CES 2015: Wearable Tech Is Business At The Flick Of A Wrist - InformationWeek

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Mobile // Mobile Devices
Commentary
1/9/2015
10:00 AM

CES 2015: Wearable Tech Is Business At The Flick Of A Wrist

What do the wearable devices on display at CES 2015 have in common with enterprise business intelligence? Turns out, quite a bit.
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kstaron
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kstaron,
User Rank: Ninja
1/17/2015 | 2:21:11 PM
Re: pic
Oddly enough there are low tech wearables for kids. I put little stickers in the shapes of fish on my swim-suited kids. The stickers changed color when it got a certain amount of sun exposure which signaled it was time to sunscreen up again. I can see kids wanting to wear some kind of fun wearable that turned different colors in the pool and made a cool little sound to signal for more sunscreen or even a reminder to go get some water.
Whoopty
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Whoopty,
User Rank: Ninja
1/12/2015 | 12:45:02 PM
Intel?
I like how wearables are looking so diverse right now. You have everything from the Oculus Rift headset, to smartwatches and fitness bands, but I think the big innovation will be when it starts being integrated more into clothing. Intel's Curie platform is pretty exciting in that regard.
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
1/10/2015 | 7:07:31 AM
BI & change
Curt, 

"We're absolutely seeing the market move away from the simple fitness trackers and I think that's similar to what's happening in business analytics, as well."

As Heraclitus once said: There is nothing permanent except change. 

Fitness trackers had their moment and evolved into more complex wearables all with their corresponding app. There is an interesting tendency with focus on health and fitness. So, maybe soon conditions like obesity and diabetes can be more controlled.

It's interesting you note the parallel of what is happening in business analytics. With the change, enterprise leaders have to be more than alert and fit to face such change and lead the enterprise toward the best direction. Because, once again, anything is as permanent as change.

-Susan 
Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Author
1/9/2015 | 3:24:25 PM
Re: pic
@Curt On the vitamin D thing, I remember when my pediatricians said it was no concern for children. Several years ago, when doctors first started looking at vitamin D levels in adults and started recommending supplements, I asked my pediatrician about it for children. He said there was no concern for them, but two years later, the concern extended to children.  Many kids don't drink much milk today and so miss out on the vitamin D added to it. I try to buy orange juice fortified with calcium and vitamin D and do offer my kids the supplements. Not all are willing to take, though, not because they can't but because they don't like tablets. As for actual sun exposure, the pediatricians recommend 15 minutes a day, but there's no way they're getting that here in the winter. 
Curt Franklin
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Curt Franklin,
User Rank: Strategist
1/9/2015 | 2:53:03 PM
Re: pic
It's interesting that you bring up excessive sun exposure: While that's still a concern, many of the devices at CES are also alerting parents/wearers if they aren't getting enough sun! It seems that the worry about skin cancer is leading to a huge wave of vitamin D deficiencies (with all sorts of un-healthy side effects). Getting enough sun without getting too much is part of what the devices are trying to help with. I know it's a real thing: Even though I live in Florida, I have to make sure to spend enough time in the sun to keep from having major issues, since my body doesn't use the oral vitamin D nearly as well as the "real stuff."

I think this is the sort of thing that many of the BI programs are trying to do, as well: Keep track of all sorts of factors, both obvious and subtle, so that we don't get into unintended consequences when we try to optimize for one factor.

And for what it's worth, I agree with you: No technology takes the place of involved, educated parenting when it comes to a child's health and well-being.
Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Author
1/9/2015 | 2:40:00 PM
Re: pic
@Curt As a parent, I  have to say that nothing takes the place of direct supervision. You mention sun exposure, which happens to be one of the things I take very seriously. You have to really instill in children the need to put on sunscreen, reapply it, and avoid strong midday sun. It also helps to not leave their shoulders and back exposed. If that were the concern for the kids in the picture, they'd be better off with rashguards than a wearable device.
Curt Franklin
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Curt Franklin,
User Rank: Strategist
1/9/2015 | 2:29:06 PM
Re: pic
Ariella, while the story isn't specifically about kids there were a lot of wearables at CES intended for children. They ranged from security (telling you if the child wanders out of a pre-defined radius or area) to health (keeping track of sun exposure, activity, or environmental factors for the child).

We're absolutely seeing the market move away from the simple fitness trackers and I think that's similar to what's happening in business analytics, as well. We're seeing BI move out of the financial and sales realms to look at how the business should plan its future moves in all kinds of areas. The real question for many executives is what to do with all this new information and direction -- and how to know whether the advice is good or just "safe".
Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Author
1/9/2015 | 11:05:35 AM
pic
Is the picture of kids in bathing suits meant to suggest wearables for them? These kids don't have anything on their wrists.  It also seems a bit extreme to clamp them on children unless there is a health issue that needs some form of monitoring.
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