Giving Tech A Sporting Chance - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
Infrastructure // PC & Servers
Commentary
12/28/2006
02:11 PM
50%
50%

Giving Tech A Sporting Chance

Not being much of a sports fan -- sorry, guys -- I've always been a bit bemused by the lengths to which players will go in order to win for their fans, their teams, and (probably most importantly) their prize money or huge salaries. It seems to have gone from such traditionally accepted means as fixing games (as immortalized in countless boxing films) to taking unpleasant medications that will both increase your muscle mass and shorten your life span -- and now, to using technology to gain an ad

Not being much of a sports fan -- sorry, guys -- I've always been a bit bemused by the lengths to which players will go in order to win for their fans, their teams, and (probably most importantly) their prize money or huge salaries. It seems to have gone from such traditionally accepted means as fixing games (as immortalized in countless boxing films) to taking unpleasant medications that will both increase your muscle mass and shorten your life span -- and now, to using technology to gain an advantage over your opponent.For example, even such a presumably intellectual sport as chess has been in the "shouldn'ta done that" news lately -- last month, an Indian chess player was banned Tuesday from competition for 10 years after he was caught using a Bluetooth headset sewn into a cap. The idea was that accomplices would be using a computer at the other end and would clue him in on what move to make.

Not only does that read like a bad Mission Impossible script, but I can't help wondering whether the player in question shouldn't find some other sport to occupy himself with after his ten years is up -- say, marbles. Certainly, I can't imagine that anybody is ever going to be able to watch him wrinkle his forehead over a chess board with anything resembling a straight face.

We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Slideshows
Reflections on Tech in 2019
James M. Connolly, Editorial Director, InformationWeek and Network Computing,  12/9/2019
Slideshows
What Digital Transformation Is (And Isn't)
Cynthia Harvey, Freelance Journalist, InformationWeek,  12/4/2019
Commentary
Watch Out for New Barriers to Faster Software Development
Lisa Morgan, Freelance Writer,  12/3/2019
White Papers
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
Video
Current Issue
The Cloud Gets Ready for the 20's
This IT Trend Report explores how cloud computing is being shaped for the next phase in its maturation. It will help enterprise IT decision makers and business leaders understand some of the key trends reflected emerging cloud concepts and technologies, and in enterprise cloud usage patterns. Get it today!
Slideshows
Flash Poll