Interop: Vendors Still Confuse With Cloud Computing Definitions - InformationWeek
IoT
IoT
Cloud
Commentary
5/19/2009
06:35 PM
Connect Directly
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%
RELATED EVENTS
Building Security for the IoT
Nov 09, 2017
In this webcast, experts discuss the most effective approaches to securing Internet-enabled system ...Read More>>

Interop: Vendors Still Confuse With Cloud Computing Definitions

The afternoon keynotes at Interop saw IBM, HP and SAP giving their visions of cloud computing. While the companies had a number of real deliverables to talk about, the keynotes also showed that vendors continue to confound and confuse with their various conflicting definitions.

The afternoon keynotes at Interop saw IBM, HP and SAP giving their visions of cloud computing. While the companies had a number of real deliverables to talk about, the keynotes also showed that vendors continue to confound and confuse with their various conflicting definitions.One Tweet from an Interop attendee should serve as a proof point: "After two full days, you would think I could define the 'cloud.' Not." And this after an Enterprise Cloud Summit and any number of sessions that touch on "cloud computing."

SAP, HP and IBM aren't traditionally thought of as cloud vendors in the same vein as Amazon, Google, Salesforce.com or even Microsoft. In the eyes of many, SAP is a stodgy on premises vendor, and HP and IBM sell hardware and managed services rather than cloud computing.

Their definitions didn't make things much more clear. IBM, for example, gave a hazy guidance about $66 billion in possible cloud computing revenue opportunity. SAP called iTunes an online banking examples of cloud computing. It's almost like "Web 2.0" redux.

While the market, including InformationWeek in some places, is having trouble defining cloud computing, there are some folks with good working definitions. The National Institute of Standards and Technology, for example, recently released a draft definition of cloud computing that the government is already using for requests for information. Others, including the University of California at Berkeley, also have workable definitions.

It's evidence that while we're in the early days, there really is such a thing as cloud computing, and it's not just Internet-based computing, whatever some vendors might have you believe.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
How Enterprises Are Attacking the IT Security Enterprise
How Enterprises Are Attacking the IT Security Enterprise
To learn more about what organizations are doing to tackle attacks and threats we surveyed a group of 300 IT and infosec professionals to find out what their biggest IT security challenges are and what they're doing to defend against today's threats. Download the report to see what they're saying.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
2017 State of IT Report
In today's technology-driven world, "innovation" has become a basic expectation. IT leaders are tasked with making technical magic, improving customer experience, and boosting the bottom line -- yet often without any increase to the IT budget. How are organizations striking the balance between new initiatives and cost control? Download our report to learn about the biggest challenges and how savvy IT executives are overcoming them.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.
Flash Poll