Performance Anxiety: What the Intuit Problem Tells Us About the Future of Cloud Computing - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
Cloud
Commentary
6/21/2010
05:42 PM
John Soat
John Soat
Commentary
50%
50%

Performance Anxiety: What the Intuit Problem Tells Us About the Future of Cloud Computing

As with many things in life, like heart attacks or giant oil spills, certain problems aren't necessarily problems until they are. That seems to be the case with the issue of performance in cloud computing, to judge from the negative reactions to the Intuit outage last week. So what are the lessons to be learned from this snafu?

As with many things in life, like heart attacks or giant oil spills, certain problems aren't necessarily problems until they are. That seems to be the case with the issue of performance in cloud computing, to judge from the negative reactions to the Intuit outage last week. So what are the lessons to be learned from this snafu?

Last week the web sites for Intuit's small-business online applications services were down for approximately 36 hours. Intuit has more than 300,000 customers using those sites, according to published reports.

Intuit president and CEO Brad Smith apologized in a letter on the company's blog site: "We hold ourselves to the highest standards in dependability and customer service, and over the past two days, we have failed to live up to those expectations." Smith revealed that the outage was caused by a power failure related to a "routine maintenance procedure" which took out both primary and backup systems.

Several commentators questioned Intuit's IQ level, and appropriately so, for housing primary and backup systems in the same location. One commentator, however, made the most salient point about it:

"Everyone complaining about the primary and backup systems in the same place, did you ask this company, who is holding your companies life blood, what the disaster plan was and is and how and where the primary and backups are and how the power is[?] ... Did you do your due diligence?"

Amen, brother.

In a recent blog about the weaknesses of cloud computing, I cited performance as the number one issue. Several commentators took me to task for that, dismissing performance issues with cloud service providers as overblown or less worrisome than those related to the operation of internal data centers.

There are two important points (at least) to be made about the Intuit problem:

First, performance is an issue with cloud computing … a big issue. Major corporations and institutions will remain hesitant to embrace cloud computing in any significant way as long as there are news stories every other week about service outages.

Second, customers have to take responsibility for their half of the partnership represented by cloud computing. That's why IT must be involved. The CIO, or members of his or her staff, must vet each and every SaaS, IaaS, and PaaS engagement to ensure that they meet the standards of a well-run IT organization in terms of performance, security, and compliance.As with many things in life, like heart attacks or giant oil spills, certain problems aren't necessarily problems until they are. That seems to be the case with the issue of performance in cloud computing, to judge from the negative reactions to the Intuit outage last week. So what are the lessons to be learned from this snafu?

We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Stuart Cook
100%
0%
Stuart Cook,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/15/2014 | 7:13:02 AM
Lessons learnt
This article is a good example of poor planning, obviously, but also maybe the need to be aware of the structure and layout of systems within an enterprise or data centre.   Performance Management is a very good prophylactic to head off total failures, as cited in the article, but also there is a need to understand where and what resides within a data centre and respectively enterprise.    As per the article, if both eggs are in the same basket, and the basket falls, then both get cracked, but if the infrastructure team were not aware they had placed both eggs in the same basket, then this is going to be a general risk to the business.   As a strong solution, not only should the performance of a data centre be monitored by the capability of a good Application Performance Management solution, but also there is a need to understand and identify the what's located in a data centre, and where those resources are located.  In addition to this, there is also a need to be able to recognise and respond to any changes in the infrastructure, so that pre-emptive action can be taken to try to avoid system wide failures.
Slideshows
7 Technologies You Need to Know for Artificial Intelligence
Jessica Davis, Senior Editor, Enterprise Apps,  7/1/2019
Commentary
A Practical Guide to DevOps: It's Not that Scary
Cathleen Gagne, Managing Editor, InformationWeek,  7/5/2019
Commentary
Diversity in IT: The Business and Moral Reasons
James M. Connolly, Editorial Director, InformationWeek and Network Computing,  6/20/2019
White Papers
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
State of the Cloud
State of the Cloud
Cloud has drastically changed how IT organizations consume and deploy services in the digital age. This research report will delve into public, private and hybrid cloud adoption trends, with a special focus on infrastructure as a service and its role in the enterprise. Find out the challenges organizations are experiencing, and the technologies and strategies they are using to manage and mitigate those challenges today.
Video
Current Issue
A New World of IT Management in 2019
This IT Trend Report highlights how several years of developments in technology and business strategies have led to a subsequent wave of changes in the role of an IT organization, how CIOs and other IT leaders approach management, in addition to the jobs of many IT professionals up and down the org chart.
Slideshows
Flash Poll