Dell, EMC Deal: 10 Things IT Needs To Know - InformationWeek

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10/13/2015
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Dell, EMC Deal: 10 Things IT Needs To Know

Enterprise IT executives were left wondering what the massive Dell-EMC deal might mean to them. There's a lot you'll want to know (especially if you're an EMC customer). As we ponder the implications of the massive merger, what springs to mind are 10 ways we expect the deal to impact IT.
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(Image: EMC Corporation via Flickr)

(Image: EMC Corporation via Flickr)

Dell announced its plans to buy EMC Corp. on Oct. 12 for $67 billion in what's being called the largest "pure tech" acquisition in history. It's also the largest acquisition involving a tech company since AOL's  ill-fated $160 billion purchase of Time Warner, which closed in 2001.

As the Dell-EMC news sent the financial press into a frenzy of analysis on Monday, enterprise IT executives were left wondering what the massive deal might mean to them. There are a lot of things you'll want to know (especially if you're an EMC customer).

For starters, the deal encompasses nearly every aspect of enterprise IT you can imagine, including storage, cloud services, virtualization, security, and system management. It's also poised to reframe the IT vendor landscape for years to come. As we ponder the implications of the massive merger, what springs to mind are 10 ways we expect the deal to impact IT.

[Check out these 10 emerging trends that are changing IT.]

Some of the items on this list have to do with the sheer scope of the deal. Others concern the possibility of synergy (yes, I hate the word, too) between business units at EMC and those at Dell. Then there are a couple that fall into the, "Oh, yeah -- they own that" category of lessons. All of them, though, are factors that could have an impact on your IT operation in the coming years.

At this point, it's worth remembering that the sale isn't a done deal. US regulators could put the kibosh on everything, or another company could swoop in to offer even more stock and cash for EMC. The odds are pretty darned good, though, that EMC will be a Dell company before too long.

Did the announcement catch you by surprise? Do you think it's going to have an impact on your IT operation? Let us know -- and let us know if there are critical factors that we managed to leave off this list. This deal is going to keep people in the industry talking for a long time to come, so we might as well start the conversation now. After you've reviewed our list, let's meet up in the comments section below and discuss.

Curtis Franklin Jr. is Senior Analyst at Omdia, focusing on enterprise security management. Curtis has been writing about technologies and products in computing and networking since the early 1980s. He has been on staff and contributed to technology-industry publications ... View Full Bio

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