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5/1/2016
12:06 PM

10 Programming Languages That Will Keep You Employed

Here's a look at 10 programming languages that will make you rich, popular, and incredibly attractive. Or they might just help you get or keep a job -- which is better, anyway.
11 of 11

R

While most of the other languages on this list are general-purpose languages, R is designed for data analysis. The thing is, business analytics and big data are growing exponentially, so if you want to set yourself up to take advantage of the growth, then R is a language you should learn. R isn't new, having been around for more than 20 years. For most of that time, though, it was known only within the statistics and numerical analysis worlds. The growth of the business intelligence market kick-started R's growth and it now shows up frequently on lists of rapidly rising languages. If you have your eyes on job titles like 'data scientist' then you could do far worse than adding R to your set of programming skills.
So, that's my list. Ten languages that are big, are growing, or both. How many of these do you know? More important, how many would you like to know (or would like for the developers you hire to know)? I've long believed that well-rounded programmers should have more than one language under their belt. Just how many should be tucked away is a subject I'd love for you to weigh in on. I'd also like to know which critical language(s) I missed. Meet me in the comments and we'll get the conversation started.

(Image: Hadley Wickham and others via RStudio)

R

While most of the other languages on this list are general-purpose languages, R is designed for data analysis. The thing is, business analytics and big data are growing exponentially, so if you want to set yourself up to take advantage of the growth, then R is a language you should learn. R isn't new, having been around for more than 20 years. For most of that time, though, it was known only within the statistics and numerical analysis worlds. The growth of the business intelligence market kick-started R's growth and it now shows up frequently on lists of rapidly rising languages. If you have your eyes on job titles like "data scientist" then you could do far worse than adding R to your set of programming skills.

So, that's my list. Ten languages that are big, are growing, or both. How many of these do you know? More important, how many would you like to know (or would like for the developers you hire to know)? I've long believed that well-rounded programmers should have more than one language under their belt. Just how many should be tucked away is a subject I'd love for you to weigh in on. I'd also like to know which critical language(s) I missed. Meet me in the comments and we'll get the conversation started.

(Image: Hadley Wickham and others via RStudio)

11 of 11
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hho927
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50%
hho927,
User Rank: Ninja
9/2/2016 | 4:19:24 PM
Re: C++? no thanks
People who love Java hate C, C++ too.

C# is an answer to Java.

Then poeple who love C, C++ hate both. Mostly the speed, size of the programs.

You can do everything with C++ if you know how to. It's not for beginner. There is no clean up if you leave a mess. A poor written C++ program can crash the system.

C# is slow, can't get direct access to hardware. Hard to do system programming with C#. Drivers? Impossible.
Susan Fourtané
50%
50%
Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
5/7/2016 | 12:14:29 PM
Re: Java and JavaScript
BlooklynNellie, Aparently not. Curt reported on the case a few months ago. That's why I was wondering if he knew what happened. As per the votes the petition had at the moment Curt wrote the article and it was published it didn't have enough. I am assuming the petition failed. It was just ridiculous. -Susan
BrooklynNellie2
50%
50%
BrooklynNellie2,
User Rank: Moderator
5/6/2016 | 9:41:00 AM
Re: Java and JavaScript
LOL. Did whoever tried to ban it not realzie that they have nothing to do with each other (besides some C genes in their family trees)?
Taiko101
50%
50%
Taiko101,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/4/2016 | 6:30:35 PM
C++? no thanks
I switched to C# from C++ more than 10 years ago and have never looked back. C# handles generics much better than the kludge that C++ uses to implement them. Not having to mess with header files is worth the switch alone. And multiple inheritance in C++ is a big drawback; I don't use it, but it's a problem when other programmers do and you try to use their code. I won' go into my other gripes about C++. I'll just say that C# is what C++ (and Java, for that matter) should have been.
smichelle100
50%
50%
smichelle100,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/4/2016 | 12:14:32 PM
What about PL/SQL?
I realize it's proprietary to Oracle ... but Oracle has a reasonable slice of the world, yes?
Michelle
100%
0%
Michelle,
User Rank: Ninja
5/2/2016 | 11:00:09 PM
Go Swift
This is pretty much the list I expected to read. The only surprises were Swift and Go. I've seen Go gaining popularity over time -- I didn't expect it would make a "most employable" list.
Susan Fourtané
100%
0%
Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
5/1/2016 | 4:17:37 PM
Java and JavaScript
Curt, what ever happened with that petition to ban Java and JavaScript? I suppose it didn't go any further; am I right? -Susan
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