10 In-Memory Database Options Power Speedy Performance - InformationWeek

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2/9/2015
11:48 AM
Doug Henschen
Doug Henschen
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10 In-Memory Database Options Power Speedy Performance

From Altibase to VoltDB, and covering options from IBM, Microsoft, Oracle, and SAP, we wrap up leading in-memory databases and add-on options. When you need speed, here are 10 tools to choose.
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sgraves980
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sgraves980,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/13/2015 | 12:37:37 PM
eXtremeDB
eXtremeDB was first released in 2001.  It was the first in-memory embedded database system written explicitly for embedded systems.  TimesTen, Altibase and Polyhedra were on the market, but none of them could be used in embedded systems.  Today, we have more than 20 million run-time copies of eXtremeDB embedded in devices ranging from networking equipment to consumer electronics to industrial control to aerospace/defense.  eXtremeDB is also gaining in popularity with the financial markets with applications in high frequency trading, algorithmic trading, matching engines, and risk management.
D. Henschen
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D. Henschen,
User Rank: Author
2/12/2015 | 2:57:37 PM
Why weren't we included?
After this was posted, I heard from Exasol and Starcounter, both of which asked why they were not included. Both are smallish, European-headquartered companies that don't have big customer counts. Exasol is the larger of the two. I've talked to customers and I think of Exasol as a database that can make use of lots of RAM, but not really as an in-memory database. (To be fair, Oracle, Microsoft, and Teradata aren't "in-memory" either, but they offer in-memory add-on features.) Starcounter pitches itself as an in-memory database engine and application server, which is a slightly different proposition than the other products mentioned here.

I did not hear from Pivotal, which offers the SQLFire in-memory database. Pivotal is a more prominent vendor with more customers than either of the two companies above. If I were to list 11 options, that's the one I would add. I guess Pivotal has bigger concerns (like its larger cloud and big data strategies) than worrying about the visibility of just one of its many products.

 
Li Tan
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Li Tan,
User Rank: Ninja
2/10/2015 | 12:33:38 AM
Re: MongoDB will be the next to join this set
Currently my company used MongoDB quite a lot and I am willing to listen to further updates on the in-memory version. How is the experiment going? How long it will take to get a trial version in production?
D. Henschen
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D. Henschen,
User Rank: Author
2/9/2015 | 2:52:12 PM
MongoDB will be the next to join this set
I contemplated adding MongoDB to this list, but the "In-Memory Experimental" storage engine included with just-released MongoDB 3.0 is, as the name suggests, only experimental at this point. It may be generally available for production use within just a few months, but I didn't feel it was ready to highlight as an in-memory product offering just yet. Stay tuned.
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