6 Hot Programming Languages To Add To Your Tool Kit - InformationWeek

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1/27/2016
07:06 AM
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6 Hot Programming Languages To Add To Your Tool Kit

Are you looking to tune up your software development or DevOps career with up-and-coming languages? Are you a hiring manager hoping to round out the tool set of your in-house team? Here are six languages to consider adding to your repertoire.
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Swift
If you're writing mobile software (and who can avoid that?) almost certainly you have to target iOS devices. Mobile development is going to continue to grow in importance, after all. Even if Apple continues to battle with Android for marketshare, it behooves you to know how to create iOS apps. That means it's time to investigate Swift, Apple's vision for a modern programming language.
Certainly, that's what Apple has in mind: Swift is meant to replace Objective-C. Swift 2 was released recently, and became open source as of December 2015. A Linux port is already available, arguably making Swift even more useful since it encourages other companies to support the language.
Don't feel that you have to dump other languages immediately, though. 'Worth noting' is not the same as 'dominating.' According to TIOBE, 'Apple's announcement to replace Objective-C by Swift some time ago was the main cause of [Objective-C's decline]. It was expected that Swift would gain as much popularity as Objective-C left behind, but that doesn't appear to be the case. This is also observed in practice: TIOBE's customers are not eagerly migrating to Swift yet.'
(Image: Apple)

Swift

If you're writing mobile software (and who can avoid that?) almost certainly you have to target iOS devices. Mobile development is going to continue to grow in importance, after all. Even if Apple continues to battle with Android for marketshare, it behooves you to know how to create iOS apps. That means it's time to investigate Swift, Apple's vision for a modern programming language.

Certainly, that's what Apple has in mind: Swift is meant to replace Objective-C. Swift 2 was released recently, and became open source as of December 2015. A Linux port is already available, arguably making Swift even more useful since it encourages other companies to support the language.

Don't feel that you have to dump other languages immediately, though. "Worth noting" is not the same as "dominating." According to TIOBE, "Apple's announcement to replace Objective-C by Swift some time ago was the main cause of [Objective-C's decline]. It was expected that Swift would gain as much popularity as Objective-C left behind, but that doesn't appear to be the case. This is also observed in practice: TIOBE's customers are not eagerly migrating to Swift yet."

(Image: Apple)

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