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10/27/2006
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The High-Tech Equalization Of America
informationweek.com/1112/blog_hitech.htm

During the IT job drought, I had a hard time convincing people that there were jobs to be had elsewhere. Many people I communicated with had a mind-set of big companies in major areas. "Check out school districts, smaller cities, and local governments," I'd say. They all have IT jobs. And many are located in areas where you don't need a quarter million for a starter home. My strategy got me three job offers in the worst downturn I've ever seen. Not great jobs, but survival, which is more than many of us managed. Get out your road atlas, and check out other communities. --Barb

I used to work in Boston, with all of the associated headaches of working in a city and living in suburbia. My commute was one hour and 20 minutes--one way. I moved to rural New Hampshire and now work in a tech job for a college and would not go back to the city mess for any amount of money.

If companies are now truly moving to the heartland, then I believe it to be a great idea and would consider heading out that way for the right opportunity--but there would have to be a least a hill for me to live on. --Anonymous

Will you people just leave us alone? Do you think we want any of your problems--inflated prices, overcrowding, crime, higher taxes, etc., etc.? Just stay where you are and leave us alone. --Jim S., Brookings, S.D. (just north of Sioux Falls)

It's a little-known fact, even locally, that the downtown area of Fresno, Calif., is a free high-speed hotspot. Wireless users can sit on the mall or the courtyard and cruise the Internet or check their e-mail. Pretty good for a little inland city, huh? --Pat Farnsworth

Poll: Metasploit--Help Or Menace?
informationweek.com/1111/blog_metasploit.htm

As many reputable security experts have often pointed out, there's no security through obfuscation. Cockroaches proliferate in the dark. I say, keep shining a very bright light on the security weaknesses of our systems so we can make them more resilient and immune to attacks by those lacking in moral fiber. --W. Boyle

Of course the Metasploit tools are useful to bona-fide developers intending to test their code's security. However, that doesn't mean it needs to be available for free download by anyone with a PC. Perhaps these companies should make their code available only to those who put up a bond--say, $100,000 or so--to prevent abuse or further dissemination of the code. At this point, these guys are less responsible than arms merchants or gun dealers, who are at least conducting background checks and whose wares, after all, are protected by the U.S. Constitution, which can't be said for commercial software. --Terry Hemphill

People are typically too lazy to create trouble on their own. The creative criminal will use any resource available, much like the lock picker or safe cracker. It seems that we're inviting more trouble by publishing the hack tools. --J. Schmidt

Researchers Measure E-Mail's Effectiveness As Business Tool
informationweek.com/1112/blog_email.htm

E-mail has its place, but a better way of communication--especially with team-based projects--is through a threaded conversation in a discussion forum.That would reduce the volume of e-mail some and provide for a more open and structured forum for communications. --R. Lawson

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