What Healthcare Analytics Can Teach The Rest of Us - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
Data Management
Commentary
11/22/2016
02:30 PM
Lisa Morgan
Lisa Morgan
Commentary
Connect Directly
Twitter
RSS
100%
0%

What Healthcare Analytics Can Teach The Rest of Us

Analytics are taking on a lead role in all phases of the healthcare system. Those personal fitness devices? Their value is in what they say about us, not the data itself.

Healthcare analytics is evolving rapidly. In addition to using traditional business intelligence solutions, there is data flowing from hospital equipment, medical-grade wearables, and FitBits.

The business-related data and patient-related data, sometimes combined with outside data, enable hospitals to triage emergency care patients and treat patients more effectively, which is important. For example, in the U.S., Medicare and Medicaid are embracing "value-based care" which means hospitals are now being compensated for positive outcomes rather than on the number of services they provide, and they're docked for "excessive" readmissions. Similarly, doctors are increasingly being compensated for positive outcomes rather than the number of patients they see. In other words, analytics is more necessary than ever.

The Effect of the IoT

Medical devices are becoming connected devices in operating rooms and hospital rooms. Meanwhile, pharmaceutical companies are beginning to connect products such as inhalers to get better insight into a drug's actual use and effects, and they're experimenting with medical-grade (and typically application-specific) devices in clinical trials to reduce costs and hassles while getting better insights into a patient's physical status. Surgeons are combining analytics sometimes with telemedicine to improve the results of a surgical procedures. Slowly but surely, analytics are seeping into just about every aspect of healthcare to lower costs, increase efficiencies, and reduce patient risks in a more systematic way.

Read more of Lisa Morgan's report on the use of analytics in healthcare on All Analytics.

Lisa Morgan is a freelance writer who covers big data and BI for InformationWeek. She has contributed articles, reports, and other types of content to various publications and sites ranging from SD Times to the Economist Intelligent Unit. Frequent areas of coverage include ... View Full Bio
We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Slideshows
What Digital Transformation Is (And Isn't)
Cynthia Harvey, Freelance Journalist, InformationWeek,  12/4/2019
Commentary
Watch Out for New Barriers to Faster Software Development
Lisa Morgan, Freelance Writer,  12/3/2019
Commentary
If DevOps Is So Awesome, Why Is Your Initiative Failing?
Guest Commentary, Guest Commentary,  12/2/2019
White Papers
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
State of the Cloud
State of the Cloud
Cloud has drastically changed how IT organizations consume and deploy services in the digital age. This research report will delve into public, private and hybrid cloud adoption trends, with a special focus on infrastructure as a service and its role in the enterprise. Find out the challenges organizations are experiencing, and the technologies and strategies they are using to manage and mitigate those challenges today.
Video
Current Issue
Getting Started With Emerging Technologies
Looking to help your enterprise IT team ease the stress of putting new/emerging technologies such as AI, machine learning and IoT to work for their organizations? There are a few ways to get off on the right foot. In this report we share some expert advice on how to approach some of these seemingly daunting tech challenges.
Slideshows
Flash Poll