Photo Gallery: Large Hadron Collider Sets Record - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
Cloud
News
3/30/2010
10:48 PM
50%
50%

Photo Gallery: Large Hadron Collider Sets Record

The world's biggest machine is expected to produce 15 million GB of data annually for analysis by scientists eager to learn about subatomic particles and their role in the universe.




A cutaway image of the LHC.
(click for image gallery)

At a cost of $9 billion spent over 25 years punctuated by delays and repairs, the largest machine ever built is up and running, and smashing both particles and records.

Researchers at CERN's Large Hadron Collider set a record Tuesday by smashing two protons together in a head-on collision and releasing 7 trillion electronic volts (7 TeV) of energy -- three times more than the previous record.

The achievement came with the LHC operating at partial force, it won't operate at full throttle until 2013.

The LHC is housed in a 17-mile, circular tunnel 300 feet beneath the French/Swiss border, and is immense both in size and in purpose. Kurt Anderson describes a couple of its supersized attributes:

"At the center of just one of the four main experimental stations installed around its circumference, and not even the biggest of the four, is a magnet that generates a magnetic field 100,000 times as strong as Earth’s. And because the super-conducting, super-colliding guts of the collider must be cooled by 120 tons of liquid helium, inside the machine it’s one degree colder than outer space, thus making the L.H.C. the coldest place in the universe."

Researchers hope to use the LHC to test the Big Bang theory and other theories about the origins of matter, mass, and the universe. The idea is to recreate events similar to those believed to have occurred when the universe formed, and to study the data for clues to the origin of the universe.

The LHC could also provide evidence of dark matter, or invisible matter in between galaxies and may reveal unexpected information leading to new theories about creation.

The massive project is expected to produce roughly 15 million GB of data annually for analysis by scientists around the globe.

Reassurances from scientists notwithstanding, the tin-foil hat brigade has railed against the search for the so-called "God particle," fearing researchers would form black holes large enough to bring on doomsday.

As scientists began testing CERN's Large Hadron Collider in late 2008, hackers made a mockery of the European lab's network security. Days later, a liquid helium leak brought research to a halt for 18 months.

Operators plan to run the collider nearly continuously for the next 18 to 24 months. In late 2011 the LHC will be shut down for a year so that it may be prepared to operate at full capacity in 2013.

We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Slideshows
What Digital Transformation Is (And Isn't)
Cynthia Harvey, Freelance Journalist, InformationWeek,  12/4/2019
Commentary
Watch Out for New Barriers to Faster Software Development
Lisa Morgan, Freelance Writer,  12/3/2019
Commentary
If DevOps Is So Awesome, Why Is Your Initiative Failing?
Guest Commentary, Guest Commentary,  12/2/2019
White Papers
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
State of the Cloud
State of the Cloud
Cloud has drastically changed how IT organizations consume and deploy services in the digital age. This research report will delve into public, private and hybrid cloud adoption trends, with a special focus on infrastructure as a service and its role in the enterprise. Find out the challenges organizations are experiencing, and the technologies and strategies they are using to manage and mitigate those challenges today.
Video
Current Issue
Getting Started With Emerging Technologies
Looking to help your enterprise IT team ease the stress of putting new/emerging technologies such as AI, machine learning and IoT to work for their organizations? There are a few ways to get off on the right foot. In this report we share some expert advice on how to approach some of these seemingly daunting tech challenges.
Slideshows
Flash Poll