Considering the Web as a Platform - InformationWeek
IoT
IoT
Cloud
Commentary
3/12/2008
08:50 AM
David Linthicum
David Linthicum
Commentary
50%
50%
RELATED EVENTS
Building Security for the IoT
Nov 09, 2017
In this webcast, experts discuss the most effective approaches to securing Internet-enabled system ...Read More>>

Considering the Web as a Platform

Back in the day, meaning 1995... cross-platform tools promised that you could write an application once and run it on any number of platforms. Most of them worked equally poorly on all platforms, and not many of those tools are around today... The Web marked the emergence of a new application platform that ran within browsers...

Back in the day, meaning 1995, I was doing developer-tool reviews for Byte Magazine, PC Magazine, DBMS (now Intelligent Enterprise), and a few others. Those gigs where a blast since I was able to play with the newest and coolest development tools out there, review them, and hold my thumb up or down like Caesar. I was younger, had more hair, a huge ego, and one of those new-fangled Pentium computers... life was good. Now I just have the huge ego.

What was cool at the time was cross-platform tools, or, tools that promised that you could write an application once and run it on any number of platforms. Long story short, most of them worked equally poorly on all platforms. The fact is that you can't be excellent on all of them. Pretty sure not many of those tools are around today.What happened was the Web, and thus the emergence of a new application platform that ran within browsers. Thus, there was no need to write application translation layers between the applications and the native operating system. Instead you wrote applications for the browsers, including HTML, CGI, ISAPI, NSAPI, Java, Flash, etc., and heterogeneity was part of the deal.

While the platform of the Web, or the browser, seemed logical for many applications, it had its shortcomings. In many instances it did not look native, and could not interact well with native applications and operating system services. Moreover, support for browsers was not always the same, and if you needed storage, communications, or API support, you had to write back to local resources, which meant many Web applications were not that portable. After years and years of evolving, we now have a true platform, at least in my mind. The Web today provides a truly portable and native-looking interface, Ajax, which supports the notion of a Rich Internet Application (RIA). We also now have database services on-demand, such as Amazon's SimpleDB, on-demand services such as those offered by StrikeIron, and on-demand development platforms such as the one offered by Salesforce.com's Apex platform-as-a-service, and you can pretty much find anything else you need out there as well.Back in the day, meaning 1995... cross-platform tools promised that you could write an application once and run it on any number of platforms. Most of them worked equally poorly on all platforms, and not many of those tools are around today... The Web marked the emergence of a new application platform that ran within browsers...

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
How Enterprises Are Attacking the IT Security Enterprise
How Enterprises Are Attacking the IT Security Enterprise
To learn more about what organizations are doing to tackle attacks and threats we surveyed a group of 300 IT and infosec professionals to find out what their biggest IT security challenges are and what they're doing to defend against today's threats. Download the report to see what they're saying.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
2017 State of IT Report
In today's technology-driven world, "innovation" has become a basic expectation. IT leaders are tasked with making technical magic, improving customer experience, and boosting the bottom line -- yet often without any increase to the IT budget. How are organizations striking the balance between new initiatives and cost control? Download our report to learn about the biggest challenges and how savvy IT executives are overcoming them.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.
Flash Poll