8 Reasons IT Pros Hate The Cloud - InformationWeek

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8 Reasons IT Pros Hate The Cloud

We sense a simmering level of vitriol whenever we speak with IT professionals about the cloud in our daily conversations, at industry conferences, and in other settings. Here's why.
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(Image: Alois Wonasheutz via Pixabay)

Hate is a powerful word. Yet, it accurately describes how IT professionals feel about cloud computing. They're not screaming it from the rooftops, or starting protests in social media, but there's a quiet level of vitriol we hear whenever we speak with IT professionals about the cloud in our daily conversations, at industry conferences, and in other settings.

Yes, cloud computing can cut costs (if done properly). Yes, cloud computing can improve economies of scale. And yes, cloud computing can streamline IT processes. Despite these and other clear-cut benefits, there are many infrastructure administrators who find enough problems with cloud computing that they end up loathing the whole concept altogether.

Why do IT pros hate the cloud? Some find it hard to believe that cloud computing is only continuing to gain popularity. Some object to the purely technical issues that pose problems for IT pros who are used to maintaining data and applications in-house. They feel the cloud creates more work for them. Oftentimes, the issue is rooted in the difficulty that IT admins are having transitioning to new roles. With cloud-based infrastructure, platforms, or software, hands-on technical skills aren't needed as much as they once were in IT. Instead, many enterprises seek professionals who can act as systems architects, bringing a high-level vision of end-to-end infrastructure.

With time, these and other pet peeves will be resolved. For now, though, cloud hatred is a serious problem. So serious, in fact, that it can distort the roadmap for many IT organizations. If the cloud is ignored, it can cost businesses time, money, and productivity. While some IT shops can get away with avoiding anything cloud-related today, this won't be an option for most of us in the future.

That's why it's so important to air these concerns and discuss them now. In all likelihood, the cloud is here to stay, so it's important that we identify what's causing the hate, so it can be addressed and we can all move forward. Once you've reviewed this airing of the grievances, let us know how you feel about the cloud. Have you found workarounds to lessen the pain caused by cloud implementations? Have we missed anything about cloud computing that you simply cannot stand? Tell us all about it in the comments section below.

Andrew has well over a decade of enterprise networking under his belt through his consulting practice, which specializes in enterprise network architectures and datacenter build-outs and prior experience at organizations such as State Farm Insurance, United Airlines and the ... View Full Bio

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Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
5/26/2015 | 6:58:50 PM
Re: There's a difference between a fact and a possibility
@abrantley: if you ever want to change careers, let me know, there's a future for you in editing copy.

You're right that the sentence would have been more clear without the word "fact" in it.

 
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
5/26/2015 | 6:50:31 PM
Re: The Problem is "Public" Cloud for business
>The battle cry of IT needs to incorporate: OWN YOUR DATA! (or someone else will)

Or encrypt it. Sadly, many companies can't afford massive data centers. The cloud is great for when you need 1000 CPUs for three hours, but not for the remainder of the year.
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