Congressional Report: Feds Lag In Year 2000 Compliance



The federal government is still drastically behind in its year 2000 compliance work, according to a new "report card" released today by the House Subcommittee on Government Management, Information, and Technology.

The report card--which is the sixth quarterly report generated by the subcommittee--is based on information that was provided to the subcommittee on Nov. 13 by the government's agencies and various departments about the status of compliance work for their crucial applications and other systems.

Based on the information, the subcommittee graded the federal government's overall year 2000 progress a "D," only slightly better than the D-minus received last quarter.

This means less than 60% of government systems are year 2000 compliant. At that rate, a subcommittee spokesman says, nearly one-third of the government's critical systems will not be compliant by the year 2000 deadline of March 30, 1999, established by President Clinton.

The Executive Branch and Department of Transportation were among the areas of government that also received a D grade. But those grades were not the worst: among the departments and agencies receiving F grades are the Justice Department, State Department, Health and Human Services, and the Department of Energy, the spokesman says.

The only agencies and departments receiving A grades were the Small Business Administration, which has its critical systems 100% compliant; as well as the Social Security Administration and the National Science Foundation, the spokesman says.

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