policies Don't Work

Traditional ways to deliver privacy guidelines, such as online postings or click-through mechanisms, don't work with the Internet of Things.

(Source: Tilemahos Efthimiadis on Flickr)
(Source: Tilemahos Efthimiadis on Flickr)

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tekedge
50%
50%
tekedge,
User Rank: Moderator
6/30/2014 | 11:52:07 PM
Intenet of things
I think it is a tall order and really wonder how this can be achieved. It looks good in theory but how to get it to work is a big question in my mind. With so many apps out there where do we stop to protect privacy.
Thomas Claburn
50%
50%
Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
6/30/2014 | 5:57:39 PM
Re: Pay attention to the possible consequences instead of always focusing on the positive.
Well said. The IoT looks a lot more appealing with the data owner is the only one with access to the data. 
GAProgrammer
50%
50%
GAProgrammer,
User Rank: Ninja
6/30/2014 | 1:16:33 PM
Pay attention to the possible consequences instead of always focusing on the positive.
IoT is great when it is ONLY YOUR data and devices being monitored and can usher in a new era of detailed information. See John Deere and CSX.

However, for every plus, you have to deal with the minuses.  For example:

" Consider establishing frameworks for different types of connected devices. For example, common terms-of-use for any devices tied to smart grids that track electricity and water usage might be used to reward individuals for conservation and assist in determining utility pricing."

Tthis sounds great until you realize that it can also be used to PUNISH anyone who doesn't comply with some arbitrary measurement of "conservation" or even worse, a government definition (see "healthy" as defined by the US Govt - a 5'10" male should be 145lbs. That is just sickly!)

Ironically, most of the purported benefits of IoT go away when you anonymize the info for privacy purposes.

We should always strive to innovate and find better ways of doing things - but not when the solution causes or creates more issues than the original problem.
Laurianne
50%
50%
Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
6/30/2014 | 1:16:07 PM
IoT Data correction
"Provide users reasonable access to their personally identifiable information, and give them the ability to change or correct it." I agree with this goal, but scratch my head at how hard this will be to achieve.

There is little incentive for Whirlpool to create an "appliance data clearinghouse," right?
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