Embotics Manages Both Running And Offline Virtual Machines - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
Software // Enterprise Applications
News
9/28/2007
04:23 PM
Connect Directly
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Embotics Manages Both Running And Offline Virtual Machines

Controlling virtual machine "sprawl" is a problem that's beginning to be addressed by tools like startup Embotics' V-Commander.

As demand for virtual machines increases, so does the possibility of generating them ad hoc, then losing track of them. Controlling virtual machine "sprawl" is a problem that's beginning to be addressed by tools like startup Embotics' V-Commander.

Embotics came out of its development phase for a public debut at VMworld in San Francisco earlier this month. It's V-Commander will manage both running virtual machines and stored images of virtual machines.

If the operating system in both running and offline virtual machines needs to be patched, V-Commander can see that both bases are covered, VP of marketing David Lynch said in an interview. Updating running virtual machines is typically a top priority. Catching up with those that are stored on disk has been a loose end of virtual machine management, he said.

The tool has a built-in repository for storing core virtual machine images and ensuring that a family of virtual machines evolves from a common base for easier maintenance.

It can provide operational oversight of running VMs and govern their startup and provisioning with a centralized set of policies. The policies might dictate that virtual machines using lots of input/output in the middle of the day not be paired with virtual machines that must support unpredictable amounts of Web traffic throughout the day.

V-Commander can be used in conjunction with a partner's product, PlateSpin's PowerRecon Virtual Infrastructure. The PlateSpin product discovers a data center's server and software assets, including virtual machines, and determines their workloads.

The results of such a survey can be used to help set policies that are then enforced by V-Commander. The product can apply such policies to the virtual machines running in multiple VMware Virtual Centers, VMware's management system. Some VMware users end up activating multiple Virtual Centers, noted Lynch.

V-Commander will be generally available in the fourth quarter at a price of $25,000.

We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
News
Think Like a Chief Innovation Officer and Get Work Done
Joao-Pierre S. Ruth, Senior Writer,  10/13/2020
Slideshows
10 Trends Accelerating Edge Computing
Cynthia Harvey, Freelance Journalist, InformationWeek,  10/8/2020
News
Northwestern Mutual CIO: Riding Out the Pandemic
Jessica Davis, Senior Editor, Enterprise Apps,  10/7/2020
White Papers
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
Video
Current Issue
[Special Report] Edge Computing: An IT Platform for the New Enterprise
Edge computing is poised to make a major splash within the next generation of corporate IT architectures. Here's what you need to know!
Slideshows
Flash Poll