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AMD Shows Off Its Sub-$150 Graphics Card

The company has taken a strategy of delivering its ATI graphics cards at prices that would appeal to casual gamers, while still providing the high-end products favored by serious players.
Advanced Micro Devices on Thursday introduced a PC-gaming graphics card for less than $150.

The ATI Radeon HD 4830 is the latest in AMD's 4800 series cards that support high-definition content and Microsoft's DirectX 10.1 graphics technology in Windows Vista. DirectX 10 is a collection of application programming interfaces for handling tasks related to game programming and video.

AMD has taken a strategy of delivering graphics cards at prices that would appeal to casual gamers, while still providing the high-end products favored by serious players. AMD cards range in price from less than $150 to $549.

The HD 4830 supports AMD's ATI CrossFireX technology that allows gamers to combine as many as four cards on one PC to boost game performance. The card also supports multichannel audio, often-called surround sound.

The latest card has a manufacturer's suggested retail price of about $147. The product is supported in motherboards from ASUS, Club 3D, Diamond Multimedia, Force3D, Gecube, Gigabyte, Hightech Information Systems, Jetway, MSI, Palit Multimedia, PowerColor, Sapphire Technology and VisionTek.

In a review on U.K.-based CustomPC magazine, the HD4830 was found to fit between AMD's HD 4670 and HD 4850 cards in terms of price and performance. The card appears to be aimed at potential buyers of AMD rival Nvidia's GeForce 9800 GT.

The AMD card has the same 512 MB of GDDR3 memory as the HD 4850 but slower clock speeds and fewer stream processors, the magazine said. In general, however, the reviewer wasn't sure of the gap the new card was suppose to fill in AMD's 4800 series.

"The HD 4850 has the 9800 GT licked for performance and costs a little bit less," the magazine said. "The HD 4830 might cost less still and still outperform the 9800 GT, but we'd still spend the little extra and invest in a HD 4850."

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