'Critical' Apple QuickTime Bug Affects iPod Users - InformationWeek

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'Critical' Apple QuickTime Bug Affects iPod Users

The flaw affects all Java-enabled browsers, including Microsoft's Internet Explorer, Mozilla's Firefox, and Apple's Safari.

A "highly critical" vulnerability has been reported in Apple QuickTime that opens up the millions of people who use iPods to attack.

The vulnerability, which is caused by an error in the way Apple QuickTime handles Java, can be exploited if a user visits a malicious Web site, running a Java-enabled browser. Researchers said that includes Microsoft's Internet Explorer, along with Mozilla's Firefox and Apple's Safari browser. The bug also affects Windows Vista through Internet Explorer 7.

The bug enables a hacker to execute code remotely. Security software firms Secunia and TippingPoint called the bug "highly critical." There have been no reports yet of the bug being exploited.

A spokesperson for Apple wasn't immediately available to comment on the findings.

Earlier this month, Apple announced that it had sold its 100 millionth iPod.

"It's very critical because of the cross-platform, multibrowser nature of it," said Terri Forslof, manager of security response with security company TippingPoint, in an interview. "I would say the attack surface is infinite. You can get the same privileges as the user who is logged on. There is an obvious potential for widespread attack."

Secunia, a security company known for tracking vulnerabilities, issued an advisory noting that the bug affects any platform supporting QuickTime. Secunia researches said the bug affects the Mac OS X system using Firefox and Safari.

Forslof said TippingPoint reported to Apple this week that the bug also affects Internet Explorer. She added that the flaw also would affect Windows Vista through IE7.

"Initially, the proof of concept code provided by the researcher, Dino Dai Zovi, only worked against the Safari and Firefox browsers," said Forslof. "We strongly believe at this point that any Java-enabled browser, which has the vulnerable QuickTime Java extension installed, is affected by this issue."

QuickTime is Apple's multimedia technology. The iPod uses the iTunes media player, which uses QuickTime. Forslof noted that if there is a way for iPod users to get around using QuickTime, it's not prevalent.

The bug was discovered by Dino Dai Zovi during the recent CanSecWest conference.

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