How To Make Money Selling iPhone Apps - InformationWeek

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IoT
IoT
Infrastructure // PC & Servers
Commentary
5/5/2009
11:18 PM
Michael Hickins
Michael Hickins
Commentary
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How To Make Money Selling iPhone Apps

Developers hoping to cash in on the enormous popularity of the iPhone have to hold their collective breaths every time they submit an app to Apple, hoping it will not get rejected for some unknown reason.

Developers hoping to cash in on the enormous popularity of the iPhone have to hold their collective breaths every time they submit an app to Apple, hoping it will not get rejected for some unknown reason.This may change with the release of the iPhone OS 3.0, which will include parental controls; one thing many rejected apps have in common is that they run up against Apple's fairly puritanical decency standards (although apps that make farting noises or provide proxies for shaking babies apparently don't).

Although the block system hasn't been fully illustrated, it should let parents screen for particular kinds of apps and, in theory, prevent younger children from seeing Page 3 or other more controversial content in the future.
For the time being, however, most developers are fighting emotions that range from frustrated to downright furious. Most recently, Nine Inch Nails front man Trent Reznor, whose app was rejected by Apple, said the iPhone maker's policies remind him of Wal-Mart's, calling its vague standards "a matter of consistency and hypocrisy." He went on to vent, "Come on Apple, think your policies through and for [Pete's] sake get your app approval scenario together."

Apple provides plenty of technical guidance on building apps for the iPhone but doesn't provide any guidance about how it vets them once they've been submitted. Furthermore, the approval process is fairly slow, and developers who have their apps rejected have to go to the back of the line when they resubmit. Based on anecdotal evidence, it's fair to assume that apps with sexually explicit content or that could in some way be construed as competing with Apple will be rejected.

But the process is driving people crazy, as TechCrunch reports. "The number of times I get pinged about an iPhone app getting rejected is almost catching up to the number of times I get pinged for ones accepted. Obviously, it's a very small percentage that get rejected, but developers are getting increasingly annoyed -- and for good reason in some cases."

In addition to the relief that is promised with OS 3.0, though, is that another source of revenue is coming for iPhone app developers. A company called AdMob "helps monetize many iPhone applications by giving them the ability to embed advertisements," according to Om Malik.

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