Architects and Engineers Get Eprint Option - InformationWeek

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Government // Mobile & Wireless
Commentary
11/15/2010
04:00 PM
Lamont Wood
Lamont Wood
Commentary
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Architects and Engineers Get Eprint Option

Wide-format HP inkjet allows remote printing of plans and diagrams. Scanning and copying is also supported.

Wide-format HP inkjet allows remote printing of plans and diagrams. Scanning and copying is also supported.Architect and engineering offices being fine examples of high-tech SMBs, I was intrigued to see HP announce the ePrint version of the HP Designjet T2300 eMFP, a wide-format unit for printing, scanning, and copying design documents up to 44 inches wide. If you need one, there's probably no substitute.

Then I read the press release, and viewed the beautifully produced marketing videos, and was left with picky questions about certain obscure details concerning the unit, like the price.

I pointed this out, days passed while wheels turned, and I got answers:

Price: $8,450 US

Colors: six (cyan, gray, magenta, matte black, photo black, yellow)

Printer DPI: 2400x2400, +/- 0.1% line accuracy

Scanner DPI: 600x600

Line Drawing Speed: 28 seconds per page on A1/D, or 103 A1/D prints per hour

Color Image Printing Speed: 445 square feet per hour in Fast mode; 33.3 square feet per hour in Best mode

Ink cartridges: $69 per for 130 ml, with a yield varying from 38,714 square feet on plain paper with color schematics to 1,130 square feet for photo-realistic color images on photo gloss paper.

Meanwhile, the ePrint designation means that it does not need to be directly connected to a computer. If it is on the Internet you can send files to it via e-mail.

Finally, publicity people of the world: these were not difficult or obscure questions, especially the unit price. Sure, you'd rather produce videos of models with their sleeves rolled up using the hardware in immaculately styled offices. I've been there. But inevitably someone will ask "How much?" They're never going to ask about the color scheme the models are wearing. Please plan accordingly.

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