Census Report Shows IT Boom - InformationWeek

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Census Report Shows IT Boom

A new Census Bureau report shows a boom in the IT industry in recent years, citing big gains in everything from employment numbers to online spending.

The Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2000 was released last week by the Commerce Department's Census Bureau and is compiled from numerous sources of data, not including the 2000 Census. "We talked to about 300 different federal, private and international organizations to come up with this portrait of America," says Glenn King, chief of the Census Bureau's office of Statistical Compendia and coordinator of the report.

The 1,012-page abstract covers a range of topics, from prescription drug sales to prison operating expenditures. It has been published every year since 1878, and is being expanded to include analysis of new technologies and businesses. King says the bureau has just begun to examine many aspects of IT growth but will be looking more deeply into it in coming years.

According to the report, information technology (defined as hardware, software, and services for computers and communications) grew from a $371 billion industry in 1992, accounting for 5.9% of the U.S. economy's gross domestic income, to an estimated $815 billion or 8.3% of the economy in 2000. The software and services segment, which covers an area ranging from the sale of prepackaged software to systems design, was the fastest-growing category, more than tripling from a $75 billion industry in 1992 to one with an estimated income of $246 billion in 2000.

Gross Domestic Income in Information Technologies (IT) Industries: 1992 to 2000 [in millions of dollars]
Industry
1992 1995 1998 1999 2000
Total all IT industries
371,080 491,292 665,530 746,092 814,727
Percent share of the economy
5.9 6.7 7.6 8.0 8.3
Hardware
110,050 155,409 210,914 226,214 243,506
Computers and equipment, calc. machines
24,102 31,036 39,211 42,622 46,330
Computers and equipment wholesale sales
39,743 51,114 75,084 81,106 88,162
Computers and equipment retail sales
1,915 2,861 3,407 3,687 4,008
Electron tubes
1,053 1,206 1,317 1,402 1,493
Printed circuit boards
3,556 4,406 5,527 5,604 5,683
Semiconductors
18,308 40,836 57,055 60,763 64,713
Passive electronic components
13,494 15,310 12,072 12,881 13,744
Industrial instruments for measurement
2,552 2,526 4,874 5,215 5,580
Instruments for measuring electricity
3,493 3,981 8,383 8,953 9,562
Laboratory analytical instruments
1,835 2,134 3,986 3,982 4,233
Software/services
75,490 111,350 185,609 213,986 245,644
Computer programming services
18,624 26,120 47,796 55,013 62,715
Prepackaged software
14,555 22,768 34,497 40,016 46,419
Computer integrated systems design
11,814 13,599 24,692 28,420 32,598
Computer processing and data preparation
12,554 21,844 28,062 32,300 37,048
Information retrieval services
2,879 3,910 8,977 10,333 11,852
Computer services management
1,910 2,090 2,942 3,386 3,884
Computer rental leasing
1,528 1,880 2,944 3,389 3,887
Computer maintenance and repair
4,989 6,949 10,029 11,544 13,241
Computer related services
4,406 9,305 21,261 24,472 28,069
Communications hardware
23,970 30,775 46,710 49,151 51,816
Telephone and telegraph equipment
10,251 12,139 21,807 22,592 23,405
Radio and TV communications equipment
10,134 14,310 20,642 22,252 23,987
Communications services
161,570 193,758 222,298 256,740 273,761
Telephone and telegraph communications
129,960 145,491 159,712 189,400 199,109
Television broadcasting
11,649 18,442 22,740 23,520 26,551
Cable and other pay TV services
14,992 21,778 29,798 32,266 35,231

An estimated 5.2 million people were employed in IT in 1998, up 33% from 3.9 million in 1992. That rate far outpaces the total private industry job growth of about 18% over that period. Again, software and services were the fastest-growing segment of the industry, up 90% to 1.6 million jobs in 1998 from 854,000 in 1992. Private-industry IT wages increased nearly 20% from an average of $25,400 annually in 1992 to $31,400 in 1998.

Information Technologies (IT) - Employment and Wages: 1992 to 1998
Employment (1,000s) Annual wages per worker ($)
Industry
1992 1995 1998 1992 1995 1998
Total private industry
89,956 97,885 106,007 25,400 27,200 31,400
Total IT-producing industry
3,875 4,240 5,156 41,300 46,400 58,000
Hardware
1,436 1,475 1,708 42,400 46,300 58,000
Electronic computers
242 190 200 52,400 59,600 83,900
Computers and equipment wholesalers
277 285 367 52,500 54,300 69,700
Computers and equipment retailers
75 94 126 32,200 33,800 40,400
Computer storage devices & peripherals
91 105 119 41,200 46,500 57,400
Computer terminals, office & accounting machines
58 58 61 43,300 46,600 56,900
Electron tubes
27 24 20 38,400 41,900 46,400
Semiconductors
217 235 284 44,500 53,800 64,400
Printed circuit boards, electronic capacitors
157 187 208 25,700 28,300 32,900
Electronic components
127 135 148 29,700 32,900 37,500
Industrial instruments for measurement
61 64 67 35,100 38,400 46,400
Instruments for measuring electricity
76 71 77 42,500 51,600 62,900
Analytical instruments
28 28 32 38,700 44,200 54,300
Software/services
854 1,110 1,625 44,300 50,700 65,300
Computer programming services
169 245 370 46,200 52,700 64,700
Prepackaged software
131 181 252 5,700 63,700 94,100
Computer integrated systems design
103 130 178 48,600 54,700 65,400
Computer processing and data preparation
204 223 254 34,400 39,700 45,800
Information retrieval services
45 57 98 36,700 42,200 63,700
Computer maintenance and repair
43 49 60 36,600 37,800 41,200
Computer services management, rental & leasing, maintenance & repair
141 205 387 46,000 51,800 64,100
Communications equipment
317 337 353 38,900 43,200 53,700
Telephone and telegraph equipment
110 112 126 42,400 49,900 62,400
Radio and TV communications equipment
129 153 156 39,100 42,700 52,100
Communications services
1,269 1,318 1,469 38,600 43,700 50,900
Telephone communications
885 900 1,007 41,400 46,800 53,700
Telephone and telegraph communications
26 27 35 41,700 48,500 56,200
Television broadcasting
115 123 131 41,400 47,200 54,600
Cable and other pay TV services
131 156 181 29,600 34,600 42,200

The total number of telecommunications carriers (including local service, wireless, and toll-service providers) increased 46% from 2,847 in 1994 to 4,144 in 1998. Telecommunications revenues saw a similar surge, jumping 41% from $175 billion in 1994 to $246 billion in 1998.

Telecommunications Industry - Carriers and Revenues: 1994 to 1998
[Revenue in millions of dollars]
Carriers Telecommunications revenue (in million $)
Category
1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998
Total
2,847 3,058 3,832 3,604 4,144 174,890 190,076 211,782 231,168 246,392
Local service providers
1,574 1,675 2,028 2,066 2,239 99,011 103,792 109,273 108,568<

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