NASA's Apollo Archive: 10 Fascinating Images - InformationWeek

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10/9/2015
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Nathan Eddy
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NASA's Apollo Archive: 10 Fascinating Images

NASA enthusiasts now have access to more than 8,000 photos from the space agency's Apollo mission. InformationWeek has selected 10 of our favorites.
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While the Apollo missions to the Moon have produced some of the most iconic photos of the 20th century, Neil Armstrong's endlessly quoted proclamation upon setting foot on the surface, and an annoying cadre of conspiracy theorists, there's still a lot more to discover about our missions to the Moon.

Thanks to the Apollo Archive, first created in 1999 by Kipp Teague as a companion website to his "Contact Light" personal retrospective on Project Apollo, space enthusiasts now have access to more than 8,400 new photos of Apollo missions.

As of Oct. 2, this new repository of Apollo photographs is available to the public through Flickr.

"Around 2004, Johnson Space Center began re-scanning the original Apollo Hasselblad camera film magazines, and Eric Jones and I began obtaining TIFF (uncompressed, high-resolution) versions of these new scans on DVD," Teague told The Planetary Society. "These images were processed for inclusion on our websites, including adjusting color and brightness levels, and reducing the images in size to about 1000 dpi (dots per inch) for the high-resolution versions."

[Here's a look at NASA's latest mission: New Horizons.]

Project Apollo, was the third US human spaceflight program carried out by NASA, and accomplished landing the first humans on the Moon between 1969 and 1972. The final Apollo 17 mission in December 1972 marked the sixth Moon landing and the ninth manned mission beyond low Earth orbit.

While thousands of Apollo photos are available on Flickr, InformationWeek has taken a selection of our favorites and collected them for your viewing pleasure here.

(All images courtesy of NASA)

Nathan Eddy is a freelance writer for InformationWeek. He has written for Popular Mechanics, Sales & Marketing Management Magazine, FierceMarkets, and CRN, among others. In 2012 he made his first documentary film, The Absent Column. He currently lives in Berlin. View Full Bio

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Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
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10/12/2015 | 7:50:50 AM
Re: The truth is out there
Li Tan, the only danger to human beings are human beings themselves. -Susan
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
10/10/2015 | 10:28:01 AM
The truth is out there
nomi, some of the NASA missions are totally secret. If NASA would publish everything about its findings people would panic and the world would turn into chaos. What NASA makes public is just the nice and pretty, the innocent information that everyone can handle. -Susan
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