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Adobe Revs Acrobat For Windows Vista And Office 2007

Adobe has said its upgrade decisions have more to do with having finite developer resources and that it has no anti-Microsoft agenda.
Adobe Systems on Wednesday released an updated version of its Acrobat document creation software that is fully compatible with Microsoft's new Windows Vista operating system and Office 2007 productivity suite, the company said.

Adobe said Acrobat 8.1 is built to be fully compatible with Vista and all Office 2007 applications. "Both PDF as a file format and Acrobat as an application are now 'first class citizens' in these environments," wrote Lori DeFurio, an Acrobat developer, in a blog entry.

Among other things, Acrobat will now be able to take advantage of a Windows Vista feature that allows users to preview documents without actually opening them, DeFurio said.

Professional and standard editions of the software are available as a free download for existing Acrobat users, Adobe said.

Acrobat 8.0 shipped in November, prior to the January debut of Windows Vista and Office 2007, and as a result is not fully compatible with the products.

Adobe has taken some heat from users for what they claim is its lukewarm support for Microsoft's latest offerings. In March, the company made the controversial decision not to upgrade what, at the time, were the most current versions of its Photoshop, Dreamweaver, and InDesign products for full Vista compatibility.

Adobe said it was focusing its development resources on ensuring that the new CS3 versions of the products are fully compatible with the OS.

The decision led to speculation that Adobe isn't fully supporting Windows Vista because Microsoft appears to be stepping up competitive efforts against the company.

Adobe recently accused Microsoft of violating European Union trade laws, claiming that Microsoft's bundling of Vista and the XML Paper Specification document creation application -- a potential competitor to Acrobat -- is anticompetitive.

Additionally, Microsoft's new Silverlight multimedia authoring tool could take market share away from Adobe's popular Flash software.

Adobe has said its upgrade decisions have more to do with having finite developer resources and that it has no anti-Microsoft agenda.